Podcast: It’s all about football

The Wildcat Rumble is back for its final episode of the semester. In this episode Andrew and Ricardo are joined by Alex Grant. Football is the topic of discussion as the NFL season presses on. Listen for your favorite segments, like game of the week, freaks and geeks and the moment of the week. Agree or disagree with anything? Comment below and tell us what you think.

The Wildcat Rumble will be back spring semester with new guests, different segments and more content. Be sure to check out the other podcasts from The Orion and give them a listen. “And if we don’t see ya, see ya.”

Andrew Baumgartner can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com or @abaum94 on Twitter.

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Incident in Glickman Library reported to Portland Police

Valerie Kazarian, Staff Writer

Officers from both USM Public Safely and the Portland Police Department were called to Glickman Library at about 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 12 in response to a disorderly conduct complaint. The incident involved students, staff and alumni, according to David Roussel, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs.   

“USM Public Safety has been called by Glickman Family Library staff four times in the past six weeks,” said Noel March, USM Chief of Police, “to help them address repeated reports of loud and unruly behavior during evening hours.” On Wednesday, “the conflict became loud and Portland police was called to assist the USM officer in escorting a few people from the library.”

The Office of Student Affairs sent all students a campus incident email providing initial information about the event. According to the email, “the incident was reported to USM officials and a full and timely investigation is being conducted related to this incident.”

Those affected by the disturbance will be contacted by USM administrators and campus officials, said Roussel. President Cummings, Chief March, and the human resources and student and academic affairs offices have begun the process of reviewing and evaluating relevant procedures to develop a report and action plan once the investigation is complete. “Student Affairs is reviewing the matter with the library and Public Safety staff to seek solutions to this type of unrest in the future,” March said.

This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available.         

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Letter to the Editor 12/14/2018

In response to Hopkins Hospital continues to undervalue the lives of its patients published on Dec. 26:

Dear Editors,

The Johns Hopkins News-Letter recently published a story and editorial that overlooked a number of important facts regarding nursing and patient care at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Safe, high-quality patient care is our first priority. The Johns Hopkins Hospital, a nonprofit hospital providing care for a large number of underserved residents, consistently earns recognition as one of the nation’s best hospitals for patient safety and care.

As your readers may be aware, National Nurses United has been trying to unionize nurses at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The story reports the results of a union survey based on responses from just 5 percent of the 3,200 nurses who work at the hospital. The survey does not accurately represent the voice of nurses, nor does your story mention the many nurses who oppose unionization.

Please allow me to set the record straight on several other issues.

While the union has filed complaints with the National Labor Relations Board, we believe the charges lack merit. Contrary to what the story reports, the NLRB process is ongoing and final determinations have not yet been made.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital is well-staffed to provide high-quality care. Our nurse turnover rates are well below the national average, and nurse vacancy rates are consistent with the national average. We offer nurses important scheduling flexibility and the option to work three 12-hour shifts each week – a schedule that many nurses want and prefer.

Our model is recognized across the country and around the world for a culture of clinical collaboration, open communication and shared governance. This approach helped The Johns Hopkins Hospital earn Magnet recognition for nursing excellence – the highest national distinction for professional nursing practice, awarded to only 8 percent of hospitals in the U.S. We were the first hospital in Maryland to earn the designation, in 2003, and among less than 1 percent of hospitals in the U.S. to receive Magnet designation four consecutive times.

Our nurses and hospital are among the best in the world. Together we make extraordinary contributions to the communities we serve. I am incredibly proud of what we have achieved and am grateful for the skills and commitment of all our nurses.

Signed,
Deborah Baker
Senior Vice President for Nursing, Johns Hopkins Health System
Vice President of Nursing and Patient Care Services, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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Alumnus offers opportunities for artists

Recent CSUN grad and author Jesse Orenshein is helping current students bridge the gap from students to professionals by recruiting them to work as illustrators on his series of children’s’ books. Louise Calvento, an animation major who graduated this fall, was the first to take him up on his offer.

“This was my very first children’s book experience,” Calvento said. “And I’m using the knowledge I learned from making this book with (Orenshein) at my current job. If anything, he was the reason why I got this gig I have now.”

Since graduating in May of 2018, Orenshein has published two books with CSUN artists and is in production on seven more with five other Matador artists. He describes the working relationship as a partnership and is offering interested artists an opportunity to develop new skills and challenge themselves creatively.

“I give the artists a lot of creative freedom,” Orenshein said. “Sometimes I have specific ideas for how I want something to look, but mostly it’s a collaborative process. And they’ve come up with some amazing stuff that I wouldn’t have even thought of.”

His second book, “The Strongest Man”, was just published last Friday. Its release coincides with the launch of his website and self-publishing brand: Grandpa Herbie’s Stories. All stories published under this umbrella will follow three rules that Orenshein feels are important elements of his style of storytelling: they rhyme, are adventurous and teach a moral lesson. The site features Orenshein’s current work and a peak at his upcoming projects.

“It’s named after my Grandfather who taught me to love story telling,” Orenshein said.

Orenshein, who transferred from Santa Monica College, started putting flyers up around campus during his first semester at CSUN. He quickly received dozens of responses from interested artists. Calvento was the first to send him a portfolio.

“I was blown away by her work,” Orenshein said. “She’s such a talented artist and it was a great experience working with her. I’ve been impressed by all of the CSUN artists I’ve worked with, with the professional quality of the work they’ve shown me.”

Calvento and Orenshein worked together on “The Boy Who Owned a Candy Store” which was published in June 2018. For Calvento, the experience was transformative, teaching her new skills and preparing her for a career path she hadn’t envisioned before.

“It taught me how to storyboard, how to structure books, it takes a lot of planning,” Calvento said. “And I’m actually doing children’s books as a living right now because of it.”

Orenshein has been busy since graduating, finishing 14 stories that still need collaborating artists.

“I work faster than I can find illustrators,” Orenshein said.

Orenshein is still looking for artists and still putting up flyers around CSUN. If you ask Calvento for her advice, she’d tell you not to just walk past those bulletin boards on campus.

“If you see an opportunity, take it,” Calvento said. “You don’t know where it could lead. I thought this was something small, but it became this real legit book that I have. It’s always been on my bucket list to have a book, and now it’s given me experience in real life, a career. So, if you see something that interests you, just go for it.”

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Star running back Devin Singletary declares for the 2019 NFL Draft

The most productive football player in FAU history is taking his talents to the next level, as star running back Devin Singletary announced in a Twitter post that he is declaring for the 2019 NFL draft.

“I hope I left a lasting impression on The University, football program, and the entire community,” Singletary wrote in the tweet. ““As I take the next step in to my career I will continue to represent FAU in the right way and you will forever be in my heart.”

Singletary is coming off an incredible junior season, rushing for 1,348 yards and 22 touchdowns on 5.2 yards per carry. His sophomore year was equally as special, the running back picking up 1,920 rushing yards to go along with 32 touchdowns.

Consistently fighting to get extra yards, Singletary is an incredibly powerful rusher who can shed tackles and truck defenders with ease. While he stands at just 5-foot 9, he is as hard to bring down as any big-bodied ballcarrier.

NFL teams will be salivating at the chance to get Singletary after the record-breaking career he had in Boca Raton. In only three season, Singletary became the leading rusher in FAU history and is sixth all-time in touchdowns nationally (66).

Singletary is the second Owl to declare early for the NFL draft, as redshirt-junior wide receiver Jovon Durante declared days prior. Walter Football, an NFL draft analysis website, projects Singletary to be selected between the second and fourth round.

If Singletary were selected in the second round, he would be the highest drafted player in program history. Defensive end Trey Hendrickson and cornerback D’Joun Smith were both taken in the third round in 2017 and 2015 respectively.

FAU fans will miss No. 5 taking the field at FAU Stadium, but can cheer him on wherever he lands in the professional ranks.

Zachary Weinberger is a contributing writer with the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email zawein11@gmail.com or tweet him @ZachWeinberger

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Are You Transy Field Hockey’s Newest Recruit?

Last week, many of you received an email recruiting you to play a sport you probably have never played in your life. That sport would be field hockey, and don’t worry, you weren’t the only one. If you received an email last week asking you to fill out a recruiting form, you’re in good company. The email went out to roughly 300,000 other people across the world.

While this was undoubtedly the result of a simple email mishap, it did make for quite the relatable moment for all of us who rely so heavily on technology. Everyone has hit reply all or sent a text to the wrong person before. Maybe not one that went out to over a quarter of a million people, but at the very least this made for some funny replies from people all across the globe.

There was a 73-year-old man who received the recruitment email and decided to write a reply. He said he still has remaining eligibility and that we should give him a shot. Before we get too carried away, it’s only fair that he comes in for a tryout so we can see his stick skills and his 40-yard dash time. If he’s got game, I say sign him up.

Another email was from a parent who has a son in high school who is awaiting emails from college coaches. The parent expressed gratitude for a college coach finally reaching out. This probably wasn’t the email the son wanted, or received because it was sent to the parent, but to that kid we say there is plenty of room for you to be a Pioneer. You just probably won’t be a member of the field hockey team.

Audrey Denham, a current junior on the team, wanted to express gratitude to her coaching staff for being so open-minded and inclusive. She said, “Well, I was kind of surprised that I was getting recruited again, which was pretty exciting. It’s an honor to be a part of a team that wants to include all of Transy and all of America.”

While Denham was thankful, there were some students at Transy who were slightly annoyed with the whole thing. They weren’t annoyed that they received the email. In fact they were bothered that they didn’t receive the email. Senior Charli Odenwelder stated, “I didn’t get the email and I was so offended. I have friends at Indiana University who got it and I actually go here.” Hang in there, Charli. Maybe field hockey just isn’t for you.

Any way you chop it up, Transylvania Field Hockey is now on the map. In fact, it’s all over the map. If everyone who received the email signed up to come to our esteemed university, we would be the first college to have over 300,000 students at one time. There’s a first time for everything, and hey, we are after all the Pioneers.

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Ending the stigma of female masturbation

Masturbation: in our culture, it’s often seen as the “she-who-must-not-be-named” of all actions.

At the drop of the “M-bomb,” you may experience an array of reactions: wonderful, gross, desperate, pleasurable, shameful. It might even make your shoulders tight and your face hot.

Regardless of your reaction, society has kept the conversation silent, especially for women.

According to the 2018 Tenga Global Self Pleasure Report, 76 percent of American women have masturbated, but it’s still culturally written off as just a “guy thing.”

Despite this statistic, the act of masturbation is unbelievably taboo, and in the midst of a period of widespread sexual liberation, there is still a stigma attached to what happens between a woman and herself.

A 2010 University of California study concluded that according to traditional gender-based sexual roles, sexual passivity is normalized for women and sexual agency is for men.

Conforming to these gender roles directly decreases sexual satisfaction for women, but does the opposite for males.

Labeling masturbation as a “guy thing” suggests that only boys are in pursuit of pleasure and that women could do with or without it.

The dirty connotation of female masturbation has made it perverted for male pleasure in pornography and in pop culture, leading women to feel shameful or selfish.

This is directly playing into the stereotype that a woman’s sexuality should be repressed until it’s somehow ignited by a man.

Meanwhile, in the real world women are owning it all damn day.

According to a 2015 Pennsylvania State University research study, women are more communicative on all sexual topics, except for masturbation, which men were generally far more open about.

It’s true, masturbation is a private thing, and no, it’s probably not the best casual conversation starter.

But it’s definitely worth recognizing that for both women and men, it’s a healthy and natural thing that, like sex, we either choose to do or not.

Simply thinking about the importance of your own pleasure is practicing sexual agency.

Being able to define yourself sexually, knowing what you want and what you don’t are important agents in accomplishing the goal you have going into a sexual encounter.

Women generally have been lacking sexual agency for decades, so to hush up the idea that women can and do, like men, derive pleasure from sex (or otherwise) is going against years of protected gender roles.

By playing into the stereotype, we are normalizing the idea that heterosexual sex is about a woman existing solely for male pleasure.

Women should be as unquestionably free to shamelessly explore and embrace their sexuality as men are.

So if you really want a cup of tea but there’s no one there to make it for you, great news, you can totally make it yourself.

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Morant and Brown shine in blowout victory

Story by Gage Johnson

Senior writer

gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

Murray State men’s basketball followed up its 22-point victory over Middle Tennessee State University with an impressive 28-point win over Southern Illinois University.

Two minutes into the first half, SIU reclaimed a 5-3 lead from Murray State with a layup by junior guard Eric McGill. Following sophomore guard Ja Morant’s second three of the game, the Racers got a 6-5 lead and never looked back.

Murray State would continue on a 17-4 run giving it a 21-9 lead with 10 minutes left to play in the first half. The Racers would continue to dominate on both ends of the floor, holding the Salukis to 19 percent shooting, to take a 39-14 lead into the locker room.

The two teams seemed to flip play styles on the night. The Salukis have shot 40 percent from three this season hitting seven a game, and were held to 1-for-7 at the end of the first half. Murray State is the best three-point defending team in the NCAA, with teams shooting 20 percent from three on average. SIU would also turn the ball over nine times out of its 16 total in the game in the first half of play.

Meanwhile the Racers were 32 percent shooters from three on the season, and shot 8-for-13 from three in the first half alone, powered behind redshirt freshman guard Tevin Brown’s 5-for-7 three-point shooting in the first half.

Murray State would be outscored by three in the second half, but their first half performance would be too much to overcome. The Racers would go on to defeat the Salukis 80-52.

While Morant, Brown and senior guard Shaq Buchanan held things down on the defensive end with eight steals between the three, Morant and Brown would be huge factors on the offensive side.

Morant would notch a double-double with 23 points and 13 assists, while Brown would follow with a career-high 20 points on 6-11 three-point shooting.

The Salukis’ Head Coach Barry Hinson said for as well as Brown shot the ball, much of the credit should be given to Morant’s ability to improve the team as a whole when on the floor.

“Good players are good players,” Hinson said. “Great players make everyone else better. All of those guys are feeding off of him right now. As good as Tevin was, Morant got him the ball on time and on target, and I don’t think you can take that for granted.”

The defense was a big key in the Racers’ victory, holding SIU to 31 percent shooting. Head Coach Matt McMahon thought that the team’s preparation translated to the game and was a huge factor in their success.

“I thought our preparation this week was terrific,” McMahon said. “Our effort at the defensive end of the first floor in the first half really set the tone. That enabled us to get out in transition and allowed Ja to get out in transition and make plays not only for himself, but for his teammates.”

Murray State will return home looking to stretch its win streak to three games against Jackson State University. The Racers will tip-off at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15, at the CFSB Center.

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Chris Klieman to Depart for Kansas State

On Monday night, what North Dakota State athletic director Matt Larsen had referred to as a “matter of time” finally came to fruition. It was announced that current Bison football head coach Chris Klieman would be departing NDSU for the head coaching vacancy at Kansas State. The Wildcats’ position was officially made available when former head coach Bill Snyder retired after 27 years.

Klieman’s contract with Kansas State is for six years at a salary of $2.3 million with $200K increases in each subsequent season. The Wildcats finished the 2018 campaign at 5-7 and finished eighth in the Big 12. K-State’s last conference title came in 2012 when they were co-champions with Oklahoma.

A key note for Bison fans is that Klieman will remain with NDSU for as long as the season continues. That could end either Friday night when the Herd hosts South Dakota State or in January if NDSU reaches the title game.

The announcement of Klieman’s new position brought an end to roughly a month’s worth of speculation regarding Klieman’s future. Because Kansas State athletic director Gene Taylor used to hold the same position for NDSU and hired Klieman, a Manhattan reunion had been theorized. The two have had strong ties since 2013, when Klieman began the lead job with the Bison.

Speculation turned into a legitimate possibility following Snyder’s retirement, when respected college football reporters in Kansas as well as around the nation began linking Klieman to the opening. Other respected names across the college football landscape were considered to be in the running as well. Mike Norvell of Memphis and North Texas’ Seth Littrell were considered to be leaders for the position. Neal Brown of Troy, Brent Venables of Clemson and Oregon’s Jim Leavitt were also rumored to be in the running. Norvell made it clear that he was committed to Memphis, while Littrell stuck with the Mean Green.

Truth be told, Klieman was in all likelihood Taylor’s top option. As the leader of the Bison for five seasons, Klieman has compiled a 67-6 record to go along with five conference titles and three FCS championships. Including his one season at Loras College, Klieman’s winning percentage is the third highest of any current NCAA coach across all divisions.

“He is a perfect fit for us, both from a personal standpoint and as a head coach,” Taylor said in K-State’s Monday night press release. “He will bring a ton of energy and excitement. His teams play extremely hard, disciplined football. He’s a winner. That’s all he does is win, and we’re excited to have Chris, Rhonda and the entire Klieman family join our K-State family.”

While Taylor — and by extension donors — have given Klieman a vote of confidence, many on social media have questioned the hire. Specific concerns include a lack of recruiting ties to Texas, a lack of FBS experience and that his résumé is diminished by being an FCS coach.

Perhaps in the short term the concerns regarding Klieman’s ability to recruit in Texas have been quelled. Over an hour after the announcement, Dallas cornerback Logan Wilson committed to K-State. While the current Wildcats staff deserves credit for that, it shows that the incoming Texan is confident in Klieman.

A critical concern for both NDSU and Kansas State is the status of current assistant coaches. Klieman has expressed that he would like to meet with the Wildcats’ current staff as he tries to build one of his own. Whether or not his staff would include expatriates from the Bison remains to be seen.

NDSU defensive coordinator Matt Entz would appear to be the leading internal candidate for the Bison’s vacancy, should Larsen decide to go in that direction. Entz has stewarded what has undoubtedly been the subdivision’s top defense since he was hired in 2014. Offensive coordinator Courtney Messingham would also be a leading internal option.

As far as the Bison’s identity is concerned, not much will change. “We’re going to run the ball. We’re going to play great defense,” Larsen commented. “That recipe has worked.” He indicated that he hopes interviews for the next head coach will begin this week.

With college football’s early signing period falling between Dec. 19 and Dec. 21, it was imperative for K-State to find their head coach before then. This allows for more stability for the program, as well as giving players a fair opportunity to assess their options. Klieman has experience in the realm of stabilizing an uncertain recruiting situation as well. When Craig Bohl abruptly left NDSU in December 2013, Klieman was tasked with righting the ship and ensuring that top recruits stuck with the Bison. He accomplished just that, and those recruits in large measure make up this season’s class of 24 seniors.

How NDSU’s coaching staff coalesces will be of the utmost importance in retaining this season’s recruiting class. The Bison have 20 commits in what may be their highest rated class in program history. According to the recruitment ranking website Rivals, NDSU has five three-star recruits, which includes Luke Weerts, Jaren Lewis and Hunter Poncius. Regardless, Larsen is confident that while Klieman was a major selling point, current commits will stick with NDSU for other reasons. Meanwhile, Kansas State’s class of 2019 contains a dozen commits and ranks No. 81 in the nation.

The post Chris Klieman to Depart for Kansas State appeared first on The Spectrum.

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Keepers and Sleepers: NFL Week 15

By: Timothy Klapac, Columnist

Who’s Hot

Josh Allen: QB Buffalo Bills (14 percent owned in Yahoo; 17 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Having a Buffalo Bill on the hot list feels weird, but Josh Allen has strung together a notable run of performances. His ability to produce on the ground should net another good result against the Lions. If your fantasy QB has been a concern, Allen may be your man for the playoffs

Derrick Henry: RB Tennessee Titans (59 percent owned in Yahoo; 56 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Sure, why not? You can’t produce 47 fantasy points in one game and not be on the hot list. While his season has been mostly disappointing, Thursday night may have been the breaking of the dam for Henry’s production in Music City. At the very least, he earned the bulk of the carries this week against the Giants.

Dante Pettis: WR San Francisco 49ers (46 percent owned in Yahoo; 19 percent owned in ESPN)

  • For the third consecutive week, Pettis was targeted seven times as he turned in another good fantasy performance. Up next is Seattle, whom Pettis accumulated 129 yards and two touchdowns against two weeks ago.

Doug Martin: RB Oakland Raiders (52 percent owned in Yahoo; 58 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Martin has been the lead back for the Raiders offense since the injury to Marshawn Lynch. Jalen Richard is only utilized on passing downs, which will not impact Martin’s touches against Cincinnati. The only concern would be is C.J. Anderson takes any carries from martin but I doubt that.

Who’s Not

Alshon Jeffery: WR Philadelphia Eagles (88 percent owned in Yahoo and ESPN)

  • Don’t let the touchdown fool you, Jeffery is among the numerous Eagles that have become fantasy irrelevant. The Philly offense is sputtering toward the abyss and you would be best served to keep any Eagles either on your bench or jettison them to the waiver wire.

Adrian Peterson: RB Washington (94 percent owned in Yahoo and ESPN)

  • I’m continuing my assault on the NFC East with this one. With the exception of his 90-yard touchdown against the Eagles, AP has 59 yards on 30 carries over the last three games. Due to the seemingly endless injury list for Washington, their matchup against Jacksonville will be ugly to watch and you should leave Peterson on the bench.

Sterling Shepard: WR New York Giants (75 percent owned in Yahoo; 71 percent owned in ESPN)

  • DOWN WITH THE NFC EAST! Similar to Jeffery, Shepard hauled in a short-yardage touchdown to make another disappointing fantasy week look good. Shepard couldn’t take advantage of Odell Beckham missing the game with an injury. With the final three games against teams in the playoff hunt, don’t expect Shepard to magically turn a corner.

Pittsburgh Steelers Defense (79 percent owned in Yahoo; 59 percent owned in ESPN)

  • These clearly aren’t the Steelers we’re used to seeing with an immovable defense. After allowing 24 points to the Raiders, it’s tough to see a quality fantasy output against the Patriots this week or the Saints the following week. Like I’ve said all season, don’t overlook the fantasy value of defenses.

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Keepers and Sleepers: NFL Week 15

By: Timothy Klapac, Columnist

Who’s Hot

Josh Allen: QB Buffalo Bills (14 percent owned in Yahoo; 17 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Having a Buffalo Bill on the hot list feels weird, but Josh Allen has strung together a notable run of performances. His ability to produce on the ground should net another good result against the Lions. If your fantasy QB has been a concern, Allen may be your man for the playoffs

Derrick Henry: RB Tennessee Titans (59 percent owned in Yahoo; 56 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Sure, why not? You can’t produce 47 fantasy points in one game and not be on the hot list. While his season has been mostly disappointing, Thursday night may have been the breaking of the dam for Henry’s production in Music City. At the very least, he earned the bulk of the carries this week against the Giants.

Dante Pettis: WR San Francisco 49ers (46 percent owned in Yahoo; 19 percent owned in ESPN)

  • For the third consecutive week, Pettis was targeted seven times as he turned in another good fantasy performance. Up next is Seattle, whom Pettis accumulated 129 yards and two touchdowns against two weeks ago.

Doug Martin: RB Oakland Raiders (52 percent owned in Yahoo; 58 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Martin has been the lead back for the Raiders offense since the injury to Marshawn Lynch. Jalen Richard is only utilized on passing downs, which will not impact Martin’s touches against Cincinnati. The only concern would be is C.J. Anderson takes any carries from martin but I doubt that.

Who’s Not

Alshon Jeffery: WR Philadelphia Eagles (88 percent owned in Yahoo and ESPN)

  • Don’t let the touchdown fool you, Jeffery is among the numerous Eagles that have become fantasy irrelevant. The Philly offense is sputtering toward the abyss and you would be best served to keep any Eagles either on your bench or jettison them to the waiver wire.

Adrian Peterson: RB Washington (94 percent owned in Yahoo and ESPN)

  • I’m continuing my assault on the NFC East with this one. With the exception of his 90-yard touchdown against the Eagles, AP has 59 yards on 30 carries over the last three games. Due to the seemingly endless injury list for Washington, their matchup against Jacksonville will be ugly to watch and you should leave Peterson on the bench.

Sterling Shepard: WR New York Giants (75 percent owned in Yahoo; 71 percent owned in ESPN)

  • DOWN WITH THE NFC EAST! Similar to Jeffery, Shepard hauled in a short-yardage touchdown to make another disappointing fantasy week look good. Shepard couldn’t take advantage of Odell Beckham missing the game with an injury. With the final three games against teams in the playoff hunt, don’t expect Shepard to magically turn a corner.

Pittsburgh Steelers Defense (79 percent owned in Yahoo; 59 percent owned in ESPN)

  • These clearly aren’t the Steelers we’re used to seeing with an immovable defense. After allowing 24 points to the Raiders, it’s tough to see a quality fantasy output against the Patriots this week or the Saints the following week. Like I’ve said all season, don’t overlook the fantasy value of defenses.

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Keepers and Sleepers: NFL Week 15

By: Timothy Klapac, Columnist

Who’s Hot

Josh Allen: QB Buffalo Bills (14 percent owned in Yahoo; 17 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Having a Buffalo Bill on the hot list feels weird, but Josh Allen has strung together a notable run of performances. His ability to produce on the ground should net another good result against the Lions. If your fantasy QB has been a concern, Allen may be your man for the playoffs

Derrick Henry: RB Tennessee Titans (59 percent owned in Yahoo; 56 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Sure, why not? You can’t produce 47 fantasy points in one game and not be on the hot list. While his season has been mostly disappointing, Thursday night may have been the breaking of the dam for Henry’s production in Music City. At the very least, he earned the bulk of the carries this week against the Giants.

Dante Pettis: WR San Francisco 49ers (46 percent owned in Yahoo; 19 percent owned in ESPN)

  • For the third consecutive week, Pettis was targeted seven times as he turned in another good fantasy performance. Up next is Seattle, whom Pettis accumulated 129 yards and two touchdowns against two weeks ago.

Doug Martin: RB Oakland Raiders (52 percent owned in Yahoo; 58 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Martin has been the lead back for the Raiders offense since the injury to Marshawn Lynch. Jalen Richard is only utilized on passing downs, which will not impact Martin’s touches against Cincinnati. The only concern would be is C.J. Anderson takes any carries from martin but I doubt that.

Who’s Not

Alshon Jeffery: WR Philadelphia Eagles (88 percent owned in Yahoo and ESPN)

  • Don’t let the touchdown fool you, Jeffery is among the numerous Eagles that have become fantasy irrelevant. The Philly offense is sputtering toward the abyss and you would be best served to keep any Eagles either on your bench or jettison them to the waiver wire.

Adrian Peterson: RB Washington (94 percent owned in Yahoo and ESPN)

  • I’m continuing my assault on the NFC East with this one. With the exception of his 90-yard touchdown against the Eagles, AP has 59 yards on 30 carries over the last three games. Due to the seemingly endless injury list for Washington, their matchup against Jacksonville will be ugly to watch and you should leave Peterson on the bench.

Sterling Shepard: WR New York Giants (75 percent owned in Yahoo; 71 percent owned in ESPN)

  • DOWN WITH THE NFC EAST! Similar to Jeffery, Shepard hauled in a short-yardage touchdown to make another disappointing fantasy week look good. Shepard couldn’t take advantage of Odell Beckham missing the game with an injury. With the final three games against teams in the playoff hunt, don’t expect Shepard to magically turn a corner.

Pittsburgh Steelers Defense (79 percent owned in Yahoo; 59 percent owned in ESPN)

  • These clearly aren’t the Steelers we’re used to seeing with an immovable defense. After allowing 24 points to the Raiders, it’s tough to see a quality fantasy output against the Patriots this week or the Saints the following week. Like I’ve said all season, don’t overlook the fantasy value of defenses.

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Keepers and Sleepers: NFL Week 15

By: Timothy Klapac, Columnist

Who’s Hot

Josh Allen: QB Buffalo Bills (14 percent owned in Yahoo; 17 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Having a Buffalo Bill on the hot list feels weird, but Josh Allen has strung together a notable run of performances. His ability to produce on the ground should net another good result against the Lions. If your fantasy QB has been a concern, Allen may be your man for the playoffs

Derrick Henry: RB Tennessee Titans (59 percent owned in Yahoo; 56 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Sure, why not? You can’t produce 47 fantasy points in one game and not be on the hot list. While his season has been mostly disappointing, Thursday night may have been the breaking of the dam for Henry’s production in Music City. At the very least, he earned the bulk of the carries this week against the Giants.

Dante Pettis: WR San Francisco 49ers (46 percent owned in Yahoo; 19 percent owned in ESPN)

  • For the third consecutive week, Pettis was targeted seven times as he turned in another good fantasy performance. Up next is Seattle, whom Pettis accumulated 129 yards and two touchdowns against two weeks ago.

Doug Martin: RB Oakland Raiders (52 percent owned in Yahoo; 58 percent owned in ESPN)

  • Martin has been the lead back for the Raiders offense since the injury to Marshawn Lynch. Jalen Richard is only utilized on passing downs, which will not impact Martin’s touches against Cincinnati. The only concern would be is C.J. Anderson takes any carries from martin but I doubt that.

Who’s Not

Alshon Jeffery: WR Philadelphia Eagles (88 percent owned in Yahoo and ESPN)

  • Don’t let the touchdown fool you, Jeffery is among the numerous Eagles that have become fantasy irrelevant. The Philly offense is sputtering toward the abyss and you would be best served to keep any Eagles either on your bench or jettison them to the waiver wire.

Adrian Peterson: RB Washington (94 percent owned in Yahoo and ESPN)

  • I’m continuing my assault on the NFC East with this one. With the exception of his 90-yard touchdown against the Eagles, AP has 59 yards on 30 carries over the last three games. Due to the seemingly endless injury list for Washington, their matchup against Jacksonville will be ugly to watch and you should leave Peterson on the bench.

Sterling Shepard: WR New York Giants (75 percent owned in Yahoo; 71 percent owned in ESPN)

  • DOWN WITH THE NFC EAST! Similar to Jeffery, Shepard hauled in a short-yardage touchdown to make another disappointing fantasy week look good. Shepard couldn’t take advantage of Odell Beckham missing the game with an injury. With the final three games against teams in the playoff hunt, don’t expect Shepard to magically turn a corner.

Pittsburgh Steelers Defense (79 percent owned in Yahoo; 59 percent owned in ESPN)

  • These clearly aren’t the Steelers we’re used to seeing with an immovable defense. After allowing 24 points to the Raiders, it’s tough to see a quality fantasy output against the Patriots this week or the Saints the following week. Like I’ve said all season, don’t overlook the fantasy value of defenses.

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Wildcat of the Week- McKena Barker

McKena Barker is a Chico native that has been a part of the Chico State women’s basketball team since fall of 2014. She received her bachelor’s degree in public administration in spring 2018 and is currently working on her masters for public administration. In her previous season with Chico State, she received All-CCAA Honorable mention, which would be the second in her Chico State career. She led the Wildcats in rebounds for the third straight season and is ranked fifth in the CCAA overall. Barker has been remarkable since her freshman season, posting five double-doubles, which was more than any other Chico State player since 2007. She is currently a six-time CCAA All-American selection and has received three Division II Athletic Directors Association Academic Achievement awards.

When did you start playing basketball?

I started playing basketball when I was in second grade, so it’s been a while. I started young and was just playing in local leagues. I fell in love with it, so I just kept going.

Do you have any routines before a game?

My routine before a game, I eat a big meal, usually pasta like spaghetti. Then I usually listen to pump up music and just get hyped with my teammates. Nothing too crazy, just being around my team and getting excited.

How do you manage your time being a student athlete?

Being a student athlete is a lot of time management, you got to prioritize when you’re going to do homework, when you’re going to get into the gym and go to practice. So, usually I try to get my homework done before practice in the morning and, if I have stuff left over, I do it after practice at night. But mostly it is just setting a schedule and sticking to it.

Optimized-IMG_1432 (1).JPG

Chico State forward McKena Barker leads all Wildcats in rebounding. Photo credit: Caitlyn Young

What are you most excited about for the current season?


This season is going to be a huge one for our team. we got a great squad, everyone likes each other and we got great team chemistry. I am excited to get after it with these girls and play my last season with them. And hopefully bring home a conference championship.

As a senior on the squad how will you lead the team?

I think my role as a senior this year has been one that I kind of grown into. Just getting used to using my voice and helping the younger girls with what to do and where to go. I’ve been really focusing this year on always bringing energy and just being excited for every practice and every game. Then use that to help lead the team.

How did your mother and you start wearing matching socks on game day?


It happened last year she got me a new pair of socks for Christmas. Me and my brother actually got her a new pair of socks which were the same brand. It’s just a little tradition that we do, game day socks. So before the game. if she’s there, I look up at her and she lifts her pant leg up to show me that she is wearing her matching socks. It a little family thing we do and it gets me really excited for the game.

What’s your favorite thing about basketball?

My favorite thing about basketball is probably just the team dynamic. The way it feels after a big win, to just celebrate with all these girls that you worked really hard with. That feeling never goes away and it’s something that I really cherish.

Lucero Del Rayo can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com or @del_rayo98 on Twitter.

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Steak ‘n Shake coming to Georgia State campus

Georgia State will soon have a new restaurant on campus as a Steak ‘n Shake arrives early next spring semester.

Amanda Shoff, spokesperson for PantherDining at Georgia State, said the location will be located across from the University Bookstore, in the Panther’s Club food court, and will replace the current State Place Grill. Shoff said she’s hoping the location will open in mid-January.

“We just finalized the contract, so hopefully the turnaround will be quick, regarding training, construction and operations,” Shoff said. “I will have a better idea about when the Steak ‘n Shake will open once we meet with the designer and work out a more defined schedule.”

New restaurants make their way onto campus through a variety of methods. One is when restaurants simply rent the space and are self-supporting, such as Waffle House. Others, like Chick-fil-A and now Steak ‘n Shake, arrive on campus through license agreements.

“PantherDining conducted surveys, spoke with [the Student Government Association] and analyzed historical sales data to find out what the students would like to see on campus,” she said. “We used that information, as well as price point, quality and efficiency, to decide what restaurants to bring to campus.”

With the opening of a new restaurant comes an opportunity for on-campus jobs. Interested students can apply on the PantherDining website, by clicking the Employment tab and going through Handshake.

Students will also be able to find a new Panda Express in the Courtyard dining center in Student Center East, when it opens for the spring semester. Several students weighed in on the news of the new dining additions and what they want to see on campus in the future.

“I did not know about [the Steak ‘n Shake],” student My Truong said. “I think the more food places there are in general, the better it is for the community.”

Grace Cho agreed that Steak ‘n Shake is a good addition, but she’d also like to see more vegan and vegetarian restaurants at Georgia State. Low-carb, Keto and Paleo options are something senior Eric Levengood is hoping for on campus, but he said he’s looking forward to getting bunless burgers at the new Steak ‘n Shake.

While onion rings may excite some students like Maria Ahmad, others aren’t so thrilled about the new arrival.

“I hate to see another source of for-profit, cheap and nutritionally shallow food added to the diet of students,” student Linda McGinn said. “Doesn’t anyone in the administration and student body care about their health?”

Zi Morfaw isn’t so thrilled about Georgia State offering another fast, unhealthy option to students.

“They really just want to get more money for having more junk food,” Morfaw said. “They need to make their prices reasonable – salad at the Saxby in the library is like $8.”

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Racers can’t cement first road win at Illinois

Story by Gage Johnson

Senior writer

gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

Murray State women’s basketball traveled to Champaign, Illinois, for a Tuesday matchup against the University of Illinois, and fell to the Fighting Illini 84-52.

Illinois would gain the first lead of the game at 2-0, and there would not be a single lead change after.

The Racers started off the game by holding the Fighting Illini to just 14 points in the first quarter. However, poor shooting led to Murray State trailing 14-6 heading into the second quarter of play.

Illinois then proceeded to take over the game, kicking the second quarter off with a 12-0 run. 18-for-33 shooting from the field (54.5 percent) would allow the Fighting Illini to head into the locker room holding a commanding 42-19 lead over the Racers.

Murray State struggled to make shots from the field, shooting just 8-for-36 (22.2 percent) in the first half. This would be the Racers’ Achilles heel on the night, finishing the game 19-for-70 (27.1%).

Murray State has struggled to shoot the ball as of late, and Head Coach Rechelle Turner thinks any improvement will come down to simply shooting through the funk.

“I thought for the most part we got good shots, we just weren’t knocking them down,” Turner said. “That’s just uncharacteristic. We’ve got to figure things out and shoot with a little more confidence.”

The Racers would go on to be outscored 42-33 in the second half, en route to a 84-52 loss. This loss leaves Murray State winless on the road this season, with two tough non-conference road opponents in the University of Kentucky and the University of Tennessee on the schedule.

Despite the lackluster performance, junior forward Evelyn Adebayo shined, notching a double-double on the night with 23 points and 13 rebounds.

Adebayo praised the team’s effort for continuing to play hard despite their deficit throughout the majority of the game.

“Today just wasn’t our night,” Adebayo said. “The fact that we stayed together and we kept hustling and playing hard, we know it will pay off in the future.”

Murray State will return home for its next game against Bethel University at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 13, at the CFSB Center.

***

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Racers can’t cement first road win at Illinois

Story by Gage Johnson

Senior writer

gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

Murray State women’s basketball traveled to Champaign, Illinois, for a Tuesday matchup against the University of Illinois, and fell to the Fighting Illini 84-52.

Illinois would gain the first lead of the game at 2-0, and there would not be a single lead change after.

The Racers started off the game by holding the Fighting Illini to just 14 points in the first quarter. However, poor shooting led to Murray State trailing 14-6 heading into the second quarter of play.

Illinois then proceeded to take over the game, kicking the second quarter off with a 12-0 run. 18-for-33 shooting from the field (54.5 percent) would allow the Fighting Illini to head into the locker room holding a commanding 42-19 lead over the Racers.

Murray State struggled to make shots from the field, shooting just 8-for-36 (22.2 percent) in the first half. This would be the Racers’ Achilles heel on the night, finishing the game 19-for-70 (27.1%).

Murray State has struggled to shoot the ball as of late, and Head Coach Rechelle Turner thinks any improvement will come down to simply shooting through the funk.

“I thought for the most part we got good shots, we just weren’t knocking them down,” Turner said. “That’s just uncharacteristic. We’ve got to figure things out and shoot with a little more confidence.”

The Racers would go on to be outscored 42-33 in the second half, en route to a 84-52 loss. This loss leaves Murray State winless on the road this season, with two tough non-conference road opponents in the University of Kentucky and the University of Tennessee on the schedule.

Despite the lackluster performance, junior forward Evelyn Adebayo shined, notching a double-double on the night with 23 points and 13 rebounds.

Adebayo praised the team’s effort for continuing to play hard despite their deficit throughout the majority of the game.

“Today just wasn’t our night,” Adebayo said. “The fact that we stayed together and we kept hustling and playing hard, we know it will pay off in the future.”

Murray State will return home for its next game against Bethel University at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 13, at the CFSB Center.

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10 gifts from Amazon for the people you “sort of” tolerate

Let’s face it, you still need to buy Christmas presents for several people, including that one coworker, your cousin and that “friend” you’re unsure why you still hang out with. But if you’re like me, you do not want to break the bank on someone you don’t really like.

Here are 10 gift ideas from Amazon that will show others that you care, but not too much.

1. 12 Packs of Trident Original Flavor Sugar-Free Gum, $6.82

You know how Barb from Accounting eats tuna salad for lunch every day? And then she stinks up the water cooler, talking up a storm about her nephew and how she’s so proud of him? Well, say goodbye to Barb’s bad breath with Trident!

This gift is perfect for those who you wish would brush their teeth more than once in the morning, and with 62% of Amazon consumers rating this product “5 stars,” you can’t go wrong!

2. 7” x 10” “Quiet Please” Sign, $8.47

Sick of grandma making racist comments at Christmas dinner? Well, shut her up with his “Quiet Please” sign by SmartSign! This durable piece of plastic has a guaranteed lifespan of five years, and is made from 96% recycled materials, so it’s good for the environment.

Amazon user klc travel summed up this product perfectly in their review, which simply said, “Good!”

3. General Motors 95161606 Windshield Wiper Blade, $9.99

Do you love your dad, but the only thing you know about him is that he likes cars? Are you still holding some resentment toward him for missing your Little League game the one time you were actually allowed off the bench?

If so, then the General Motors 95161606 Windshield Wiper Blade is the perfect present for him! This gift will tell him that you do know his interests while also letting him know that you’re the same angsty teen that hates his guts.

Only one wiper blade is included, so make sure to tell your dad that he’ll need to buy the other.

4. 2 Pack – White Marble Decal Sticker Vinyl Skin for Juul Vape, $6.99

Remember earlier this year, when your cousin was suspended from high school for using her JUUL in the bathroom? Well, make her year by buying a skin for her JUUL.

This two-pack will add a classy, white marble look to her nicotine-infused flash drive and has an average 4-star rating!

Note: This gift also works for any dude you meet on Tinder.

5. I AM STUPID Funny Lost Bet Fantasy Sports T-Shirt, $16.99

Do you have a friend who keeps going back to her loser boyfriend? What about a professor who always forgets what’s on their syllabus? Do you just know someone who, whenever they open their mouth, you hear the dumbest stuff?

Let them know how you feel with the I AM STUPID Funny Lost Bet Fantasy Sports T-Shirt for only $16.99!

Sizes range from a kid’s 4 to a men’s 3XL and they come in six colors. Just tell them to stay home on the seventh day – and you can get someone a shirt for nearly every day of the week.

6. You Got This Funny Quote Coffee Mug, Funny Gift for Coworker Friend, Motivational Mug, Fun Mugs, $10.97

Sick of playing therapist for your friends? Give them a daily confidence boost with the You Got This Funny Quote Coffee Mug, Funny Gift for Coworker Friend, Motivational Mug, Fun Mugs by Loftipop!

Amazon user KN said, “It was as expected.”

If your not-so-special someone doesn’t drink coffee, don’t fret. This mug can also hold water, milk, tea and most other liquids.

7. 5 Fake All-Winning Scratch-Off Lottery Tickets, $5.75

Give your family the gift of false hope this year by stuffing their stockings with Fake Lottery (Lotto) Tickets Assorted Party Bundle by Matty’s Toy Shop!

With 5 tickets per pack, you can instill in some of your relatives the joy of being a millionaire, only to watch the holiday spirit fade from their eyes as they realize the ticket is fake.

Note: This product is intended for consumers ages 18 or older. Do not use this as a last-minute gift for children.

8. Demeter Cologne Spray, Funeral Home, 3.4 oz., $32.50

Let’s face it, grandpa isn’t getting any younger. Get him ready for the afterlife with Demeter Cologne Spray, Funeral Home edition!

Unlike regular, boring colognes, after you hug Gramps, Demeter’s Funeral Home will leave you smelling like white flowers, mixed with stems and leaves.

It is the perfect gift for those who are close to death or close to nature.

9. Crafting with Cat Hair: Cute Handicrafts to Make with Your Cat, $13.46

Help Aunt Becky and Cousin John turn their cats’ hairballs into sweaters with the book “Crafting with Cat Hair: Cute Handicrafts to Make with Your Cat” by Kaori Tsutaya.

This gift provides step-by-step instructions on how to turn feline fur into fluffy cat toys, picture frames and many other useless crafts!

The book is also available on the Kindle App store for $9.99 (if you know anyone who still uses a Kindle).

10. Accoutrements Bacon Soap in Tin, $7.89

Make your girlfriend the snack that smiles back with Accoutrements Bacon Soap in Tin! This marbled piece of soap provides a quick clean while leaving the crisp smell of bacon clinging to your body. Beware, the soap is not as tasty as the real thing.

This holiday season, give gifts that make you smile.

 

Interested in joining the Sentinel staff? Reach out to our Editor, Kori Hines, at sentinel@hawks.rockhurst.edu to see how you can get involved.

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The best disco in town: A playlist curated by CSUN’s discogod

Students on campus may find themselves walking to class to the sound of disco music coming from a blue compact Makita Bluetooth speaker thanks to Chris Salazar, a communications major and a lover of disco.

“I like seeing people bop their head as they’re walking,” Salazar said in regards to the simple reason behind sharing his taste in music.

He sat in the quad, in front of the Oviatt Library where he’s usually stationed, enjoying the tunes and the positive reactions the music brings to students.

“Most people don’t know the songs but they seem to like it,” Salazar said.

As an avid disco listener, he decided to compile his favorite songs in a public Spotify playlist, “The Best Disco in Town,” that can be found under the username discogod_.

His acquired taste for disco went along with the dark sunglasses, fringed hairstyle and the white Lacoste sweater layered by a warm blazer he was wearing; he stands out as the result of a smooth aesthetic he has created for himself.

zzmakiiiiita.jpg
Compact Makita buetooth speaker. Salazar uses this speaker to blast out the good disco songs of the late 70s and early 80s. Photo credit: Ivan Salinas

To add to his mysteriousness, Salazar mentioned his dislike of mainstream disco songs and the new ‘comeback’ of the genre.

“It is too electronic,” he said, compared to the basic instrumentation of the late ’70s and early ’80s with a few wind instruments and the guitar-bass-drum format.

Next time you find yourself on campus, you may want to speak to Salazar about disco and learn something new or Shazam one of the songs he is playing. This genre of music is known for only being “dance” music, but such a simplistic labeling of the genre can discredit those artists that have made something more meaningful and complex that is worth paying attention to.

Here are five songs recommended by discogod_ himself from his curated Spotify playlist. Whether it is 12” single versions or extended mixes, there are plenty of songs to enjoy.

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5fvGoOa9PRq2UlJqlDjedQ

1. The Fruit Song by Jeannie Reynolds

“The song has a double entendre, it talks about bananas and other things but you get the real meaning,” Salazar mentioned. “It was common for disco songs to be provocative at that time.”

2. I Want Your Love (Dimitri from Paris remix) by CHIC

This is one of the long songs Salazar was referring to. “Nile Rodgers is the guitar player of the band,” he added. “He also started a group called Sister Sledge.” The group only managed to make one song produced by Rodgers, but recently he was featured in Daft Punk’s album “Random Access Memories” where his guitar playing is once more immortalized.

3. Romeo and Juliet by Alec R. Costandinos

“I would say all of Costandinos’s work is great because of the orchestration he has in his songs,” Salazar said. “His best work is the ‘Romeo and Juliet’ album, which is basically the entire story told through a disco in a non-stop format.”

4. Soul Makossa by Manu Dibango

“It is said to be the first disco song,” Salazar explained. “Michael Jackson actually stole the chorus from this in ‘Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin.’”

5. Open Sesame by Kool & The Gang

“This last song has amazing brass work,” Salazar said. “It contrasts against the later works they did where they simplified their sound. In general, it’s hard to pick because there just so much good disco songs that nobody has ever heard of before. Some of them are pretty good, amazing even, and some of them are so bad and cheesy that they are good too.”

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The best disco in town: A playlist curated by CSUN’s discogod

Students on campus may find themselves walking to class to the sound of disco music coming from a blue compact Makita Bluetooth speaker thanks to Chris Salazar, a communications major and a lover of disco.

“I like seeing people bop their head as they’re walking,” Salazar said in regards to the simple reason behind sharing his taste in music.

He sat in the quad, in front of the Oviatt Library where he’s usually stationed, enjoying the tunes and the positive reactions the music brings to students.

“Most people don’t know the songs but they seem to like it,” Salazar said.

As an avid disco listener, he decided to compile his favorite songs in a public Spotify playlist, “The Best Disco in Town,” that can be found under the username discogod_.

His acquired taste for disco went along with the dark sunglasses, fringed hairstyle and the white Lacoste sweater layered by a warm blazer he was wearing; he stands out as the result of a smooth aesthetic he has created for himself.

zzmakiiiiita.jpg
Compact Makita buetooth speaker. Salazar uses this speaker to blast out the good disco songs of the late 70s and early 80s. Photo credit: Ivan Salinas

To add to his mysteriousness, Salazar mentioned his dislike of mainstream disco songs and the new ‘comeback’ of the genre.

“It is too electronic,” he said, compared to the basic instrumentation of the late ’70s and early ’80s with a few wind instruments and the guitar-bass-drum format.

Next time you find yourself on campus, you may want to speak to Salazar about disco and learn something new or Shazam one of the songs he is playing. This genre of music is known for only being “dance” music, but such a simplistic labeling of the genre can discredit those artists that have made something more meaningful and complex that is worth paying attention to.

Here are five songs recommended by discogod_ himself from his curated Spotify playlist. Whether it is 12” single versions or extended mixes, there are plenty of songs to enjoy.

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5fvGoOa9PRq2UlJqlDjedQ

1. The Fruit Song by Jeannie Reynolds

“The song has a double entendre, it talks about bananas and other things but you get the real meaning,” Salazar mentioned. “It was common for disco songs to be provocative at that time.”

2. I Want Your Love (Dimitri from Paris remix) by CHIC

This is one of the long songs Salazar was referring to. “Nile Rodgers is the guitar player of the band,” he added. “He also started a group called Sister Sledge.” The group only managed to make one song produced by Rodgers, but recently he was featured in Daft Punk’s album “Random Access Memories” where his guitar playing is once more immortalized.

3. Romeo and Juliet by Alec R. Costandinos

“I would say all of Costandinos’s work is great because of the orchestration he has in his songs,” Salazar said. “His best work is the ‘Romeo and Juliet’ album, which is basically the entire story told through a disco in a non-stop format.”

4. Soul Makossa by Manu Dibango

“It is said to be the first disco song,” Salazar explained. “Michael Jackson actually stole the chorus from this in ‘Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin.’”

5. Open Sesame by Kool & The Gang

“This last song has amazing brass work,” Salazar said. “It contrasts against the later works they did where they simplified their sound. In general, it’s hard to pick because there just so much good disco songs that nobody has ever heard of before. Some of them are pretty good, amazing even, and some of them are so bad and cheesy that they are good too.”

***

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Hall Council’s Holiday Bash

DSU’s Hall Council presented Elf in a movie night for students Dec 3. The event was held in the Beacom Collaboration Space, and while turnout was low festivities were high. Hot chocolate was served with chocolate and caramel sauces as well as an abundance of mini marshmallows to add. There was also a design-your-own Christmas Cookie station complete with red, white, and green frosting as well as seasonal sprinkles.

Daniel Green and Mercedes Moeller sporting their holiday sweaters

The event doubled as an ugly sweater contest, though it wasn’t especially competitive. Daniel Green and Mercedes Moeller were the only two who arrived donning their most festive knitwear, and as such they were considered the winners.

The holiday classic Elf was a funny and welcome change from the looming stress of finals approaching, and while the event didn’t draw as big of a crowd as was expected Hall Council is hoping to have similar movie nights in the future.

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Editor’s Note: What We Do at the Review

Editor's Note: What We Do at the Review

The position of student journalist is in many respects a curious one. Those who sit in the position I am vacating — and its equivalents across other campus publications — are both hobbled and blessed by perhaps our only common trait: our youth.

Hobbled, because we are inexperienced, naive, and taken less seriously than our professional counterparts lining the pages of national publications. We aren’t breaking Watergate every week at the Review (and nor are the Daily, FoHo, or whichever other Stanford publications you might dip into), and nor do we claim to.

We are blessed, though, because with that inexperience comes both determination and whimsy. There is a special energy at our weekly Review meetings, where our staff argue, laugh, bellow, and pontificate about the issues of the day. I would be thrilled to be proven wrong, but I doubt that energy endures in many facets of adult, post-college life.

I entered student journalism because I enjoyed — and still enjoy — crafting sentences. I liked trying to put words together in interesting ways, manipulating them to express something persuasive, shocking, or clever. I do not flatter myself into thinking that I have succeeded very often at this, but trying nonetheless continues to appeal to me. I originally plied my trade at the Daily, writing a biweekly opinion column. I had no delusions of grandeur (or of readership, for that matter), but I appreciated the practice that the column gave me, the discipline its deadlines imposed. After a couple of months unloading essays into the digital void, however, I was approached by somebody at the Review, who convinced me that I could be doing more.

And what exactly do we do here at the Review? We certainly write articles, don’t get me wrong. This volume we have published journalism to be proud of. We took an excoriating look at Stanford’s dining policies, dating back to their inception, and proposed common-sense ways to improve them. We demanded an explanation for why Stanford’s much-touted new scholarship program failed to find a single humanities student worthy of recognition. We did extensive analysis of Stanford’s administrative bloat and investigated the rotten incentives behind it. We wondered why a Stanford administrator found the American flag, of all things, offensive.

But we have fun, too. This volume, we founded a religion when we didn’t like a university policy. We reviewed the best places to cram for a final. We showed you how an understanding of frat parties can lead to an understanding of national politics. We formed friendships among our staff, many of which will endure years after we’ve left Stanford. In short, we understood that being a student journalist is about writing important news stories, yes, but perhaps just as importantly it is also about not taking yourself too seriously.

The Review has cultivated something of a reputation for pushing boundaries. We don’t pretend to be otherwise. In the words of the great novelist Graham Greene: “Heresy is another word for freedom of thought.” On a college campus, where few of the heresies one can commit will be of relevance in the years to come, I would encourage our readers to embrace the same attitude.

As my time at this publication comes to an end, I couldn’t be more grateful for everything it has given me. I have given to it a good deal of my time and energy, but I have been repaid in full and then some. To my staff — thank you for arguing with me, pushing me, and for writing the terrific pieces that have filled this volume. To our readers — it is my humble hope that our material has been worth the time you spent reading our articles. And I wish a special good luck to my successor, Andrew Friedman, who will doubtless match and then exceed the achievements of this volume. The Review will never stop being the Review, but it is up to you now to make it your own.

Sam

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Editor’s Note: What We Do at the Review

Editor's Note: What We Do at the Review

The position of a student journalist is in many respects a curious one. Those who have occupied the role I am vacating — and its equivalents across other campus publications — are both hobbled and blessed by perhaps our only common trait: our youth.

Hobbled, because we are inexperienced, naive, and taken less seriously than our professional counterparts lining the pages of national publications. We aren’t breaking Watergate every week at the Review (and nor are the Daily, FoHo, or whichever other Stanford publications you might dip into), and nor do we claim to.

We are blessed, though, because with that inexperience comes both determination and whimsy. There is a special energy at our weekly Review meetings, where our staff argue, laugh, bellow, and pontificate about the issues of the day. I would be thrilled to be proven wrong, but I doubt that energy endures in many facets of adult, post-college life.

I entered student journalism because I enjoyed — and still enjoy — crafting sentences. I liked trying to put words together in interesting ways, manipulating them to express something persuasive, shocking, or clever. I do not flatter myself into thinking that I have succeeded very often at this, but trying nonetheless continues to appeal to me. I originally plied my trade at the Daily, writing a biweekly opinion column. I had no delusions of grandeur (or of readership, for that matter), but I appreciated the practice that the column gave me, the discipline its deadlines imposed. After a couple of months unloading essays into the digital void, however, I was approached by somebody at the Review, who convinced me that I could be doing more.

And what exactly do we do here at the Review? We certainly write articles, don’t get me wrong. This volume we have published journalism to be proud of. We took an excoriating look at Stanford’s dining policies, dating back to their inception, and proposed common-sense ways to improve them. We demanded an explanation for why Stanford’s much-touted new scholarship program failed to find a single humanities student worthy of recognition. We did extensive analysis of Stanford’s administrative bloat and investigated the rotten incentives behind it. We wondered why a Stanford administrator found the American flag, of all things, offensive.

But we have fun, too. This volume, we founded a religion when we didn’t like a university policy. We reviewed the best places to cram for a final. We showed you how an understanding of frat parties can lead to an understanding of national politics. We formed friendships among our staff, many of which will endure years after we’ve left Stanford. In short, we understood that being a student journalist is about writing important news stories, yes, but perhaps just as importantly it is also about not taking yourself too seriously.

The Review has cultivated something of a reputation for pushing boundaries. We don’t pretend to be otherwise. In the words of the great novelist Graham Greene: “Heresy is another word for freedom of thought.” On a college campus, where few of the heresies one can commit will be of relevance in the years to come, I would encourage our readers to embrace the same attitude.

As my time at this publication comes to an end, I couldn’t be more grateful for everything it has given me. I have given to it a good deal of my time and energy, but I have been repaid in full and then some. To my staff — thank you for arguing with me, pushing me, and for writing the terrific pieces that have filled this volume. To our readers — it is my humble hope that our material has been worth the time you spent reading our articles. And I wish a special good luck to my successor, Andrew Friedman, who will doubtless match and then exceed the achievements of this volume. The Review will never stop being the Review, but it is up to you now to make it your own.

Sam

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Hammond Ballet Company puts together a family experience for the holidays

The Hammond Ballet Company held its annual holiday performance of “The Nutcracker” with guest artists Alicia Mae Holloway and Saverio Pescucci.

The production was held on Dec. 7-8 at 7 p.m. in the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts.

The Hammond Ballet Company cast Annabelle Mack, a student at Albany Middle School, as Clara. Mack practiced two and a half months for this year’s production.

“The most rewarding part was knowing that I’m Clara, and I’m the star of the show, and at the end when I bowed, everyone cheered for me, and I was like, ‘Wow,’” said Mack.

Mack shared that the most difficult part of her performance was the snow scene.

“There was fake snow falling from the ceiling, and it makes it very slippery, so it’s kind of hard not to slip,” said Mack.

Some attendees made the event a family-bonding experience.

“It’s a special grandmother-granddaughter event every year,” said Paula Juneau, a Hammond resident.

According to Mack, the performance taught her to stay in character despite any problems.

“You can mess up, but you can’t show it,” said Mack. “You have to keep acting because the show must go on.”

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Column: Final Destination McKinney

No sleep ‘til Texas.

VSU football is headed to the national championship after winning a 30-24 slugfest against No. 11 Notre Dame College.

I now see why the Falcons of Notre Dame were undefeated coming into this game. They pulled out all the stops to win this game, but still fell short.

Falcons’ Freshman running back Jaleel McLaughlin proved that he will be a problem for Division II defenses for the next three years by rushing for 2,421 yards and 18 touchdowns in his first campaign.

These teams were throwing haymakers and it led to an exciting, but not a high scoring game and it was a character building win for the Blazers.

All season the Blazers have cruised to wins led by their high scoring offense but Saturday they had to rely on their defense.

Jamar Thompkins had a day, zipping through the Falcons’ defense for 145 yards and a touchdown but Thompkins and the Blazers’ offense isn’t the story.

It’s the defense.

The Black Swarm scored twice from a safety and a 100-yard David Brown interception return.

VSU’s defense only allowed seven points in the second half, which was a given due to Gavin Wilson’s punt being blocked and recovered on the 1-yard line.

Linebackers David Brown and Jameon Gaskin, who have been constants for the Blazers’ defense all season combined for fifteen tackles and 1.5 tackles for loss.

These two players showed that once the going gets tough for the offense, they’re who to call on to make big plays on the field to keep opposing offenses from getting in the endzone.

After finishing 5-4 a season ago, everyone was ready to write the Blazers off prior to the season.

The AFCA Division II Coaches rankings didn’t even feature the Blazers and in the Gulf South Conference the Blazers were ranked fifth.

We all see how that turned out.

The Blazers swept through all competition on the way to a national championship appearance.

Win or lose on Dec. 15 against No. 2 Ferris State, this will go down as one of the most memorable seasons in VSU football history.

We know that the Blazers won’t settle, though. They want the ring.

This is just chapter one of the dynasty that is brewing in Titletown, USA.

Written by Gerald Thomas III. Photo courtesy of VSU Athletics. 

For more sports  click here.

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Animation Chico captivates with contest

The lights darkened and the door shut. Spectators gazed forward at the bright screen in the small theater. Broken only by pangs of laughter and applause, the room felt still as each short film gave the audience a glimpse inside the mind of its creator.

Animation Chico hosted its fourth annual Animation Chico Film Festival at the Chico Theater Company on Saturday.

The organization looks to inform students and the public about the creative potential and affordability animation offers. Not every creative vision can be brought to life through typical film-making, but animation places no limits on the imagination—giving viewers a unique creative perspective in every piece.

“Anything you can imagine, you can create,” Josh Funk, co-director of Animation Chico, said.

Funk, who also teaches 2D animation at Chico State, wants to break the intimidation associated with creating animation. He seeks to bolster the animation community in Chico by bringing professional and student animators together and letting them learn from each other.

In addition to the organizers, a decent number of people moved around the small venue—some wore lanyards with animation still frames displayed on the front. The event provided contestants with lanyards that displayed what films they had created.

Animation Chico accepted 39 films to be considered in the contest. Chico State students and locals created some of the films; however, most were international submissions.

After being around for four years, the organization is starting to gain more traction online—increasing the quality and quantity of its submissions. Funk predicts that next year will be Animation Chico’s largest year.

The contest features various types of animation, including Experimental 2D animation, computer animation and stop-motion animation. It also offers three cash prizes for first place, second place and best student animation.

Guillermo Gómez, one of the more experienced contestants, came from Sunnyvale to present and discuss his latest short film,“The Crow and the Squirrel.” The film, which included humor and heavy feminist undertones, got a hefty applause.

He explained that the idea for the film came to him when he looked at his backyard and saw a squirrel and a crow facing each other. Once he began animating, he realized that he could make the project into something more meaningful.

Gómez—who spent months writing, drawing, animating and editing this piece—thinks that animation provides artists with more creative freedom at a lower cost, despite how long it takes to complete.

“I’ve always been mesmerized by the art form,” he said.

Gómez can bring anything he imagines to life through animation. He doesn’t need permits, insurance for expensive equipment or advanced set pieces. He creates most of his short films through drawings and still frames, he said.

As he puts it, animation “doesn’t involve as much as live action but, in a way, there’s a little bit more.”

Individuals who want to submit a film, contact or get involved in the next contest can visit Animation Chico’s website.

Grant Schmieding can be reached at artseditor@theorion.com or @G_Schmieding on Twitter.

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The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is not just one-sided

“From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free!” It’s a popular mantra, but have you thought about what it really means? What seemingly is a progressive call for the respect of Palestinian rights is rather a statement of intolerance calling for the complete destruction of the Jewish state. With progressive intentions, criticism of Israel often seamlessly transforms into its own form of hate with far-reaching consequences for the Jewish people as a whole. It is, therefore, important to differentiate between constructive criticism of Israel, which is encouraged, and that which leads to bigotry.

The role anti-Zionism has had in proliferating anti-Semitism cannot be justifiably ignored. Researchers from the nonpartisan AMCHA Initiative revealed campuses that experience greater anti-Israel protest are much more likely to experience anti-Semitism as well. So while not all protesters who shout for the destruction of Israel are anti-Semitic themselves, they nonetheless are facilitating a cause that contributes to rising anti-Semitism.

Criticizing Israel’s policies is reasonable, but it is important to recognize when criticism is rooted in anti-Semitism. Acclaimed human rights advocate Natan Sharansky created a “3D” test to determine when criticism of Israel becomes anti-Semitic. The first “D” is demonization, which includes blowing Israel’s abuses out of proportion, such as by comparing Israel’s policies to the genocide carried out by Adolf Hitler. The second “D” stands for double standards, which the United Nations is culpable of due to repeatedly singling out Israel for human rights violations, while despicably ignoring those by countries such as Syria, China, Iran and Russia, which are numerous and much more egregious than anything even Israel’s worst enemies have accused it of doing. The third “D” is delegitimization. It is anti-Semitic to still question the existence of Israel, while accepting the existence of other states with similar foundations.

Depicting the conflict as one-sided is misguided, as both Jews and Palestinians have a strong connection to the land. While Israel is constantly derided as colonialist, this is far from the truth as Jewish connection to the land is undeniable. Just last week, an ancient stone weight straight from the Torah with the inscription “beka” was unearthed in Israel. Israel is filled with historical artifacts of Jewish heritage, and there is little doubt that Jews had a rich historical presence there. Ironically, Muslims colonized the land for several centuries after conquering it and building the Dome of the Rock on the site of the ancient Jewish Temple. Nonetheless, after over a thousand years, both these peoples have a right to self-determination on this land.

Furthermore, while criticism of Israel is encouraged, blame must be equally shared. While Israel accepted a U.N. resolution to partition the land in 1948, Arab leadership did not and instead went to war. Moreover, Arab nations have to this day refused to integrate Palestinian refugees into their societies. Speaking volumes, Palestinians are the only refugees whose status passes hereditarily. In addition, Israel twice offered — in 2000 and 2008 — to establish Palestinian sovereignty in almost the entirety of the West Bank and East Jerusalem, as well as international rule over the Old City. However, the Palestinian Liberation Organization rejected these offers, and in 2000, the group turned a chance at peace into a spring of violent attacks against Israeli civilians. The Palestinian Liberation Organization’s response was significantly influenced by the damage inflicted on their popularity for engaging in peace talks with Israel. Palestinian leadership indoctrinates its citizens with hate while simultaneously denying them basic human rights. Therefore, while criticism of Israel is important, ignoring the failures of Arab leadership is both dishonest and unproductive.

In the past few months, anti-Semitic crimes have occurred seemingly every day. A report last month revealed that hate crimes against Jews in Canada have spiked by 60 percent since last year. The link between anti-Israel protests and the rise is anti-Semitism in undeniable. So while intersectionality stands for solidarity among all disenfranchised groups, many fail to realize that they are supporting one marginalized group at the expense of another.

Michael Harel is a senior majoring in political science.

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The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is not just one-sided

“From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free!” It’s a popular mantra, but have you thought about what it really means? What seemingly is a progressive call for the respect of Palestinian rights is rather a statement of intolerance calling for the complete destruction of the Jewish state. With progressive intentions, criticism of Israel often seamlessly transforms into its own form of hate with far-reaching consequences for the Jewish people as a whole. It is, therefore, important to differentiate between constructive criticism of Israel, which is encouraged, and that which leads to bigotry.

The role anti-Zionism has had in proliferating anti-Semitism cannot be justifiably ignored. Researchers from the nonpartisan AMCHA Initiative revealed campuses that experience greater anti-Israel protest are much more likely to experience anti-Semitism as well. So while not all protesters who shout for the destruction of Israel are anti-Semitic themselves, they nonetheless are facilitating a cause that contributes to rising anti-Semitism.

Criticizing Israel’s policies is reasonable, but it is important to recognize when criticism is rooted in anti-Semitism. Acclaimed human rights advocate Natan Sharansky created a “3D” test to determine when criticism of Israel becomes anti-Semitic. The first “D” is demonization, which includes blowing Israel’s abuses out of proportion, such as by comparing Israel’s policies to the genocide carried out by Adolf Hitler. The second “D” stands for double standards, which the United Nations is culpable of due to repeatedly singling out Israel for human rights violations, while despicably ignoring those by countries such as Syria, China, Iran and Russia, which are numerous and much more egregious than anything even Israel’s worst enemies have accused it of doing. The third “D” is delegitimization. It is anti-Semitic to still question the existence of Israel, while accepting the existence of other states with similar foundations.

Depicting the conflict as one-sided is misguided, as both Jews and Palestinians have a strong connection to the land. While Israel is constantly derided as colonialist, this is far from the truth as Jewish connection to the land is undeniable. Just last week, an ancient stone weight straight from the Torah with the inscription “beka” was unearthed in Israel. Israel is filled with historical artifacts of Jewish heritage, and there is little doubt that Jews had a rich historical presence there. Ironically, Muslims colonized the land for several centuries after conquering it and building the Dome of the Rock on the site of the ancient Jewish Temple. Nonetheless, after over a thousand years, both these peoples have a right to self-determination on this land.

Furthermore, while criticism of Israel is encouraged, blame must be equally shared. While Israel accepted a U.N. resolution to partition the land in 1948, Arab leadership did not and instead went to war. Moreover, Arab nations have to this day refused to integrate Palestinian refugees into their societies. Speaking volumes, Palestinians are the only refugees whose status passes hereditarily. In addition, Israel twice offered — in 2000 and 2008 — to establish Palestinian sovereignty in almost the entirety of the West Bank and East Jerusalem, as well as international rule over the Old City. However, the Palestinian Liberation Organization rejected these offers, and in 2000, the group turned a chance at peace into a spring of violent attacks against Israeli civilians. The Palestinian Liberation Organization’s response was significantly influenced by the damage inflicted on their popularity for engaging in peace talks with Israel. Palestinian leadership indoctrinates its citizens with hate while simultaneously denying them basic human rights. Therefore, while criticism of Israel is important, ignoring the failures of Arab leadership is both dishonest and unproductive.

In the past few months, anti-Semitic crimes have occurred seemingly every day. A report last month revealed that hate crimes against Jews in Canada have spiked by 60 percent since last year. The link between anti-Israel protests and the rise is anti-Semitism in undeniable. So while intersectionality stands for solidarity among all disenfranchised groups, many fail to realize that they are supporting one marginalized group at the expense of another.

Michael Harel is a senior majoring in political science.

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Opinion: The Tale of Two Twitters

Social media presents us with the opportunity to brand ourselves, both personally and professionally.

Twitter.

This is the source of comical Buzzfeed articles featuring the funniest tweets of the week; it’s the source of memes, political debates, news articles, sports updates and more. Even still, Twitter is also a place where potential employers go to see how you interact with others on that particular platform. According to Career Builder, 70 percent of employers look at employee candidates’ social media platforms. This can be used to your advantage if you conduct yourself properly. However, Twitter is inherently a social platform.Two questions arise: do you use Twitter for both personal and professional purposes, or do you create two separate Twitter accounts?

A personal brand is important. A professional brand is important. Mending the two is imperative. I personally have one Twitter that I use for both personal and professional branding. It’s important to me that potential employers see and understand both of what I’m interested in professionally as well as what makes me who I am.

In Laura Lake’s article “What is a Personal Brand?” she says to “balance your social media presence with business-related updates and personal updates. That way others will see you as an established professional but also get a sneak peek into your personal life and what makes you tick.”

Only letting employers see one side of your brand can hurt you in the long run. On many job applications, there is a place to provide your Twitter handle. Potential employers are looking to get a handle (pun intended) on you before they have a chance to talk to you. Combining your personal and professional images is a prime way to show them what sets you apart from other candidates.

Jamie Roebuck-Joseph, a senior journalism major, has two separate Twitter accounts: one for personal use and one for her professional brand. “The benefit of having two Twitters is the freedom,” Roebuck-Joseph said. “It’s not that I have a bad alter ego or something that I’m trying to hide from my employers, but I do think having a Twitter dedicated to my professional life versus my personal life helps to keep me organized.”

In Kimberly Schneiderman’s article “5 Tips to Boost Your Personal and Professional Brand,” she argues that there is no difference between your personal and your professional brand. “No matter how much we try to separate our personal and professional selves, it’s impossible to leave one identity completely at home or at the office,” Schneiderman said. “When thinking about your professional brand, leverage those personal attributes that come naturally to you. When you fully combine personal and professional identities to build your brand, it becomes easier to remain completely authentic.”

It is important to show employers your most authentic self. That means ensuring that both your personal and professional personas are portrayed on your social media. Even if you do have two separate accounts like Roebuck-Joseph, whatever you put out on the professional account should still portray who you are and what you’re interested in.

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Owls lose to South Dakota State in FCS quarterfinals

The Kennesaw State football team lost 27-17 to South Dakota State on Saturday, Dec. 8, falling in the quarterfinals of the FCS playoffs for the second consecutive season.

Trailing 20-3 in the fourth quarter, the Owls rallied to make the score 20-17 before giving up a final touchdown late in the game.

The loss marks the end of an era for the program, as 18 players from the original signing class played their final game.

Starting quarterback and Walter Payton Award finalist Chandler Burks faced an injury in the second quarter, but Daniel David entered the game and helped the Owls score.

“It’s a tough day,” said head coach Brian Bohannon. “I’m proud of the seniors. They did things that people normally wouldn’t do to lay a foundation for something that hopefully we can continue to build on.”

In only their fourth season, the football team won their second straight conference championship and earned two home playoff games this season.

The Owls finish the season averaging over 350 rushing yards per game and 43 points per game.

The loss marks the first home defeat for the Owls since Oct. 15, 2016.

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Owls lose to South Dakota State in FCS quarterfinals

The Kennesaw State football team lost 27-17 to South Dakota State on Saturday, Dec. 8, falling in the quarterfinals of the FCS playoffs for the second consecutive season.

Trailing 20-3 in the fourth quarter, the Owls rallied to make the score 20-17 before giving up a final touchdown late in the game.

The loss marks the end of an era for the program, as 18 players from the original signing class played their final game.

Starting quarterback and Walter Payton Award finalist Chandler Burks faced an injury in the second quarter, but Daniel David entered the game and helped the Owls score.

“It’s a tough day,” said head coach Brian Bohannon. “I’m proud of the seniors. They did things that people normally wouldn’t do to lay a foundation for something that hopefully we can continue to build on.”

In only their fourth season, the football team won their second straight conference championship and earned two home playoff games this season.

The Owls finish the season averaging over 350 rushing yards per game and 43 points per game.

The loss marks the first home defeat for the Owls since Oct. 15, 2016.

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MEN’S BASKETBALL: With 16 Steals, No. 3 Duke Pulls Away for 91–58 Win

Facing Yale for the third time since the 2015–16 season, the No. 3 Duke team notched its third straight win, crushing the Elis 91–58.

Travelling to Durham, North Carolina, the Bulldogs (4–3, 0–0 Ivy) understood the enormous challenge that the Blue Devils (9–1, 0–0 ACC) posed. Although they kept pace with the Blue Devils for most of the first half, relentless ball pressure and Yale’s lack of offensive composure ultimately allowed Duke to significantly expand its lead in the second half. Outscored 50–26 in the second frame, the Elis ultimately suffered a 91–58 defeat, committing 23 turnovers and gifting Duke 24 points off of lost possessions.

Duke’s talented first-year trio of future NBA forwards — 6-foot-7-inch RJ Barrett, 6-foot-8-inch Cam Reddish and 6-foot-7-inch Zion Williamson — drew a loud, sold-out crowd of 9,314 to Cameron Indoor Stadium Saturday night, living up to the crowd’s expectations by combining for 60 of Duke’s 91 points.

“It’s all about keeping our composure,” head coach James Jones said. “I didn’t think we did a great job of that at times, and that really hurt us. They went on a couple of runs that, because of our lack of poise and composure, hurt us. You look at the score, and I don’t know that that’s completely indicative of how we played, but we could have certainly been better in the last 10 minutes, and we were not. That’s something that we just need to learn from.”

The Elis looked calm and collected at the start of the first half, trading buckets with the powerhouse Blue Devils in a primetime environment. Yale maintained a 22–21 lead with 8:06 remaining in the frame. Guard Miye Oni ’20 took control of the offense on numerous isolation plays and carved his way to the hole for two-point scores despite overwhelming defensive pressure.

Duke, however, found its defensive rhythm, forcing 16 Bulldog turnovers in the first 20 minutes of play. Capitalizing off 12 first-half steals, the strikingly athletic Blue Devils flew down the court and punished Yale on the fast break. By the game’s end, Duke had scored 31 fast-break points compared to Yale’s nine in transition.

The Blue Devils applied unrelenting defensive pressure, as first-year guard Tre Jones shadowed point guard Alex Copeland ’19 bringing the basketball up the court. Especially in the second half, Duke occasionally sent a second defender on the ball handler once they crossed half-court, and Yale appeared uncomfortable on offense throughout. The team shot 35.4 percent from the field and 13.0 percent from the three-point line — both season-lows.

“It all starts with his pressure on the ball,” Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “Copeland’s a real good guard, but he had to fight Tre the whole night, and then that makes it easier for all our other guys to play defense.”

Three-quarters of the way through the first half, Duke began to increase its lead. Guard Trey Phills ’19 and captain and forward Blake Reynolds ’19 each picked up their second foul within seconds, putting the Blue Devils into the bonus and sending Yale’s senior duo to the bench with foul trouble. And fast-break points followed, as the Blue Devils continued to strip the Elis of possession on offense to capitalize on the other end.

Yale outrebounded Duke in the first half, outmatching the Blue Devils’ size under the rim by a margin of 24 to 20. Though the long and athletic forwards Javin DeLaurier, Barrett and Reddish combined for seven boards, Oni himself led Yale with as many rebounds in the half. Bruner and Atkinson chipped in five and four, respectively, while Williamson led Duke with four first-half boards.

As the half progressed, Oni continued to propel the Elis on offense but found himself in foul trouble. After sitting for most of the second half with four fouls, he re-entered the contest with 9:12 left in the game, joined by Bruner, who also had four fouls. Much to Cameron’s delight, Oni fouled out with just under seven minutes to go, providing a symbolic end to the slim chance of an Eli comeback.

“[Oni’s] a great player,” Duke forward and captain Jack White said. “It was just a battle. Both teams wanted to win. It gets a bit chippy sometimes, which just comes out of passion. He played a good game, and we were just trying to match that passion and energy with our own.”

Continued Yale turnovers and the team’s inability to stop Williamson and Barrett sealed the win for Duke, as impressive drives and emphatic dunks ignited the Cameron crowd, which chanted “We Want Harvard!” in the final minutes. With the final score cementing itself at 91–58, the star-studded Blue Devils — who have not lost a nonconference game at home since Feb. 26, 2000 — have now won eight games in the 2018–19 campaign by way of blowout.

Although the Elis fell by 33 points, they managed to drown out the deafening noise of Cameron and hold their own in the first half against a top-three ranked opponent. Coach Krzyzewski, who was disappointed by his own team’s performance in the first half, was quick to credit Yale.

“We beat a really good team tonight,” Krzyzewski said. “They’re very well coached. Not well coached, very well coached. They have a veteran team. They’re a good group; they’re really a good group.”

On Tuesday night, Yale will turn its attention to a date with Albany back at home at the John J. Lee Amphitheater.

Cris Zillo | cris.zillo@yale.edu .

William McCormack | william.mccormack@yale.edu .

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University mistakenly blocks 18 reports of sexual misconduct

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) announced on Wednesday that an issue with its website had mistakenly blocked it from receiving 18 reports of sexual misconduct, which took place between January 2016 and October 2018.

According to a University official, OIE was first alerted to this problem on Nov. 29. Two complainants had contacted the Office after failing to receive a message acknowledging that their online report had been received. The University official stated that OIE then discovered that a filter on the website was preventing some online reports from being forwarded to the Office and that the reports were placed in a quarantine folder. This folder is intended to hold bot-generated messages that are not relevant to OIE.

The University official clarified that OIE found 26 reports of sexual misconduct in the quarantine folder, but eight of those cases had been reported to OIE in other ways.

OIE apologized for the error on its website and wrote that it would work to fix the problem and update the crime logs and annual reports.

“On behalf of the university and the staff of OIE, we are sincerely sorry for this error and for the distress it may have caused,” the website reads. “Anyone who takes the step to file a report deserves and should expect timely action and response, and we are taking immediate steps to support those whose reports were mistakenly blocked.”

Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU) Co-Directors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant explained that though they were frustrated upon learning about this issue, SARU has been working with OIE to prevent similar issues in the future and repair some of the damage that may have been caused.

“It’s completely unacceptable,” Viswanathan said. “People are placing a lot of trust in the office by going out and reporting. It’s such a difficult thing to do in the aftermath of trauma and assault. The fact that not only did they somehow lose 18 reports but also that for two years nobody noticed is kind of scary.”

She added that investigating the reports now would likely be more difficult for the Office because complainants and witnesses may not remember specific details about an incident after such a significant amount of time has passed.

According to the University official, this error did not violate the Clery Act, which requires that college campuses report crime statistics. The official explained that this was because OIE and Campus Safety and Security determined that none of the 18 cases required a time-sensitive warning announcement to be sent to the University community.

Radant felt that though the incident was a mistake, it showed negligence on the part of the University.

“We are going in the exact opposite direction of interpreting Title IX that we need to be going. Cases like this where there’s just gross negligence… show that we need to be strengthening Title IX protections and working a lot harder on a national level to empower schools to respond adequately to sexual violence,” she said.

According to the University official, there were a total of 791 reports submitted to OIE from January 2016 through October 2018, which were reported either in-person, over the phone, via email or through the website. Out of the total number of reports submitted, the 18 blocked reports constituted 2.28 percent.

Out of the 18 reports that OIE failed to process, two were submitted in 2016, two in 2017 and the remaining 14 in 2018. The Office wrote that upon learning of the error, it immediately began addressing all the reports.

“OIE has contacted or attempted to contact all those who submitted these reports and will provide expedited support and services to address any of their concerns immediately,” the website reads.

Viswanathan urged the University and OIE to take steps to ensure that the people who submitted the 18 reports were supported in any upcoming investigations.

“Engage other University services to make sure that the damage that has been done in not responding to these complaints is addressed,” she said. “Provide more robust mental health resources, whatever they may look like in an individual case. Use the full force of the Office to make sure that people are safe.”

The University official explained that in cases where the complainants had left the University or were unaffiliated, OIE will provide the complainant with resources and take action toward the respondent to the extent possible. The official also noted that in cases where the respondent is no longer affiliated with the University, the University could retroactively take action through methods including leaving a notation on the respondent’s transcript; revoking their degree; banning them from campus; and limiting their access to Hopkins as an alumnus.

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University mistakenly blocks 18 reports of sexual misconduct

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) announced on Wednesday that an issue with its website had mistakenly blocked it from receiving 18 reports of sexual misconduct, which took place between January 2016 and October 2018.

According to a University official, OIE was first alerted to this problem on Nov. 29. Two complainants had contacted the Office after failing to receive a message acknowledging that their online report had been received. The University official stated that OIE then discovered that a filter on the website was preventing some online reports from being forwarded to the Office and that the reports were placed in a quarantine folder. This folder is intended to hold bot-generated messages that are not relevant to OIE.

The University official clarified that OIE found 26 reports of sexual misconduct in the quarantine folder, but eight of those cases had been reported to OIE in other ways.

OIE apologized for the error on its website and wrote that it would work to fix the problem and update the crime logs and annual reports.

“On behalf of the university and the staff of OIE, we are sincerely sorry for this error and for the distress it may have caused,” the website reads. “Anyone who takes the step to file a report deserves and should expect timely action and response, and we are taking immediate steps to support those whose reports were mistakenly blocked.”

Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU) Co-Directors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant explained that though they were frustrated upon learning about this issue, SARU has been working with OIE to prevent similar issues in the future and repair some of the damage that may have been caused.

“It’s completely unacceptable,” Viswanathan said. “People are placing a lot of trust in the office by going out and reporting. It’s such a difficult thing to do in the aftermath of trauma and assault. The fact that not only did they somehow lose 18 reports but also that for two years nobody noticed is kind of scary.”

She added that investigating the reports now would likely be more difficult for the Office because complainants and witnesses may not remember specific details about an incident after such a significant amount of time has passed.

According to the University official, this error did not violate the Clery Act, which requires that college campuses report crime statistics. The official explained that this was because OIE and Campus Safety and Security determined that none of the 18 cases required a time-sensitive warning announcement to be sent to the University community.

Radant felt that though the incident was a mistake, it showed negligence on the part of the University.

“We are going in the exact opposite direction of interpreting Title IX that we need to be going. Cases like this where there’s just gross negligence… show that we need to be strengthening Title IX protections and working a lot harder on a national level to empower schools to respond adequately to sexual violence,” she said.

According to the University official, there were a total of 791 reports submitted to OIE from January 2016 through October 2018, which were reported either in-person, over the phone, via email or through the website. Out of the total number of reports submitted, the 18 blocked reports constituted 2.28 percent.

Out of the 18 reports that OIE failed to process, two were submitted in 2016, two in 2017 and the remaining 14 in 2018. The Office wrote that upon learning of the error, it immediately began addressing all the reports.

“OIE has contacted or attempted to contact all those who submitted these reports and will provide expedited support and services to address any of their concerns immediately,” the website reads.

Viswanathan urged the University and OIE to take steps to ensure that the people who submitted the 18 reports were supported in any upcoming investigations.

“Engage other University services to make sure that the damage that has been done in not responding to these complaints is addressed,” she said. “Provide more robust mental health resources, whatever they may look like in an individual case. Use the full force of the Office to make sure that people are safe.”

The University official explained that in cases where the complainants had left the University or were unaffiliated, OIE will provide the complainant with resources and take action toward the respondent to the extent possible. The official also noted that in cases where the respondent is no longer affiliated with the University, the University could retroactively take action through methods including leaving a notation on the respondent’s transcript; revoking their degree; banning them from campus; and limiting their access to Hopkins as an alumnus.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

University mistakenly blocks 18 reports of sexual misconduct

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) announced on Wednesday that an issue with its website had mistakenly blocked it from receiving 18 reports of sexual misconduct, which took place between January 2016 and October 2018.

According to a University official, OIE was first alerted to this problem on Nov. 29. Two complainants had contacted the Office after failing to receive a message acknowledging that their online report had been received. The University official stated that OIE then discovered that a filter on the website was preventing some online reports from being forwarded to the Office and that the reports were placed in a quarantine folder. This folder is intended to hold bot-generated messages that are not relevant to OIE.

The University official clarified that OIE found 26 reports of sexual misconduct in the quarantine folder, but eight of those cases had been reported to OIE in other ways.

OIE apologized for the error on its website and wrote that it would work to fix the problem and update the crime logs and annual reports.

“On behalf of the university and the staff of OIE, we are sincerely sorry for this error and for the distress it may have caused,” the website reads. “Anyone who takes the step to file a report deserves and should expect timely action and response, and we are taking immediate steps to support those whose reports were mistakenly blocked.”

Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU) Co-Directors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant explained that though they were frustrated upon learning about this issue, SARU has been working with OIE to prevent similar issues in the future and repair some of the damage that may have been caused.

“It’s completely unacceptable,” Viswanathan said. “People are placing a lot of trust in the office by going out and reporting. It’s such a difficult thing to do in the aftermath of trauma and assault. The fact that not only did they somehow lose 18 reports but also that for two years nobody noticed is kind of scary.”

She added that investigating the reports now would likely be more difficult for the Office because complainants and witnesses may not remember specific details about an incident after such a significant amount of time has passed.

According to the University official, this error did not violate the Clery Act, which requires that college campuses report crime statistics. The official explained that this was because OIE and Campus Safety and Security determined that none of the 18 cases required a time-sensitive warning announcement to be sent to the University community.

Radant felt that though the incident was a mistake, it showed negligence on the part of the University.

“We are going in the exact opposite direction of interpreting Title IX that we need to be going. Cases like this where there’s just gross negligence… show that we need to be strengthening Title IX protections and working a lot harder on a national level to empower schools to respond adequately to sexual violence,” she said.

According to the University official, there were a total of 791 reports submitted to OIE from January 2016 through October 2018, which were reported either in-person, over the phone, via email or through the website. Out of the total number of reports submitted, the 18 blocked reports constituted 2.28 percent.

Out of the 18 reports that OIE failed to process, two were submitted in 2016, two in 2017 and the remaining 14 in 2018. The Office wrote that upon learning of the error, it immediately began addressing all the reports.

“OIE has contacted or attempted to contact all those who submitted these reports and will provide expedited support and services to address any of their concerns immediately,” the website reads.

Viswanathan urged the University and OIE to take steps to ensure that the people who submitted the 18 reports were supported in any upcoming investigations.

“Engage other University services to make sure that the damage that has been done in not responding to these complaints is addressed,” she said. “Provide more robust mental health resources, whatever they may look like in an individual case. Use the full force of the Office to make sure that people are safe.”

The University official explained that in cases where the complainants had left the University or were unaffiliated, OIE will provide the complainant with resources and take action toward the respondent to the extent possible. The official also noted that in cases where the respondent is no longer affiliated with the University, the University could retroactively take action through methods including leaving a notation on the respondent’s transcript; revoking their degree; banning them from campus; and limiting their access to Hopkins as an alumnus.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

University mistakenly blocks 18 reports of sexual misconduct

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) announced on Wednesday that an issue with its website had mistakenly blocked it from receiving 18 reports of sexual misconduct, which took place between January 2016 and October 2018.

According to a University official, OIE was first alerted to this problem on Nov. 29. Two complainants had contacted the Office after failing to receive a message acknowledging that their online report had been received. The University official stated that OIE then discovered that a filter on the website was preventing some online reports from being forwarded to the Office and that the reports were placed in a quarantine folder. This folder is intended to hold bot-generated messages that are not relevant to OIE.

The University official clarified that OIE found 26 reports of sexual misconduct in the quarantine folder, but eight of those cases had been reported to OIE in other ways.

OIE apologized for the error on its website and wrote that it would work to fix the problem and update the crime logs and annual reports.

“On behalf of the university and the staff of OIE, we are sincerely sorry for this error and for the distress it may have caused,” the website reads. “Anyone who takes the step to file a report deserves and should expect timely action and response, and we are taking immediate steps to support those whose reports were mistakenly blocked.”

Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU) Co-Directors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant explained that though they were frustrated upon learning about this issue, SARU has been working with OIE to prevent similar issues in the future and repair some of the damage that may have been caused.

“It’s completely unacceptable,” Viswanathan said. “People are placing a lot of trust in the office by going out and reporting. It’s such a difficult thing to do in the aftermath of trauma and assault. The fact that not only did they somehow lose 18 reports but also that for two years nobody noticed is kind of scary.”

She added that investigating the reports now would likely be more difficult for the Office because complainants and witnesses may not remember specific details about an incident after such a significant amount of time has passed.

According to the University official, this error did not violate the Clery Act, which requires that college campuses report crime statistics. The official explained that this was because OIE and Campus Safety and Security determined that none of the 18 cases required a time-sensitive warning announcement to be sent to the University community.

Radant felt that though the incident was a mistake, it showed negligence on the part of the University.

“We are going in the exact opposite direction of interpreting Title IX that we need to be going. Cases like this where there’s just gross negligence… show that we need to be strengthening Title IX protections and working a lot harder on a national level to empower schools to respond adequately to sexual violence,” she said.

According to the University official, there were a total of 791 reports submitted to OIE from January 2016 through October 2018, which were reported either in-person, over the phone, via email or through the website. Out of the total number of reports submitted, the 18 blocked reports constituted 2.28 percent.

Out of the 18 reports that OIE failed to process, two were submitted in 2016, two in 2017 and the remaining 14 in 2018. The Office wrote that upon learning of the error, it immediately began addressing all the reports.

“OIE has contacted or attempted to contact all those who submitted these reports and will provide expedited support and services to address any of their concerns immediately,” the website reads.

Viswanathan urged the University and OIE to take steps to ensure that the people who submitted the 18 reports were supported in any upcoming investigations.

“Engage other University services to make sure that the damage that has been done in not responding to these complaints is addressed,” she said. “Provide more robust mental health resources, whatever they may look like in an individual case. Use the full force of the Office to make sure that people are safe.”

The University official explained that in cases where the complainants had left the University or were unaffiliated, OIE will provide the complainant with resources and take action toward the respondent to the extent possible. The official also noted that in cases where the respondent is no longer affiliated with the University, the University could retroactively take action through methods including leaving a notation on the respondent’s transcript; revoking their degree; banning them from campus; and limiting their access to Hopkins as an alumnus.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

University mistakenly blocks 18 reports of sexual misconduct

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) announced on Wednesday that an issue with its website had mistakenly blocked it from receiving 18 reports of sexual misconduct, which took place between January 2016 and October 2018.

According to a University official, OIE was first alerted to this problem on Nov. 29. Two complainants had contacted the Office after failing to receive a message acknowledging that their online report had been received. The University official stated that OIE then discovered that a filter on the website was preventing some online reports from being forwarded to the Office and that the reports were placed in a quarantine folder. This folder is intended to hold bot-generated messages that are not relevant to OIE.

The University official clarified that OIE found 26 reports of sexual misconduct in the quarantine folder, but eight of those cases had been reported to OIE in other ways.

OIE apologized for the error on its website and wrote that it would work to fix the problem and update the crime logs and annual reports.

“On behalf of the university and the staff of OIE, we are sincerely sorry for this error and for the distress it may have caused,” the website reads. “Anyone who takes the step to file a report deserves and should expect timely action and response, and we are taking immediate steps to support those whose reports were mistakenly blocked.”

Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU) Co-Directors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant explained that though they were frustrated upon learning about this issue, SARU has been working with OIE to prevent similar issues in the future and repair some of the damage that may have been caused.

“It’s completely unacceptable,” Viswanathan said. “People are placing a lot of trust in the office by going out and reporting. It’s such a difficult thing to do in the aftermath of trauma and assault. The fact that not only did they somehow lose 18 reports but also that for two years nobody noticed is kind of scary.”

She added that investigating the reports now would likely be more difficult for the Office because complainants and witnesses may not remember specific details about an incident after such a significant amount of time has passed.

According to the University official, this error did not violate the Clery Act, which requires that college campuses report crime statistics. The official explained that this was because OIE and Campus Safety and Security determined that none of the 18 cases required a time-sensitive warning announcement to be sent to the University community.

Radant felt that though the incident was a mistake, it showed negligence on the part of the University.

“We are going in the exact opposite direction of interpreting Title IX that we need to be going. Cases like this where there’s just gross negligence… show that we need to be strengthening Title IX protections and working a lot harder on a national level to empower schools to respond adequately to sexual violence,” she said.

According to the University official, there were a total of 791 reports submitted to OIE from January 2016 through October 2018, which were reported either in-person, over the phone, via email or through the website. Out of the total number of reports submitted, the 18 blocked reports constituted 2.28 percent.

Out of the 18 reports that OIE failed to process, two were submitted in 2016, two in 2017 and the remaining 14 in 2018. The Office wrote that upon learning of the error, it immediately began addressing all the reports.

“OIE has contacted or attempted to contact all those who submitted these reports and will provide expedited support and services to address any of their concerns immediately,” the website reads.

Viswanathan urged the University and OIE to take steps to ensure that the people who submitted the 18 reports were supported in any upcoming investigations.

“Engage other University services to make sure that the damage that has been done in not responding to these complaints is addressed,” she said. “Provide more robust mental health resources, whatever they may look like in an individual case. Use the full force of the Office to make sure that people are safe.”

The University official explained that in cases where the complainants had left the University or were unaffiliated, OIE will provide the complainant with resources and take action toward the respondent to the extent possible. The official also noted that in cases where the respondent is no longer affiliated with the University, the University could retroactively take action through methods including leaving a notation on the respondent’s transcript; revoking their degree; banning them from campus; and limiting their access to Hopkins as an alumnus.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

University mistakenly blocks 18 reports of sexual misconduct

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) announced on Wednesday that an issue with its website had mistakenly blocked it from receiving 18 reports of sexual misconduct, which took place between January 2016 and October 2018.

According to a University official, OIE was first alerted to this problem on Nov. 29. Two complainants had contacted the Office after failing to receive a message acknowledging that their online report had been received. The University official stated that OIE then discovered that a filter on the website was preventing some online reports from being forwarded to the Office and that the reports were placed in a quarantine folder. This folder is intended to hold bot-generated messages that are not relevant to OIE.

The University official clarified that OIE found 26 reports of sexual misconduct in the quarantine folder, but eight of those cases had been reported to OIE in other ways.

OIE apologized for the error on its website and wrote that it would work to fix the problem and update the crime logs and annual reports.

“On behalf of the university and the staff of OIE, we are sincerely sorry for this error and for the distress it may have caused,” the website reads. “Anyone who takes the step to file a report deserves and should expect timely action and response, and we are taking immediate steps to support those whose reports were mistakenly blocked.”

Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU) Co-Directors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant explained that though they were frustrated upon learning about this issue, SARU has been working with OIE to prevent similar issues in the future and repair some of the damage that may have been caused.

“It’s completely unacceptable,” Viswanathan said. “People are placing a lot of trust in the office by going out and reporting. It’s such a difficult thing to do in the aftermath of trauma and assault. The fact that not only did they somehow lose 18 reports but also that for two years nobody noticed is kind of scary.”

She added that investigating the reports now would likely be more difficult for the Office because complainants and witnesses may not remember specific details about an incident after such a significant amount of time has passed.

According to the University official, this error did not violate the Clery Act, which requires that college campuses report crime statistics. The official explained that this was because OIE and Campus Safety and Security determined that none of the 18 cases required a time-sensitive warning announcement to be sent to the University community.

Radant felt that though the incident was a mistake, it showed negligence on the part of the University.

“We are going in the exact opposite direction of interpreting Title IX that we need to be going. Cases like this where there’s just gross negligence… show that we need to be strengthening Title IX protections and working a lot harder on a national level to empower schools to respond adequately to sexual violence,” she said.

According to the University official, there were a total of 791 reports submitted to OIE from January 2016 through October 2018, which were reported either in-person, over the phone, via email or through the website. Out of the total number of reports submitted, the 18 blocked reports constituted 2.28 percent.

Out of the 18 reports that OIE failed to process, two were submitted in 2016, two in 2017 and the remaining 14 in 2018. The Office wrote that upon learning of the error, it immediately began addressing all the reports.

“OIE has contacted or attempted to contact all those who submitted these reports and will provide expedited support and services to address any of their concerns immediately,” the website reads.

Viswanathan urged the University and OIE to take steps to ensure that the people who submitted the 18 reports were supported in any upcoming investigations.

“Engage other University services to make sure that the damage that has been done in not responding to these complaints is addressed,” she said. “Provide more robust mental health resources, whatever they may look like in an individual case. Use the full force of the Office to make sure that people are safe.”

The University official explained that in cases where the complainants had left the University or were unaffiliated, OIE will provide the complainant with resources and take action toward the respondent to the extent possible. The official also noted that in cases where the respondent is no longer affiliated with the University, the University could retroactively take action through methods including leaving a notation on the respondent’s transcript; revoking their degree; banning them from campus; and limiting their access to Hopkins as an alumnus.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball falters in overtime against Toledo

The Marshall men’s basketball team used a second-half comeback Saturday at the Cam Henderson Center to take the Toledo Rockets to overtime, but the Herd ultimately surrendered a 75-74 loss.

“Mentally, we weren’t there,” Marshall head coach Dan D’Antoni said. “You can’t go down 19 points playing a team that’s 8-1 and think you’re going to come back and win.”

The loss dropped the Thundering Herd to 5-4 on the season, while Toledo elevated its record to 9-1.

D’Antoni’s team struggled offensively in the first half and the Herd went into the locker room down 41-23. 23 points is the least the Herd has scored in a half this season. Marshall shot 35.7 percent from the field in the first half and made only one first-half 3-pointer out of 11 attempts.

The lone 3-point basket came from sophomore forward Jannson Williams with just minutes left before halftime. Additionally in the first half, the Herd shot 10-for-28 from the field and 2-for-9  from the free-throw line.

Marshall’s first half shooting woes were summarized by a corner 3-point attempt from sophomore forward Mikel Beyers that hit the side of the backboard instead of the bottom of the net.

In the second half, Marshall established momentum with a pair of quick 3-pointers from senior guard Jon Elmore. With the basket, Marshall chopped away at Toledo’s 21-point lead—its largest of the contest.

After Elmore missed a 3-pointer in the first half and went 0-for-2 from the free-throw line, he hit four second-half 3-pointers and ended the game with 21 points as he helped pull his team back into the game.

Toledo went on to eventually lose its large lead with just under six minutes remaining in regulation, a feat the Rockets’ head coach Ted Kowalczyk said he attributed to Marshall’s notoriously loud fanbase.

“I play in a lot of places and I don’t know that I’ve seen a better fanbase,” Kowalczyk said. “What (Marshall has) going here is special. It’s a fun atmosphere, it’s a fun way to play and, unfortunately, our guys didn’t handle it well when (Marshall) got the fans going.”

Marshall senior guard Rondale Watson played an impactful role in his team’s comeback and finished the game with 14 points and 10 rebounds to record his first-career double-double. Though he had a career-night, Watson said he was more focused on the fact that his team lost.

“I’ve never been a stats guy,” Watson said. “I’m a winner guy. I like to win. When we win, we all look good. When we lose, nobody looks good. I just wanted to win and we came up short.”

After its disastrous first half, Marshall held a five-point lead with less than a minute left in the second half. Toledo managed to cut Marshall’s small lead with a heavily-contested 3-pointer from senior forward Nate Navigato. Marshall had the ball as time wound down and Elmore missed a 3-point attempt in which contact was made in the act of shooting. No foul was called. Had Elmore been fouled, he would have had to make one of his three free-throws to seemingly secure a Marshall victory. Instead, the game went to overtime.

In overtime, Marshall’s offense was somewhat stagnant, once again. Nevertheless, the Herd had a one-point lead with 12 seconds remaining. Toledo responded with a floater from sophomore guard Marreon Jackson that hit off the back of the rim and eventually found the net.

Jackson’s shot proved to be the game-winner and Marshall turned the ball over on the ensuing inbound pass as time expired to give the Rockets the 75-74 advantage.

D’Antoni said he attributed the loss primarily to his team’s slow start. He said he liked a lot of what he saw from his team but it didn’t play with intensity.

“I don’t know how to describe what it was,” D’Antoni said. “The intensity wasn’t there. We looked unsure of ourselves and we were doing things that I haven’t seen them do in practice.”

Marshall’s will attempt to rebound Monday when Herd plays host to Morehead State in Huntington. Tipoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. in the Cam Henderson Center.

Derek Gilbert can be contacted at gilbert75@marshall.edu.

***

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Cabaret Response

I was a senior at a very liberal high school in a very conservative state when I was cast in Cabaret the day after the 2016 presidential election. As a young Jewish woman, I was afraid. I was afraid of hate, of bigotry, of harm, of being unsafe in my home. Antisemitism was raging through the Trump campaign and so it was only appropriate that our interpretation of Cabaret explored the play’s central theme of what it meant to be Jewish at the rise of one of the world’s largest waves of antisemitism. It was imperative that we told a story with incomparable weight- a story where the Jewish narrative was significant, a story where the hate is harmful and scary, a story where ignorance is dangerous.

I left Second Stage’s production of Cabaret this past Saturday trembling so hard I couldn’t stand and gripping the hand of my friend, also a Jewish thespian, whose eyes were red and soaked with tears. Somehow, this production of Cabaret, a story that had taught me how important theater could be to the safety and awareness of society, made me feel like I had been erased. It made it feel like my narrative, the Jewish narrative, was an afterthought to a Holocaust story-like, the slaughter of six million of my people was not worth discussing.

My fear began when I learned that the show was being dedicated “to all the Sallys of the world.” To me, the role of Sally is the epitome of ignorance and apathy towards society. She is the perfect example of turning a blind eye towards hate and harm. In a show dedicated to Sally, I saw a show dedicated to people who ignore antisemitism and hate simply because it doesn’t directly affect them, allowing it to grow stronger. And in a time where synagogues are becoming locations of mass shootings and anywhere can be the site of antisemitic vandalism and Nazi salutes find their ways into high school homecoming photos, I find myself feeling scared, anxious, on-edge, and alone. It is in this time more than ever that we cannot allow ourselves to become Sallys. We cannot allow ourselves to buy into ignorance because it is easy. We have to care.

Cabaret should be dedicated to Herr Schultz and the Jewish people. The Holocaust was fueled by antisemitism and a passionate hatred for Jews. Herr Schultz’s experience is central to the power of Cabaret and his struggles are imperative to our understanding of antisemitism today. I was heartbroken by the way his story, and therefore, the Jewish story, was shown as an afterthought. I was heartbroken by the prominent ambivalence with which his struggles were treated. I was heartbroken by how forgotten I felt-by how erased I felt.

I cannot say enough times how important Judaism is to this story. I understand the importance of telling stories that address racism, homophobia, transphobia, sexism, and other forms of violence against marginalized groups. However, choosing a different play or musical to tell these stories would have been more beneficial and respectful to all parties than displacing the power and significance of the Jewish story of Cabaret.

Even the pieces of the show that have a bit of extra room for interpretation- like the Emcee’s ending- center around the Jewish narrative. However, I was shocked to see the reveal of his pink triangle- the symbol used to mark LGBT victims. While there were far too many LGBT lives lost during the Holocaust, as well as lives of Romani, people of color, and other European minorities, Cabaret is not a story of those victims. Cabaret is a Jewish story. And therefore, the lack of a yellow star- the icon of Jewish victims- felt like ignorance. Shifting the Emcee’s narrative to focus on an LGBT victim brought another story that was also not properly addressed. Additionally, my understanding is that most audience members did not immediately recognized the pink triangle, however, they would have been more likely to recognize a yellow star. In this interpretation, I could not grasp what story was being told but I knew it was not the Jewish story. And that felt like erasure.

Although the rise of antisemitism in the last couple weeks has been terrifying, I walked out of WestCo Cafe more scared for my life as a Jewish woman than I have otherwise been because it made antisemitism feel acceptable. It made antisemitism feel commonplace. Here, at Wesleyan, especially in the theater community, we are constantly standing up for those persecuted for their race, gender, and sexuality. We discuss those topics in our casting, in our artistic intents, and in our final products. And despite what conversations do or don’t happen throughout our rehearsal process, each production is ultimately responsible for telling a story to the audience-for presenting a message to the audience.

I am scared because I couldn’t tell if it mattered to anyone but my friend and I that this was the story of a country about to kill six million people across Europe because they were just like us. I couldn’t tell if it bothered them that events in the script are written to show how Jews were treated like full-bodied animals (as in “If You Could See Her Through My Eyes,” a song in which the Jew is supposed to be wearing a full gorilla costume to show this animalization). I couldn’t tell if it phased anyone that a brick being thrown through a window is the mark of Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Glass, which was a massive, antisemitic riot at the beginning of the Holocaust. I couldn’t tell if it mattered to a soul that there is so much weight in every single line and every single song on that stage. Cabaret should never feel comfortable. The story should never be easy to watch. Yet somehow, I felt that my friend and I were the only ones uncomfortable in the space-and uncomfortable for the wrong reasons.

Every time I see this show or listen to the music, there is a line that shakes me to my core. It is at the very end of the show as Cliff is leaving Berlin. He is writing and he reads his work aloud. It says: “There was a Cabaret and there was a Master-of-Ceremonies and there was a city called Berlin in a country called Germany and it was the end of the world. And I was dancing with Sally Bowles. And we were both fast asleep.” This line sends chills down my spine because Sally and Cliff are just that- they are both fast asleep. They ignore the hate and violence and harm committed to those they know and those they don’t and, as if they were sleeping, they do not give it any extra attention.

The Holocaust is what happens when we do not give hate extra attention. Harm is what happens when we are fast asleep. Pain is what we endure when those around us are too deep in sleep to acknowledge that we are struggling to keep afloat.

Scott Miller, in his article “Inside Cabaret, an Analysis,” says: “One of the show’s central messages is ‘it could happen here.’ In the original production, there was a giant mirror on stage facing the audience. The implication was that the [Germans] who allowed Nazis to take power, were like us, ordinary people who found their country in trouble and looked for someone to fix things, to offer easy solutions.” And in the Nazi regime, an “easy out” was that erasure. We cannot allow that to be our escape today.

Today and everyday that Cabaret is produced, it needs to be a wake up call. It cannot laud those who sleep through atrocity. It must be handled with care and gravity and passion and a dedication to sharing an important message with the audience. It must be educated and educating. It must be focused on understanding what lead to the Holocaust and how that affected the people of the time and how it still continues to affect people every single day.

When it comes to Cabaret, when it comes to antisemitism, I am fully awake. I am always awake. And I will continue to be awake as long as I am not safe in my Jewish identity.

But today, on this campus, after seeing this show affect its audience-this community, I feel that everyone else is asleep. And they are all perfectly fine with it.

The show is over. It doesn’t make sense for me to give solutions or suggestions of things that could have been done differently by all parties. But it is not too late to wake up.

My charge to everyone who received the message of Second Stage’s Cabaret is to wake up. Go through the script or listen to the soundtrack and try to understand the weight of what is being presented to the audience. Try to understand these stories as life-or-death circumstances. And if you cannot understand alone, do some research. Learn about the Holocaust. Read testimonies from survivors. Look at pictures of camps and victims. Read statistics. Learn about antisemitism today. Read the news and find the articles about vandalism and violence in 2018. Find pieces that explain the offensive terms that are becoming a part of our daily rhetoric. Dissect the words of hate that are covering our news feeds. Talk to your Jewish friends about what this means for them.

Talk to me. I will dissect these stories with you and tell you my own. I will be your dramaturg. I believe this show is one of the most powerful pieces of art created in recent history-it is certainly the most significant art I have ever had the privilege of working on.

Every day that we sleep through this story, we get closer and closer to sleeping through this reality. Please, take the time-make the effort-put in the work to wake up. It is so incredibly important that we do.

-Lauren Stock

Respectfully signed: – Shana Laski – Matt Grimaldi – Betsy Zaubler – Lisa Stein – Sophie Elwood

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Cabaret Response

I was a senior at a very liberal high school in a very conservative state when I was cast in Cabaret the day after the 2016 presidential election. As a young Jewish woman, I was afraid. I was afraid of hate, of bigotry, of harm, of being unsafe in my home. Antisemitism was raging through the Trump campaign and so it was only appropriate that our interpretation of Cabaret explored the play’s central theme of what it meant to be Jewish at the rise of one of the world’s largest waves of antisemitism. It was imperative that we told a story with incomparable weight- a story where the Jewish narrative was significant, a story where the hate is harmful and scary, a story where ignorance is dangerous.

I left Second Stage’s production of Cabaret this past Saturday trembling so hard I couldn’t stand and gripping the hand of my friend, also a Jewish thespian, whose eyes were red and soaked with tears. Somehow, this production of Cabaret, a story that had taught me how important theater could be to the safety and awareness of society, made me feel like I had been erased. It made it feel like my narrative, the Jewish narrative, was an afterthought to a Holocaust story-like, the slaughter of six million of my people was not worth discussing.

My fear began when I learned that the show was being dedicated “to all the Sallys of the world.” To me, the role of Sally is the epitome of ignorance and apathy towards society. She is the perfect example of turning a blind eye towards hate and harm. In a show dedicated to Sally, I saw a show dedicated to people who ignore antisemitism and hate simply because it doesn’t directly affect them, allowing it to grow stronger. And in a time where synagogues are becoming locations of mass shootings and anywhere can be the site of antisemitic vandalism and Nazi salutes find their ways into high school homecoming photos, I find myself feeling scared, anxious, on-edge, and alone. It is in this time more than ever that we cannot allow ourselves to become Sallys. We cannot allow ourselves to buy into ignorance because it is easy. We have to care.

Cabaret should be dedicated to Herr Schultz and the Jewish people. The Holocaust was fueled by antisemitism and a passionate hatred for Jews. Herr Schultz’s experience is central to the power of Cabaret and his struggles are imperative to our understanding of antisemitism today. I was heartbroken by the way his story, and therefore, the Jewish story, was shown as an afterthought. I was heartbroken by the prominent ambivalence with which his struggles were treated. I was heartbroken by how forgotten I felt-by how erased I felt.

I cannot say enough times how important Judaism is to this story. I understand the importance of telling stories that address racism, homophobia, transphobia, sexism, and other forms of violence against marginalized groups. However, choosing a different play or musical to tell these stories would have been more beneficial and respectful to all parties than displacing the power and significance of the Jewish story of Cabaret.

Even the pieces of the show that have a bit of extra room for interpretation- like the Emcee’s ending- center around the Jewish narrative. However, I was shocked to see the reveal of his pink triangle- the symbol used to mark LGBT victims. While there were far too many LGBT lives lost during the Holocaust, as well as lives of Romani, people of color, and other European minorities, Cabaret is not a story of those victims. Cabaret is a Jewish story. And therefore, the lack of a yellow star- the icon of Jewish victims- felt like ignorance. Shifting the Emcee’s narrative to focus on an LGBT victim brought another story that was also not properly addressed. Additionally, my understanding is that most audience members did not immediately recognized the pink triangle, however, they would have been more likely to recognize a yellow star. In this interpretation, I could not grasp what story was being told but I knew it was not the Jewish story. And that felt like erasure.

Although the rise of antisemitism in the last couple weeks has been terrifying, I walked out of WestCo Cafe more scared for my life as a Jewish woman than I have otherwise been because it made antisemitism feel acceptable. It made antisemitism feel commonplace. Here, at Wesleyan, especially in the theater community, we are constantly standing up for those persecuted for their race, gender, and sexuality. We discuss those topics in our casting, in our artistic intents, and in our final products. And despite what conversations do or don’t happen throughout our rehearsal process, each production is ultimately responsible for telling a story to the audience-for presenting a message to the audience.

I am scared because I couldn’t tell if it mattered to anyone but my friend and I that this was the story of a country about to kill six million people across Europe because they were just like us. I couldn’t tell if it bothered them that events in the script are written to show how Jews were treated like full-bodied animals (as in “If You Could See Her Through My Eyes,” a song in which the Jew is supposed to be wearing a full gorilla costume to show this animalization). I couldn’t tell if it phased anyone that a brick being thrown through a window is the mark of Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Glass, which was a massive, antisemitic riot at the beginning of the Holocaust. I couldn’t tell if it mattered to a soul that there is so much weight in every single line and every single song on that stage. Cabaret should never feel comfortable. The story should never be easy to watch. Yet somehow, I felt that my friend and I were the only ones uncomfortable in the space-and uncomfortable for the wrong reasons.

Every time I see this show or listen to the music, there is a line that shakes me to my core. It is at the very end of the show as Cliff is leaving Berlin. He is writing and he reads his work aloud. It says: “There was a Cabaret and there was a Master-of-Ceremonies and there was a city called Berlin in a country called Germany and it was the end of the world. And I was dancing with Sally Bowles. And we were both fast asleep.” This line sends chills down my spine because Sally and Cliff are just that- they are both fast asleep. They ignore the hate and violence and harm committed to those they know and those they don’t and, as if they were sleeping, they do not give it any extra attention.

The Holocaust is what happens when we do not give hate extra attention. Harm is what happens when we are fast asleep. Pain is what we endure when those around us are too deep in sleep to acknowledge that we are struggling to keep afloat.

Scott Miller, in his article “Inside Cabaret, an Analysis,” says: “One of the show’s central messages is ‘it could happen here.’ In the original production, there was a giant mirror on stage facing the audience. The implication was that the [Germans] who allowed Nazis to take power, were like us, ordinary people who found their country in trouble and looked for someone to fix things, to offer easy solutions.” And in the Nazi regime, an “easy out” was that erasure. We cannot allow that to be our escape today.

Today and everyday that Cabaret is produced, it needs to be a wake up call. It cannot laud those who sleep through atrocity. It must be handled with care and gravity and passion and a dedication to sharing an important message with the audience. It must be educated and educating. It must be focused on understanding what lead to the Holocaust and how that affected the people of the time and how it still continues to affect people every single day.

When it comes to Cabaret, when it comes to antisemitism, I am fully awake. I am always awake. And I will continue to be awake as long as I am not safe in my Jewish identity.

But today, on this campus, after seeing this show affect its audience-this community, I feel that everyone else is asleep. And they are all perfectly fine with it.

The show is over. It doesn’t make sense for me to give solutions or suggestions of things that could have been done differently by all parties. But it is not too late to wake up.

My charge to everyone who received the message of Second Stage’s Cabaret is to wake up. Go through the script or listen to the soundtrack and try to understand the weight of what is being presented to the audience. Try to understand these stories as life-or-death circumstances. And if you cannot understand alone, do some research. Learn about the Holocaust. Read testimonies from survivors. Look at pictures of camps and victims. Read statistics. Learn about antisemitism today. Read the news and find the articles about vandalism and violence in 2018. Find pieces that explain the offensive terms that are becoming a part of our daily rhetoric. Dissect the words of hate that are covering our news feeds. Talk to your Jewish friends about what this means for them.

Talk to me. I will dissect these stories with you and tell you my own. I will be your dramaturg. I believe this show is one of the most powerful pieces of art created in recent history-it is certainly the most significant art I have ever had the privilege of working on.

Every day that we sleep through this story, we get closer and closer to sleeping through this reality. Please, take the time-make the effort-put in the work to wake up. It is so incredibly important that we do.

-Lauren Stock

Respectfully signed: – Shana Laski – Matt Grimaldi – Betsy Zaubler – Lisa Stein – Sophie Elwood

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘Undocumented and unafraid’ – The story of Lizbeth Mateo

Like many across the country, Lizbeth Mateo immigrated with her parents to the United States illegally, worked through numerous struggles to acclimate, learned English as a teenager and worked her way through college.

Unlike many, she earned her law degree and was appointed this year to a statewide committee.

Mateo sat down with the UT to tell her tale.

Lizbeth Mateo’s petite stature belies her internal strength. Mateo, the oldest of three children, was born and raised in Oaxaca, Mexico, one of the most poorest states in the country where few women study past sixth grade and even fewer attend college.

But Mateo’s parents pushed her to believe she could do anything in life. She believed it. She dreamed of being a doctor or lawyer.

When she was 12, she participated in a writing contest. The judges lavished her with praise on her prose. Full of pride, she rushed home to tell her family.

She shared the news and declared that she wanted to go to college someday.

As she saw tears swell in his eyes, Mateo was bewildered. “Why is he crying?” she recalled thinking.

As she stood there comforting him, it dawned on her: “He’s crying because he can’t afford college.”

She decided to keep quiet about her dreams for a while. She needed to think. She had to figure something out.

But not long after, her dad started talking about the idea of joining some of his relatives in California.

“I’m going to go work and send money so you can go to college,” he told her.

The family didn’t want him to leave. We should stay together, Mateo thought.

“Why don’t we all go for a couple of years and come back so I can continue studying?” she suggested, fully intending to return.

At 14, she was in high school and spoke no more than a few words of English. Her parents worked from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. most days.

Many times, she wondered if it had been selfish. They were exhausted. She was overwhelmed. She felt like giving up so many times.

In one such moment, she found herself reduced to tears as her doubts took over.

“Why am I doing this? I’m not even going to be able to use my degree. It’s going to be a worthless piece of paper,” she recalled thinking.

Her mom brought her a plate of food, as she often did, and offered this simple advice: “Eat. Don’t stress.”

In the back of her mind, she knew succeeding would allow her to help her parents someday.

“It was really important for me to go keep going so that someday I can provide my parents with a peaceful retirement so that they don’t have to work for their rest of their life long hours, six to seven days a week. I want them to enjoy everything my grandparents didn’t enjoy because of always working,” Mateo said.

It took six years, but Mateo graduated college and even went on to receive a law degree from Santa Clara University in 2016.

Despite being undocumented, she now has her own law practice in Wilmington.

She said her goal to not only provide quality legal services at a reasonable cost for the community, but to use her office as a safe space, a place where she can empower people to understand their rights.

Mateo said she is so thankful for all that she has been able to accomplish. Being appointed to the California Student Opportunity and Access Program Project Grant Advisory Committee — which looks for ways to help students from underserved communities go to college — was the cherry on top: “It was a beautiful surprise.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘Undocumented and unafraid’ – The story of Lizbeth Mateo

Like many across the country, Lizbeth Mateo immigrated with her parents to the United States illegally, worked through numerous struggles to acclimate, learned English as a teenager and worked her way through college.

Unlike many, she earned her law degree and was appointed this year to a statewide committee.

Mateo sat down with the UT to tell her tale.

Lizbeth Mateo’s petite stature belies her internal strength. Mateo, the oldest of three children, was born and raised in Oaxaca, Mexico, one of the most poorest states in the country where few women study past sixth grade and even fewer attend college.

But Mateo’s parents pushed her to believe she could do anything in life. She believed it. She dreamed of being a doctor or lawyer.

When she was 12, she participated in a writing contest. The judges lavished her with praise on her prose. Full of pride, she rushed home to tell her family.

She shared the news and declared that she wanted to go to college someday.

As she saw tears swell in his eyes, Mateo was bewildered. “Why is he crying?” she recalled thinking.

As she stood there comforting him, it dawned on her: “He’s crying because he can’t afford college.”

She decided to keep quiet about her dreams for a while. She needed to think. She had to figure something out.

But not long after, her dad started talking about the idea of joining some of his relatives in California.

“I’m going to go work and send money so you can go to college,” he told her.

The family didn’t want him to leave. We should stay together, Mateo thought.

“Why don’t we all go for a couple of years and come back so I can continue studying?” she suggested, fully intending to return.

At 14, she was in high school and spoke no more than a few words of English. Her parents worked from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. most days.

Many times, she wondered if it had been selfish. They were exhausted. She was overwhelmed. She felt like giving up so many times.

In one such moment, she found herself reduced to tears as her doubts took over.

“Why am I doing this? I’m not even going to be able to use my degree. It’s going to be a worthless piece of paper,” she recalled thinking.

Her mom brought her a plate of food, as she often did, and offered this simple advice: “Eat. Don’t stress.”

In the back of her mind, she knew succeeding would allow her to help her parents someday.

“It was really important for me to go keep going so that someday I can provide my parents with a peaceful retirement so that they don’t have to work for their rest of their life long hours, six to seven days a week. I want them to enjoy everything my grandparents didn’t enjoy because of always working,” Mateo said.

It took six years, but Mateo graduated college and even went on to receive a law degree from Santa Clara University in 2016.

Despite being undocumented, she now has her own law practice in Wilmington.

She said her goal to not only provide quality legal services at a reasonable cost for the community, but to use her office as a safe space, a place where she can empower people to understand their rights.

Mateo said she is so thankful for all that she has been able to accomplish. Being appointed to the California Student Opportunity and Access Program Project Grant Advisory Committee — which looks for ways to help students from underserved communities go to college — was the cherry on top: “It was a beautiful surprise.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘Undocumented and unafraid’ – The story of Lizbeth Mateo

Like many across the country, Lizbeth Mateo immigrated with her parents to the United States illegally, worked through numerous struggles to acclimate, learned English as a teenager and worked her way through college.

Unlike many, she earned her law degree and was appointed this year to a statewide committee.

Mateo sat down with the UT to tell her tale.

Lizbeth Mateo’s petite stature belies her internal strength. Mateo, the oldest of three children, was born and raised in Oaxaca, Mexico, one of the most poorest states in the country where few women study past sixth grade and even fewer attend college.

But Mateo’s parents pushed her to believe she could do anything in life. She believed it. She dreamed of being a doctor or lawyer.

When she was 12, she participated in a writing contest. The judges lavished her with praise on her prose. Full of pride, she rushed home to tell her family.

She shared the news and declared that she wanted to go to college someday.

As she saw tears swell in his eyes, Mateo was bewildered. “Why is he crying?” she recalled thinking.

As she stood there comforting him, it dawned on her: “He’s crying because he can’t afford college.”

She decided to keep quiet about her dreams for a while. She needed to think. She had to figure something out.

But not long after, her dad started talking about the idea of joining some of his relatives in California.

“I’m going to go work and send money so you can go to college,” he told her.

The family didn’t want him to leave. We should stay together, Mateo thought.

“Why don’t we all go for a couple of years and come back so I can continue studying?” she suggested, fully intending to return.

At 14, she was in high school and spoke no more than a few words of English. Her parents worked from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. most days.

Many times, she wondered if it had been selfish. They were exhausted. She was overwhelmed. She felt like giving up so many times.

In one such moment, she found herself reduced to tears as her doubts took over.

“Why am I doing this? I’m not even going to be able to use my degree. It’s going to be a worthless piece of paper,” she recalled thinking.

Her mom brought her a plate of food, as she often did, and offered this simple advice: “Eat. Don’t stress.”

In the back of her mind, she knew succeeding would allow her to help her parents someday.

“It was really important for me to go keep going so that someday I can provide my parents with a peaceful retirement so that they don’t have to work for their rest of their life long hours, six to seven days a week. I want them to enjoy everything my grandparents didn’t enjoy because of always working,” Mateo said.

It took six years, but Mateo graduated college and even went on to receive a law degree from Santa Clara University in 2016.

Despite being undocumented, she now has her own law practice in Wilmington.

She said her goal to not only provide quality legal services at a reasonable cost for the community, but to use her office as a safe space, a place where she can empower people to understand their rights.

Mateo said she is so thankful for all that she has been able to accomplish. Being appointed to the California Student Opportunity and Access Program Project Grant Advisory Committee — which looks for ways to help students from underserved communities go to college — was the cherry on top: “It was a beautiful surprise.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Inside the Waterparks “Entertainment Tour”

Waterparks & Company visit Ace of Spades  

Enthusiastic cheers echoed the hall, hands were held high and a real sense of community could be felt in the air at Ace of Spades on Sunday, Nov. 25th. This was one of the final shows of Waterparks’ “Entertainment Tour,” which featured performers such as De’Wayne Jackson feat. Dominic Stepanian, Nick Gray, I Don’t Know How But They Found Me, Super Whatevr and, of course, Waterparks.

From Nov. 2 to Dec. 1, the “Entertainment Tour” rocked its way through 22 states, met thousands of dedicated fans and performed many nights in the spotlight. From Florida all the way to California, the performers stayed busy in their one-month timeline.

The line-up of these performers — being an amalgam of genres that span from hip-hop, rap, pop, punk, new wave to indie — put on a phenomenal show and found a way to make each performance unique as well as engaging. From start to finish, the concert was loud and live; it was a rollercoaster ride through a genre wonderland. Some performers vibing to deep 808 basslines and others bringing the audience into a head banging rock show, which kept the night electric and the music alive.

All of the performers on the “Entertainment Tour” had been travelling together as an entourage, but catch their sets apart from the rest of the touring musicians and one would be perplexed as to how these differing genres work so well together on a tour.

Waterparks, hailing from Houston, Tex. is a next-gen pop-punk trio that can quickly get any crowd on their feet, as they did at Ace of Spades. Watching and listening from afar, they play as if they were a direct product of Blink-182 and Fall Out Boy in the early 2000’s — a memento from that one emo phase everyone considered going through. When they came on stage, the crowd went wild. It was a punk show but a safe space — everyone rocked out while loving and hugging each other between songs.

Superwhatvr, is an indie-band out of Orange County, Calif. According to its website, its songs “don’t seek to push away the darkness. Instead, they invite it in.” They are gritty, ultra-indie and have hints of gothic inspiration by way of their lyrics. It’s hard to tell whether they were listening to Grizzly Bear or Joy Division when they found their original inspiration, but their music could probably satisfy both styles. The lights went low and red when they came on stage, and the reverb/chorus/delay mix on their guitar and vocals brought the crowd into a moody realm, sometimes hanging their heads and sometimes doing the goth hop.

I Don’t Know How But They Found Me, often shortened to IDKHow, comes from Salt Lake City, Utah and is a band that considers themselves “out of time [and] one who faded away into obscurity” according to their website. With strong influences from the 1980’s new wave culture, their two-man band plays musical chairs between dumsets, guitars, microphones and keyboards. If a 80’s new wave fan were in the audience, they would have wondered whether they were watching an IDKHow show or a Depeche Mode reunion. Their music has a sense of longing and self-reflection, and against their electro-bass musical backdrop, the crowd danced like it was ‘88 and they were all wearing sunglass (at night).

Nick Gray, a rapper from Boston, Mass., sounds much like a perpetually autotuned Mac Miller. With his mic out of the stand and his crew dancing on-stage, Gray’s performance focused heavily on the choruses of his songs, which were always catchy enough to have the bulk of the crowd singing it for him. The 808’s slapped hard and, beyond the crowds control, they vibed to it.

De’Wayne Jackson, from Spring, Tex. and his featured guitarist, Dominic Stepanian of Grass Valley, CA are a duo that performed a blend of alt-rock, soulful R&B with a touch of hardcore-rap. One moment Jackson could be hitting a trap-worthy freestyle and the next he could be serenading the audience with angelic vocals against some bluesy guitar, or he might just hit go on a fast-paced, rap-punk song and start a mosh pit. The vivaciousness that Jackson puts into the spotlight is something similar to that of a modern-day Freddie Mercury, and Stepanian, with his ‘77 Gibson Les Paul in-hand, would surely leave Joe Bonamassa enthralled as he shredded a number of solos and made it look easy.

After the show, Stepanian took some time to answer questions about the tour, the performance and his experience being featured as De’Wayne Jackson’s guitarist on the tour.

“It’s so special to be on tour with such an amazing friends,” Stepanian said. “Especially getting to create and play music every night. Everyone we’ve travelled with puts on an amazing performance, especially De’Wayne, so my ultimate goal is to add any subtle nuances to his already unique sound, while also ensuring that I bring a bluesy, funky style that I love so much to table.”

Sacramento stood out from the rest of the shows on the tour.

“Although it is somewhat biased for me, since I’m from the Sacramento area, this was by far the best show on the tour,” Stepanian said. “Not only was I able to look out from the stage and see a wave of familiar faces, but the energy from everyone was electric that night. We had just left the Midwest and I believe everyone was already in high spirits to be in sunny California, but after the show, every performer had commented on how my ‘home-crowd’ was truly amazing.”

The tour was 23 shows in 28 days and flew by quickly.

“By the time we got to Sacramento, we all had grown very close on the tour,” Stepanian said. “So, when show time came, it was good vibes all around. Plus, since I was so close to home, it didn’t hurt to sleep in my own bed for a couple nights.”

The “Entertainment Tour,” focused heavily on blending a number of genres together to create a unique, one of a kind tour for its fans.

“I personally think that it is because of the trying times we live in why so many different art forms are being meshed together,” Stepanian continued. “Especially because music can be the means for ones’ self-expression and identification. Trying times calls for innovation [and] that is this tour. Something new and great for the world. I’m so happy to have been a part of this wonderful tour to help spread peace and positivity in a country that needs a lot more of it.”

Stepanian is not wrong. Change is essential, especially in music. This tour demonstrated the grand possibilities for music production and touring in the 21st century. The “Entertainment Tour” may have wound down, but the memories will live on for a lifetime. For the endless crowds of fans and the musicians alike.

Each artist from the “Entertainment Tour” can be found on Spotify, Soundcloud and their social media accounts.

Written by: Jarrett Rogers — arts@theaggie.org

The post Inside the Waterparks “Entertainment Tour” appeared first on The Aggie.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Inside the Waterparks “Entertainment Tour”

Waterparks & Company visit Ace of Spades  

Enthusiastic cheers echoed the hall, hands were held high and a real sense of community could be felt in the air at Ace of Spades on Sunday, Nov. 25th. This was one of the final shows of Waterparks’ “Entertainment Tour,” which featured performers such as De’Wayne Jackson feat. Dominic Stepanian, Nick Gray, I Don’t Know How But They Found Me, Super Whatevr and, of course, Waterparks.

From Nov. 2 to Dec. 1, the “Entertainment Tour” rocked its way through 22 states, met thousands of dedicated fans and performed many nights in the spotlight. From Florida all the way to California, the performers stayed busy in their one-month timeline.

The line-up of these performers — being an amalgam of genres that span from hip-hop, rap, pop, punk, new wave to indie — put on a phenomenal show and found a way to make each performance unique as well as engaging. From start to finish, the concert was loud and live; it was a rollercoaster ride through a genre wonderland. Some performers vibing to deep 808 basslines and others bringing the audience into a head banging rock show, which kept the night electric and the music alive.

All of the performers on the “Entertainment Tour” had been travelling together as an entourage, but catch their sets apart from the rest of the touring musicians and one would be perplexed as to how these differing genres work so well together on a tour.

Waterparks, hailing from Houston, Tex. is a next-gen pop-punk trio that can quickly get any crowd on their feet, as they did at Ace of Spades. Watching and listening from afar, they play as if they were a direct product of Blink-182 and Fall Out Boy in the early 2000’s — a memento from that one emo phase everyone considered going through. When they came on stage, the crowd went wild. It was a punk show but a safe space — everyone rocked out while loving and hugging each other between songs.

Superwhatvr, is an indie-band out of Orange County, Calif. According to its website, its songs “don’t seek to push away the darkness. Instead, they invite it in.” They are gritty, ultra-indie and have hints of gothic inspiration by way of their lyrics. It’s hard to tell whether they were listening to Grizzly Bear or Joy Division when they found their original inspiration, but their music could probably satisfy both styles. The lights went low and red when they came on stage, and the reverb/chorus/delay mix on their guitar and vocals brought the crowd into a moody realm, sometimes hanging their heads and sometimes doing the goth hop.

I Don’t Know How But They Found Me, often shortened to IDKHow, comes from Salt Lake City, Utah and is a band that considers themselves “out of time [and] one who faded away into obscurity” according to their website. With strong influences from the 1980’s new wave culture, their two-man band plays musical chairs between dumsets, guitars, microphones and keyboards. If a 80’s new wave fan were in the audience, they would have wondered whether they were watching an IDKHow show or a Depeche Mode reunion. Their music has a sense of longing and self-reflection, and against their electro-bass musical backdrop, the crowd danced like it was ‘88 and they were all wearing sunglass (at night).

Nick Gray, a rapper from Boston, Mass., sounds much like a perpetually autotuned Mac Miller. With his mic out of the stand and his crew dancing on-stage, Gray’s performance focused heavily on the choruses of his songs, which were always catchy enough to have the bulk of the crowd singing it for him. The 808’s slapped hard and, beyond the crowds control, they vibed to it.

De’Wayne Jackson, from Spring, Tex. and his featured guitarist, Dominic Stepanian of Grass Valley, CA are a duo that performed a blend of alt-rock, soulful R&B with a touch of hardcore-rap. One moment Jackson could be hitting a trap-worthy freestyle and the next he could be serenading the audience with angelic vocals against some bluesy guitar, or he might just hit go on a fast-paced, rap-punk song and start a mosh pit. The vivaciousness that Jackson puts into the spotlight is something similar to that of a modern-day Freddie Mercury, and Stepanian, with his ‘77 Gibson Les Paul in-hand, would surely leave Joe Bonamassa enthralled as he shredded a number of solos and made it look easy.

After the show, Stepanian took some time to answer questions about the tour, the performance and his experience being featured as De’Wayne Jackson’s guitarist on the tour.

“It’s so special to be on tour with such an amazing friends,” Stepanian said. “Especially getting to create and play music every night. Everyone we’ve travelled with puts on an amazing performance, especially De’Wayne, so my ultimate goal is to add any subtle nuances to his already unique sound, while also ensuring that I bring a bluesy, funky style that I love so much to table.”

Sacramento stood out from the rest of the shows on the tour.

“Although it is somewhat biased for me, since I’m from the Sacramento area, this was by far the best show on the tour,” Stepanian said. “Not only was I able to look out from the stage and see a wave of familiar faces, but the energy from everyone was electric that night. We had just left the Midwest and I believe everyone was already in high spirits to be in sunny California, but after the show, every performer had commented on how my ‘home-crowd’ was truly amazing.”

The tour was 23 shows in 28 days and flew by quickly.

“By the time we got to Sacramento, we all had grown very close on the tour,” Stepanian said. “So, when show time came, it was good vibes all around. Plus, since I was so close to home, it didn’t hurt to sleep in my own bed for a couple nights.”

The “Entertainment Tour,” focused heavily on blending a number of genres together to create a unique, one of a kind tour for its fans.

“I personally think that it is because of the trying times we live in why so many different art forms are being meshed together,” Stepanian continued. “Especially because music can be the means for ones’ self-expression and identification. Trying times calls for innovation [and] that is this tour. Something new and great for the world. I’m so happy to have been a part of this wonderful tour to help spread peace and positivity in a country that needs a lot more of it.”

Stepanian is not wrong. Change is essential, especially in music. This tour demonstrated the grand possibilities for music production and touring in the 21st century. The “Entertainment Tour” may have wound down, but the memories will live on for a lifetime. For the endless crowds of fans and the musicians alike.

Each artist from the “Entertainment Tour” can be found on Spotify, Soundcloud and their social media accounts.

Written by: Jarrett Rogers — arts@theaggie.org

The post Inside the Waterparks “Entertainment Tour” appeared first on The Aggie.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

No Diane, no problem for men’s basketball

The men’s basketball team beat San Marcos 76-72 on Wednesday and have now won back-to-back games for the first time this season.

Sophomore Terrell Gomez led the Matadors with a career-high 26 points, but it took a complete team effort to overcome the absence of standout redshirt freshman Lamine Diane, who missed the game with an injury sustained in the win over Pepperdine.

Fifth-year senior Blair Orr was especially productive, scoring a career-high 15 points and grabbing six rebounds while providing tremendous effort on both ends of the court.

“We ran our offense which is something in our first three games that we kind of struggled to do. Once we ran our offense, things just started to open up,” Orr said about what enabled him to have such a high impact on the game.

With Diane out, as well as junior Rodney Henderson Jr., freshmen Elijah Harkless and Teddy Ochieng, many Matadors had to play more minutes than they were used to and impressed under the circumstances.

Orr played a season-high 32 minutes, freshman Darius Brown II had nine points and seven assists in a career-high 37 minutes, while fellow freshman Jared Pearre posted career highs with eight points, three assists, and 26 minutes off the bench.

“Because we had so many guys out it was an opportunity for some other guys to play some more minutes, good minutes,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “I think that was good. A lot of guys got to play tonight and again we’re always happy to win.”

The Matadors started the game hot, hitting three of their first four 3-pointers before the Cougars went on a run to take a three-point lead midway through the first half. Junior Khalil Fuller was a menace in the paint for the Cougars, scoring a game-high 30 points to go along with 11 rebounds.

“I think it was more tough for me in spurts, getting fatigued and not staying with the principles that our coaches have implemented on defense,” Orr said. “You know, staying down and jumping for this and that. There was one or two times where he got under me and that’s something that the coaches preach not to let happen.”

The Matadors finished the first half strong, getting a key defensive stop as the clock ran out to take a 39-33 lead in to the break.

The second half featured plenty of back-and-forth action, though CSUN refused to back down and was able to hold on to win the game by four points.

It took every player’s contributions to pull out the win, with everyone scoring at least once, and the players pointed that out to each other after the game.

“That’s the first thing that anybody said in the locker room,” said Orr. “Terrell said, ‘hey. Yeah that was a tight one, yeah it came down to the wire but,’ just like you said, ‘it was a good opportunity for a lot of guys.’ And just going forward, now they get their feet wet, you know we just got to build from here.”

With the win, the Matadors sit at 3-5, though they have played better of late, winning three of their last five. They will head south for their next game against the University of San Diego on Sunday, Dec. 9 at 1 p.m. before coming home for a 3 p.m. game against the University of Pacific on Sunday, Dec. 16.

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UNC Hockey First in the West… Sort of

The University of Northern Colorado club hockey team is off to one of its best starts ever.

This year could be even better than last year, but there is still a little under half of the season to be played.

At this point in the season, the Bears are (16-1-2) or won 16 games, lost one and tied twice.

UNC is on track to win the Big Mountain Hockey Conference (BMHC) assuming there is no late season let down in the forecast.

In the BMHC a win counts as three points, a tie as one point and a loss is zero points.

Currently, UNC sits at 34 points overall with the closest rival, Metro State, at 24 points and Colorado State in third at 12 points.

Only 26 of UNC’s points are conference points so the conference race is still close despite nine conference wins. (26 points instead of 27 since the OT win over CSU counts as two points)

Being undefeated in conference will be a major goal for UNC as the season still has high profile non-conference games to be played.

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What’s Ahead for the Bears

UNC has several tough non-conference opponents left to play including: University of Mary, Texas A&M, Utah State, University of Washington and Central Oklahoma.

A loss still seems unlikely as the Bears have only lost once in 19 games played against impressive western region teams.

The lone team to beat UNC was the University of Mary by a score of 5-2.

Counter point to that is it was only game four on the regular season and the Bears have proven victorious in several ranked games and are defending their conference titles viciously.

University of Mary will visit UNC for two games in Greeley on January fourth and seventh to settle the best of three series.

Those two games will be extremely influential to the American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA) Western Region rankings as the only team above UNC is the University of Mary with a record of (24-2-2).

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Bears Number One in the West?

Fun fact, while University of Mary has every right to claim number one in the West and will on paper, according to ACHA rules first year teams are not eligible for postseason play.

University of Mary is on paper number one in the West, but taking into account playoff eligibility UNC is currently holding the position to be the first of the two automatic qualifier positions in the West.

Therefore, based on eligibility standings UNC is actually number one in the West.

Despite the superlatives, the season series will be decided for or against the Bears on Jan. 7.

Before that marquee matchup, UNC fans can rejoice as the Bears take on the Wyoming Cowboys in a home game (Friday) and away game (Saturday) as a tune up series heading into winter break.

Be sure to celebrate the end of finals week with a rowdy Bears hockey game Friday 8:30 p.m. at the Greeley Ice Haus.

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UNC Hockey First in the West… Sort of

The University of Northern Colorado club hockey team is off to one of its best starts ever.

This year could be even better than last year, but there is still a little under half of the season to be played.

At this point in the season, the Bears are (16-1-2) or won 16 games, lost one and tied twice.

UNC is on track to win the Big Mountain Hockey Conference (BMHC) assuming there is no late season let down in the forecast.

In the BMHC a win counts as three points, a tie as one point and a loss is zero points.

Currently, UNC sits at 34 points overall with the closest rival, Metro State, at 24 points and Colorado State in third at 12 points.

Only 26 of UNC’s points are conference points so the conference race is still close despite nine conference wins. (26 points instead of 27 since the OT win over CSU counts as two points)

Being undefeated in conference will be a major goal for UNC as the season still has high profile non-conference games to be played.

Image may contain: one or more people

What’s Ahead for the Bears

UNC has several tough non-conference opponents left to play including: University of Mary, Texas A&M, Utah State, University of Washington and Central Oklahoma.

A loss still seems unlikely as the Bears have only lost once in 19 games played against impressive western region teams.

The lone team to beat UNC was the University of Mary by a score of 5-2.

Counter point to that is it was only game four on the regular season and the Bears have proven victorious in several ranked games and are defending their conference titles viciously.

University of Mary will visit UNC for two games in Greeley on January fourth and seventh to settle the best of three series.

Those two games will be extremely influential to the American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA) Western Region rankings as the only team above UNC is the University of Mary with a record of (24-2-2).

Image may contain: one or more people and basketball court

Bears Number One in the West?

Fun fact, while University of Mary has every right to claim number one in the West and will on paper, according to ACHA rules first year teams are not eligible for postseason play.

University of Mary is on paper number one in the West, but taking into account playoff eligibility UNC is currently holding the position to be the first of the two automatic qualifier positions in the West.

Therefore, based on eligibility standings UNC is actually number one in the West.

Despite the superlatives, the season series will be decided for or against the Bears on Jan. 7.

Before that marquee matchup, UNC fans can rejoice as the Bears take on the Wyoming Cowboys in a home game (Friday) and away game (Saturday) as a tune up series heading into winter break.

Be sure to celebrate the end of finals week with a rowdy Bears hockey game Friday 8:30 p.m. at the Greeley Ice Haus.

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State Senator’s Religious Intolerance Places American Liberties at Risk

Oh, First Amendment, how I appreciate and defend you. Your flowery words read that Congress, “shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

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State Senator’s Religious Intolerance Places American Liberties at Risk

Oh, First Amendment, how I appreciate and defend you. Your flowery words read that Congress, “shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

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How Important Are Course Evaluations? 

Many students groan at the thought of completing a course evaluation. Personally, I questioned whether they would be worth my time and whether anyone would even read them. I decided to interview Dr. Brian Lenzmeier, BVU’s dean of faculty, to seek out some answers. If students knew how their feedback could lead to change, they might be motivated to complete their course evaluations. 

“The course evaluations (smartevals) have two purposes.  They are both developmental and evaluative,” Lenzmeier stated. “Faculty who are doing exceptional work with students, and students express that through the surveys, often receive recognition for this during their regular evaluations.  Faculty are also often nominated for awards based in part on positive student reviews.” 

What Lenzmeier is saying is that if a professor of mine is doing exceptional work, by recognizing that in my course evaluation, this gives said professor the potential to receive awards and recognition from the Dean of Faculty. One professor that I would recognize in my course evaluation is Dr. Merrin Guice, director of BVU’s choral ensemble.  She is one of the most active and engaged professors I have had the pleasure of working with this semester. Guice goes above and beyond when working with students at BVU, and she demonstrates a great passion in her field. She makes true attempts to connect with students and build a family-like bond as an ensemble. 

On the other hand, a professor who is viewed as inefficient by their students will receive extra training of sorts to improve. If the instructor does not improve, they will receive a negative evaluation from the dean of faculty. 

Lenzmeier also shared an example of a faculty member who benefitted from negative feedback on course evaluations. 

“One of our faculty members was not returning homework and exams in a timely manner and was not providing helpful comments on graded work, so students expressed frustrations about this through the survey,” Lenzmeier explained. “The dean reads those surveys and one of his teaching goals for the next semester became doing a better job of providing constructive feedback to students in a timely manner.  The instructor was paired up with another professor who had a reputation for providing timely and meaningful feedback.  The instructor who was struggling has now developed a reputation as someone who returns things quickly and gives good feedback.  The survey was evaluative in that if the instructor did not improve they would receive a negative evaluation, and it was developmental in that it helped the instructor identify something that was not going well and led to a plan to improve their teaching and service to students.”  

Lenzmeier further explained the evaluation process and the outcomes of those evaluations. 

“Several weeks after grades are submitted to the registrar, the faculty receive electronic copies of the evaluations,” said Lenzmeier. “The Deans read every course evaluation from their school every semester and use them as one of several criteria in the regular evaluation process of faculty.  Outcomes range from faculty receiving praise and awards for doing good work to faculty members being put on improvement plans.  Extreme cases that happen several times can potentially lead to BVU no longer employing that faculty member.”  

Student feedback of professors does matter. Positive reception can lead to special recognition for outstanding work; negative reception can lead to improvement plans. In extreme cases, course evaluations can also be a factor in determining continued employment of faculty members. Course evaluations are completely anonymous. They give students a chance to anonymously express their opinions—good or bad—in a formal way that can have real influence at BVU. Your voice matters.

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Parties and Immigration

Parties and Immigration

A thought entered my brain watching the so-called “caravan” arrive at the San Ysidro Port of Entry: “This looks like freshmen trying to hop the fence at an all-campus party.” Hear me out. My hope is not to demean the plight of immigrants or compare their struggles to those of bored Stanford students, but to illustrate why policy should target both rule of law and migration.

The left and right quibble if immigrants are fleeing violence or just poverty, but the distinction is a distraction. Is welcoming people who want to work really conservative, a key part of American exceptionalism, and an economic boon? Absolutely. When Ronald Reagan spoke of America as John Winthrop’s “shining city on a hill,” he was keen to add, “if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here.” Thomas Jefferson protested in the Declaration of Independence that King George halted immigration and naturalization. High-skill immigration obviously provides gains from innovation. Low-skill immigrants yield cheaper goods and services; free two-day Amazon delivery, a $10 Uber, and a $2.40 In-N-Out burger are possible because of immigrants.

These arguments do not justify open-borders but rather take secure borders as a prerequisite. Consider all-campus fraternity parties. Just as immigrants are important to a vibrant, growing nation, freshmen are critical to these drunken festivities. Since Stanford usually lacks enough upperclassmen looking to party on any given night, fraternities need freshmen to fill their parties. But, row houses do not leave their front doors wide open. For good reason, high schoolers and the belligerently drunk are not welcome. Criminals and terrorists pose an analogous threat to national order. A student who shows no interest in reading Enchanted Broccoli Forest’s consent rules is not entitled to attend EBF’s weekly parties; migrants who refuse to adhere to our laws are not entitled to cross our borders.

And as upperclassmen sometimes speak ill of freshmen, natives buy into fallacies about immigration. Critics bluster about job losses and wage declines. But immigrants also buy goods and services, increasing demand. Further, land and capital abound in the United States. Thus, the number of jobs is not fixed. Women entering the workforce did not cost men their jobs, black migration from the rural south to northern cities did not cause rampant white unemployment, and Texas does not try “saving jobs” by keeping out workers fleeing California’s high taxes and zoning restrictions. Closing the border even fails in the long run to subsidize low-skill paychecks since prohibiting migration incentivizes capital to move to other countries. Immigration restrictions backfire like any labor protection, be it the minimum wage, union shops, or occupational licensing. Here, both political parties are ideologically inconsistent.

Similar to a fraternity worrying freshmen are drinking all its beer, taxpayers voice reasonable concerns over unemployed immigrants bankrupting government coffers. But prohibiting working immigrants – who pay income, payroll, and sales taxes – is nonsensical. With a secure border, officials issuing work visas could simply require an immigrant to post an immigration bond, which is then forfeited if this worker is unemployed, commits a crime, or uses excessive social services. Companies which need employees could help immigrants pay this bond. Even if there is a net cost to welcoming certain economic migrants, a dubious assertion, we have two policy choices. Follow the Soviet model: quotas. Or, the time-tested American method: prices. Specify the terms on which people can come here and work, and let market forces determine number of work permits, such that migrants and natives are both better off.

Social arguments are also a contention. Will economic immigrants embrace American institutions? Those fleeing kangaroo courts, gang warfare, and socialism have first-hand experience to boost their appreciation for American economic and political exceptionalism. Look at Cuban-Americans who fled Castro and embraced Americana. To keep the analogy going, freshmen “caravaning” from Wilbur Hall to Kappa Sigma’s eurotrash-themed party want, just as much as upperclassmen, to bounce up and down to “Mo Bamba,” to shotgun Natty Light beer, and to hit some mango Juul. But in all seriousness, the “culture war” was not lost when entrepreneurial and hard-working immigrants docked at Ellis Island; it is not lost when migrants seeking a better life arrive at the South Texas border.

The analogy to a college party is imperfect, and not just because of a false moral equivalence. Fraternity houses do reach capacity, but America is far from filling up. A simple yet revealing statistic: The U.S. is home to 36 people per square kilometer, a long way from the United Kingdom’s 273 people per square kilometer. As for the national conversation, the immigration debate has taken on a xenophobic rancor on one side and naivete on the other. Next time these ineptitudes show up on television or Twitter, think of a college party. Then, remember economic migration is entirely compatible with the rule of law. Commentators in the 1970s noted “only Nixon could go to China,” because of his strong anti-communist stance. Hopefully President Donald Trump’s hard line on securing the border will allow him to build, in his words, “a big, fat, beautiful, open door” for legal immigrants.

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Smith suffers season-ending ankle injury

Story by Blake Sandlin

Sports Editor

bsandlin1@murraystate.edu

Senior forward Anthony Smith will miss the remainder of the men’s basketball season after suffering a non-contact ankle injury in practice, Head Coach Matt McMahon announced on Wednesday, Dec. 5.

Smith suffered the injury during Tuesday’s practice, and will have surgery on his ankle on Thursday, Dec. 6. McMahon said he recognized the magnitude of the injury immediately after it occurred.

“He’s one of, if not the toughest guys that I’ve had the opportunity to coach. He’s such a warrior, and he only knows one speed, and that’s full throttle. Rarely is he gonna be one to get injured or show any signs of being hurt, and once he went down you knew it wasn’t good. Like I said, it was non-contact. Didn’t step on anyone’s foot; wasn’t jumping. It was just kind of a fluke deal, really.”

Smith, who has started in all five of the Racers’ games this season, has done a lot with a little. While only averaging 18.2 minutes per game this year, Smith has averaged 7.6 ppg and 5 rpg. His 16 rebounds (3.2 per game) through five games is tied for 50th in the country.

Despite the loss, McMahon emphasized that his team’s focus won’t change.

“Nothing changes for us,” McMahon said. “We’re just going to keep working hard, work to get better and have fun playing. Obviously we’ll miss everything that Anthony brings to our team. He’s a team captain, a leader and just a relentless worker. He sets the tone everyday in our practices for how you come to work.”

McMahon is hopeful Smith’s injury so early in the season will allow him to claim a medical redshirt, granting him a full season of play next year.

“Obviously it’d be a slam dunk that he would get the medical hardship having only played five games,” McMahon said.

The Racers will likely lean on the services of freshman forward KJ Williams and junior forward Darnell Cowart, who have averaged 17.3 minutes per game combined to this point.

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Morgan State Defeats Binghamton University in Thriller

Morgan State (2-5) hosted the Binghamton Bearcats (3-5) on Wednesday night in the Hill Field House.

Coming into the game, Binghamton guard Sam Sessoms was named the rookie of the week for the second time this season. A win would give his team their first road win of the season.

In this non-conference matchup, Morgan drew first blood with a layup by Guard Sherwyn Devonish-Prince Jr. The game featured a lot of missed shots early on.

After getting sent to the free throw line, Sessoms yells to teammates “get ready to keep shooting, we’re getting a lot of open shots.”  This proved to be true when teammate J.C. Show began to heat up by making a three and a two on consecutive possessions.

Offensively, Morgan continued to find holes in the Bearcats zone defense. At this point in the game, the Bears held the lead by one.

Show and Sessoms were causing problems for the Bears defense the entire first half. Show leads the game with eight points after making a three from the corner. The Bearcats were hitting 60% from the field.

Morgan wasted their possessions with turnovers and missed shots. This enabled Binghamton to start pulling away.

Bearcats forward Caleb Stewart makes a three causing the lead to grow to 34-21.

The Bears tried to gain some momentum after forward Jordan Little made a two.

It quickly shifted when they sent Show to the free throw line who is already averaging 11 plus per game.

As time expired in the first half Binghamton guard Timmy Rose nailed a three-pointer making the lead 44-28 at halftime.

The Bears knew they had work to do in the second half, so they started fast with twos made by both Prince and Little. Morgan cut the lead down to 52-38 within minutes of starting this half.

Binghamton, who seemed to be complacent with their lead, continued to turn the ball over and foul. The Bearcats had a chance to run away with the game but allowed Morgan to stay alive.

Defensively, the Bears made a great halftime adjustment on Show and Sessoms. The two hadn’t made a single point in this second half.

With 7:55 left to go the lead was 56-54 as Morgan began to rally. The teams began to go back and forth. At this the point the lead was never larger than 4.

Sessoms, who seemed to be non-existent this half, knocked down back to back three-pointers making the score 68-66 Morgan. On the ensuing Bears possession, forward Victory Curry got fouled on a two-point play and gets sent to the free throw line. Curry, making both of his free throws made it a two-possession game with under 40 seconds left.

Sessoms tried to create some late game heroics but turned the ball over and this ultimately led to the win for Morgan State.

The final score was 74-68.

The leading scorers of the game from each side were Sam Sessoms with 22 points and Jordan Little with 14. This was a great bounce back victory for the Bears at home.

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Morgan State Defeats Binghamton University (74-68) in Thriller

Morgan State (2-5) wins 74-68 against the Binghamton Bearcats (3-5) Wednesday night in the Hill Field House.

Coming into the game, Binghamton guard Sam Sessoms was named the rookie of the week for the second time this season. A win would give his team their first road win of the season.

In this non-conference matchup, Morgan drew first blood with a layup by Guard Sherwyn Devonish-Prince Jr. The game featured a lot of missed shots early on.

After getting sent to the free throw line, Sessoms yells to teammates “get ready to keep shooting, we’re getting a lot of open shots.”  This proved to be true when teammate J.C. Show began to heat up by making a three and a two on consecutive possessions.

Offensively, Morgan continued to find holes in the Bearcats zone defense. At this point in the game, the Bears held the lead by one.

Show and Sessoms were causing problems for the Bears defense the entire first half. Show leads the game with eight points after making a three from the corner. The Bearcats were hitting 60% from the field.

Morgan wasted their possessions with turnovers and missed shots. This enabled Binghamton to start pulling away.

Bearcats forward Caleb Stewart makes a three causing the lead to grow to 34-21.

The Bears tried to gain some momentum after forward Jordan Little made a two.

It quickly shifted when they sent Show to the free throw line who is already averaging 11 plus per game.

As time expired in the first half Binghamton guard Timmy Rose nailed a three-pointer making the lead 44-28 at halftime.

The Bears knew they had work to do in the second half, so they started fast with twos made by both Prince and Little. Morgan cut the lead down to 52-38 within minutes of starting this half.

Binghamton, who seemed to be complacent with their lead, continued to turn the ball over and foul. The Bearcats had a chance to run away with the game but allowed Morgan to stay alive.

Defensively, the Bears made a great halftime adjustment on Show and Sessoms. The two hadn’t made a single point in this second half.

With 7:55 left to go the lead was 56-54 as Morgan began to rally. The teams began to go back and forth. At this the point, the lead was never larger than 4.

Sessoms, who seemed to be non-existent this half, knocked down back to back three-pointers making the score 68-66 Morgan. On the ensuing Bears possession, forward Victory Curry got fouled on a two-point play and gets sent to the free throw line. Curry, making both of his free throws made it a two-possession game with under 40 seconds left.

Sessoms tried to create some late-game heroics but turned the ball over and this ultimately led to the win for Morgan State.

The leading scorers of the game from each side were Sam Sessoms with 22 points and Jordan Little with 14. This was a great bounce back victory for the Bears at home.

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Too soon to tell

Humboldt State University looks to cut classes earlier for low enrollment

Clarissa Cardenas is a first year student double-majoring in French and international studies. Initially, she enrolled in the wrong French class and had to switch and enroll into a different class a couple days into her first semester. If that class had been cut due to enrollment she would’ve never had the opportunity to enroll late.

For spring semester Humboldt State University is attempting to cut classes earlier for low enrollment than previous semesters, putting situations like Cardenas’ in jeopardy. Before classes wouldn’t get cut until after winter break and up until the first day of the semester, sometimes longer.

“I get nervous because the French program is small and if they cut those classes before school even starts then students have to scramble looking for classes,” Cardenas said.

Vice provost of the dean for undergraduate and graduate studies Rock Braithwaite said cutting classes is routine and happens every semester. It occurs in the transitional stage between the end of one semester and the beginning of the next. Braithwaite said they’re trying to do a better job identifying and assessing class enrollment so they can address cutting classes sooner.

“I’m almost embarrassed to say it but cutting classes happens up to the first day of the semester,” Braithwaite said. “Students are contacted if and when substitutions are needed.”

Cardenas said that cutting classes early is taking away the opportunity for students to enroll in vital classes if they enroll late. She knows logistically the university has to cut classes, but said students get the short end of the stick.

“Students enroll late in classes all the time and to cut those classes is very one-sided,” Cadenas said. “We shouldn’t be punished for enrolling late and should be given the opportunity to search for classes.”

Junior film major Alfonso Trejos said cutting classes early can potentially affect students’ financial aid. Trejos said it’s a better outcome if the school cuts classes later so students are already enrolled and qualify for financial aid. If the class is cut due to low enrollment while he is already enrolled a professor can show open classes to take.

“School is expensive and it comes down to the money most of the time for people,” Trejos said.

Maria Sanchez is a junior in social work and plans on interning her last semester. Sanchez said she doesn’t want to overload herself while interning, so she’s taking more than the unit cap of classes. She has to petition for the extra units she enrolls in and that takes time.

“Sometimes I’m not even able to enroll in a class until the first day of the semester,” Sanchez said.

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Screen grab of social work course rotations.

The more time students have to search for classes without fear of having them cut, Sanchez said is best. She said it isn’t a huge deal to wait to cut classes like the school has been doing but for students cutting classes early is detrimental.

“In my department if you don’t get in or pass a class you have to wait an entire year to take it again,” Sanchez said.

 

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Man arrested on campus for warrant

A man discovered in the university’s parking lot late Wednesday afternoon has been arrested.

The Vanderburgh County Sheriff’s Office took Brian J. Myers, 46, into custody on an outstanding warrant from neighboring Gibson County. The arrest was made along University Blvd. shortly after 4:25 p.m., according to the VCSO.

Brian J. Myers, 46, was arrested for an outstanding warrant from Gibson County on Dec. 5 on USI’s campus.

Director of Public Safety Steve Bequette said his officers along with the USI VCSO Patrol Unit responded to the scene.

Authorities had been searching for Myers on charges of possession of marijuana before he was discovered in the parking lot in front of the Orr Center.

Myers was booked into the Vanderburgh County Jail at 6:13 p.m., Nov. 5 according to jail booking records. He is currently being held without bond as authorities await his extradition back to Gibson County.

University Boulevard was restricted to one lane for 20 minutes while deputies cleared the scene.

This story will be updated as more information becomes available.

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Assault, possible “anti-LGBTQ” incident reported near campus

By: Bailey Hendricks, Senior Editor and Karuga Koinange, Editor-in-Chief

Two men were assaulted and called a homophobic slur while walking along the 8000 block of York Road last week, according to Baltimore County Police.

The possible hate-bias incident occurred between 1 a.m. and 2 a.m. on Nov. 30 when the two men encountered a man who called the victims a homophobic slur and proceeded to physically assault them, police said in a report.

According to an article from the Baltimore Sun, Police Spokesman Shawn Vinson said the victims were arguing when the suspect told them to “kiss and make up.”

One of the victims went on to argue with the suspect, and Vinson said he called them a homophobic slur and punched one of them several times.

According to police, another man joined the altercation and then both suspects were seen walking into Cardiff Hall apartments.

Towson University spokesman Sean Welsh said that three of of the people involved were students.

Towson University President Kim Schatzel addressed the incident.

“It made me very sad, angry and disappointed,” Schatzel said. “I don’t think it’s reflective of the entire community at all and the community’s commitment to inclusion.”

Schatzel also sent an email to students and staff yesterday, addressing the incident. She explained that the Baltimore County Police report on the incident “included speech that was anti-LGBTQ in nature,” in the email.

The incident took place near Aigburth Road, where the assault and harassment of two members of the Jewish fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi occurred earlier this year.

The Towson University Police Department, Office of Student Conduct and Civility Education and the Office of Inclusion and Institutional Equity were notified of the incident and have begun a full investigation, according to the email.

“Violence of any kind is totally not acceptable not just on this campus, but in society,” Schatzel said. “The fact that it was related to an identity group also that the individuals were a part of further makes the situation serious… The folks involved were members of our community and our community is committed to the fact that we are inclusive.”

The Towerlight will provide updates as more information becomes available.

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‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy

Erica Haas/HIGHLANDER
Danish Maqbool is a stand-up comedian from New Jersey.

The South Asian Federation (SAF) in collaboration with Asian Pacific Student Programs hosted their first comedy show, “In Unity we Stand featuring Akaash Singh and Danish Maqbool” on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Around 160 students, families, and community members gathered at HUB 302N to relax and enjoy Maqbool and Singh’s comedy. Maqbool is a Pakistan-American stand-up comedian from New Jersey. Singh is an Indian-American stand-up comedian known for his roles in Netflix’s “Brown Nation,” and MTV’s “Wild N’ Out,” “Joking Off” and “Guy Code.”

The show started at 8:15 p.m. with the president of SAF, fourth-year bioengineering major Ashley Thomas, commenting on the importance of bringing Singh and Maqbool. Historically, Pakistan and India have had political and socioeconomic tension, yet Singh and Maqbool show that unity is possible. “(Singh and Maqbool) were able to step out of their countries and do a show together is a very powerful message to state,” stated Thomas. “That is why we wanted to bring these comedians here, to show the South Asian student population at UCR that that is something that’s possible.”

Danish Maqbool came on stage to start his comedy routine. Maqbool’s relaxed personality complimented his dry yet bold humor as he commented on Trump, prejudice within communities of color and his experience facing discrimination as a Pakistani-American. “It’s hard looking like me in this country, but we still have to make it work,” Maqbool said. Maqbool’s routine included making fun of the tension in the room from the issues he joked about.

Maqbool then introduced Singh and left the stage. Singh’s comedy routine was energetic and unapologetic as his jokes poked fun at relationships, dating and how people are too sensitive in this day and age. “I’m not afraid to joke about controversial things because if you can’t laugh about painful things, there’s no other way to cope,” Singh commented.

Afterwards, Maqbool joined Singh on stage, and they both answered questions from the audience. Both playfully teased the audience on their attire and majors throughout the Q&A section. Though the two of them did not directly comment on tensions between India and Pakistan, they shared their experience in the comedy realm.

“They’re two people with two different backgrounds, but ultimately they’re part of a society,” said Vishal Kumar Gupta, SAF’s Creative Director and fourth-year biology major. “They show us that we all face similar circumstances, and we’re not as different as we think.”

Many students in the audience expressed similar sentiments. “As someone who is Bengali (Bangladeshi), it was a funny show and it was cool to see an Indian and Pakistani collaborating because it’s not very common,” stated Alvee Ahmed, a second-year neuroscience major. “South Asian countries should have unification because we’re all minorities and have many things in common, so I hope to see more collaborations similar to theirs.”

The post ‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy appeared first on Highlander.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy

Erica Haas/HIGHLANDER
Danish Maqbool is a stand-up comedian from New Jersey.

The South Asian Federation (SAF) in collaboration with Asian Pacific Student Programs hosted their first comedy show, “In Unity we Stand featuring Akaash Singh and Danish Maqbool” on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Around 160 students, families, and community members gathered at HUB 302N to relax and enjoy Maqbool and Singh’s comedy. Maqbool is a Pakistan-American stand-up comedian from New Jersey. Singh is an Indian-American stand-up comedian known for his roles in Netflix’s “Brown Nation,” and MTV’s “Wild N’ Out,” “Joking Off” and “Guy Code.”

The show started at 8:15 p.m. with the president of SAF, fourth-year bioengineering major Ashley Thomas, commenting on the importance of bringing Singh and Maqbool. Historically, Pakistan and India have had political and socioeconomic tension, yet Singh and Maqbool show that unity is possible. “(Singh and Maqbool) were able to step out of their countries and do a show together is a very powerful message to state,” stated Thomas. “That is why we wanted to bring these comedians here, to show the South Asian student population at UCR that that is something that’s possible.”

Danish Maqbool came on stage to start his comedy routine. Maqbool’s relaxed personality complimented his dry yet bold humor as he commented on Trump, prejudice within communities of color and his experience facing discrimination as a Pakistani-American. “It’s hard looking like me in this country, but we still have to make it work,” Maqbool said. Maqbool’s routine included making fun of the tension in the room from the issues he joked about.

Maqbool then introduced Singh and left the stage. Singh’s comedy routine was energetic and unapologetic as his jokes poked fun at relationships, dating and how people are too sensitive in this day and age. “I’m not afraid to joke about controversial things because if you can’t laugh about painful things, there’s no other way to cope,” Singh commented.

Afterwards, Maqbool joined Singh on stage, and they both answered questions from the audience. Both playfully teased the audience on their attire and majors throughout the Q&A section. Though the two of them did not directly comment on tensions between India and Pakistan, they shared their experience in the comedy realm.

“They’re two people with two different backgrounds, but ultimately they’re part of a society,” said Vishal Kumar Gupta, SAF’s Creative Director and fourth-year biology major. “They show us that we all face similar circumstances, and we’re not as different as we think.”

Many students in the audience expressed similar sentiments. “As someone who is Bengali (Bangladeshi), it was a funny show and it was cool to see an Indian and Pakistani collaborating because it’s not very common,” stated Alvee Ahmed, a second-year neuroscience major. “South Asian countries should have unification because we’re all minorities and have many things in common, so I hope to see more collaborations similar to theirs.”

The post ‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy appeared first on Highlander.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy

Erica Haas/HIGHLANDER
Danish Maqbool is a stand-up comedian from New Jersey.

The South Asian Federation (SAF) in collaboration with Asian Pacific Student Programs hosted their first comedy show, “In Unity we Stand featuring Akaash Singh and Danish Maqbool” on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Around 160 students, families, and community members gathered at HUB 302N to relax and enjoy Maqbool and Singh’s comedy. Maqbool is a Pakistan-American stand-up comedian from New Jersey. Singh is an Indian-American stand-up comedian known for his roles in Netflix’s “Brown Nation,” and MTV’s “Wild N’ Out,” “Joking Off” and “Guy Code.”

The show started at 8:15 p.m. with the president of SAF, fourth-year bioengineering major Ashley Thomas, commenting on the importance of bringing Singh and Maqbool. Historically, Pakistan and India have had political and socioeconomic tension, yet Singh and Maqbool show that unity is possible. “(Singh and Maqbool) were able to step out of their countries and do a show together is a very powerful message to state,” stated Thomas. “That is why we wanted to bring these comedians here, to show the South Asian student population at UCR that that is something that’s possible.”

Danish Maqbool came on stage to start his comedy routine. Maqbool’s relaxed personality complimented his dry yet bold humor as he commented on Trump, prejudice within communities of color and his experience facing discrimination as a Pakistani-American. “It’s hard looking like me in this country, but we still have to make it work,” Maqbool said. Maqbool’s routine included making fun of the tension in the room from the issues he joked about.

Maqbool then introduced Singh and left the stage. Singh’s comedy routine was energetic and unapologetic as his jokes poked fun at relationships, dating and how people are too sensitive in this day and age. “I’m not afraid to joke about controversial things because if you can’t laugh about painful things, there’s no other way to cope,” Singh commented.

Afterwards, Maqbool joined Singh on stage, and they both answered questions from the audience. Both playfully teased the audience on their attire and majors throughout the Q&A section. Though the two of them did not directly comment on tensions between India and Pakistan, they shared their experience in the comedy realm.

“They’re two people with two different backgrounds, but ultimately they’re part of a society,” said Vishal Kumar Gupta, SAF’s Creative Director and fourth-year biology major. “They show us that we all face similar circumstances, and we’re not as different as we think.”

Many students in the audience expressed similar sentiments. “As someone who is Bengali (Bangladeshi), it was a funny show and it was cool to see an Indian and Pakistani collaborating because it’s not very common,” stated Alvee Ahmed, a second-year neuroscience major. “South Asian countries should have unification because we’re all minorities and have many things in common, so I hope to see more collaborations similar to theirs.”

The post ‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy appeared first on Highlander.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy

Erica Haas/HIGHLANDER
Danish Maqbool is a stand-up comedian from New Jersey.

The South Asian Federation (SAF) in collaboration with Asian Pacific Student Programs hosted their first comedy show, “In Unity we Stand featuring Akaash Singh and Danish Maqbool” on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Around 160 students, families, and community members gathered at HUB 302N to relax and enjoy Maqbool and Singh’s comedy. Maqbool is a Pakistan-American stand-up comedian from New Jersey. Singh is an Indian-American stand-up comedian known for his roles in Netflix’s “Brown Nation,” and MTV’s “Wild N’ Out,” “Joking Off” and “Guy Code.”

The show started at 8:15 p.m. with the president of SAF, fourth-year bioengineering major Ashley Thomas, commenting on the importance of bringing Singh and Maqbool. Historically, Pakistan and India have had political and socioeconomic tension, yet Singh and Maqbool show that unity is possible. “(Singh and Maqbool) were able to step out of their countries and do a show together is a very powerful message to state,” stated Thomas. “That is why we wanted to bring these comedians here, to show the South Asian student population at UCR that that is something that’s possible.”

Danish Maqbool came on stage to start his comedy routine. Maqbool’s relaxed personality complimented his dry yet bold humor as he commented on Trump, prejudice within communities of color and his experience facing discrimination as a Pakistani-American. “It’s hard looking like me in this country, but we still have to make it work,” Maqbool said. Maqbool’s routine included making fun of the tension in the room from the issues he joked about.

Maqbool then introduced Singh and left the stage. Singh’s comedy routine was energetic and unapologetic as his jokes poked fun at relationships, dating and how people are too sensitive in this day and age. “I’m not afraid to joke about controversial things because if you can’t laugh about painful things, there’s no other way to cope,” Singh commented.

Afterwards, Maqbool joined Singh on stage, and they both answered questions from the audience. Both playfully teased the audience on their attire and majors throughout the Q&A section. Though the two of them did not directly comment on tensions between India and Pakistan, they shared their experience in the comedy realm.

“They’re two people with two different backgrounds, but ultimately they’re part of a society,” said Vishal Kumar Gupta, SAF’s Creative Director and fourth-year biology major. “They show us that we all face similar circumstances, and we’re not as different as we think.”

Many students in the audience expressed similar sentiments. “As someone who is Bengali (Bangladeshi), it was a funny show and it was cool to see an Indian and Pakistani collaborating because it’s not very common,” stated Alvee Ahmed, a second-year neuroscience major. “South Asian countries should have unification because we’re all minorities and have many things in common, so I hope to see more collaborations similar to theirs.”

The post ‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy appeared first on Highlander.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy

Erica Haas/HIGHLANDER
Danish Maqbool is a stand-up comedian from New Jersey.

The South Asian Federation (SAF) in collaboration with Asian Pacific Student Programs hosted their first comedy show, “In Unity we Stand featuring Akaash Singh and Danish Maqbool” on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Around 160 students, families, and community members gathered at HUB 302N to relax and enjoy Maqbool and Singh’s comedy. Maqbool is a Pakistan-American stand-up comedian from New Jersey. Singh is an Indian-American stand-up comedian known for his roles in Netflix’s “Brown Nation,” and MTV’s “Wild N’ Out,” “Joking Off” and “Guy Code.”

The show started at 8:15 p.m. with the president of SAF, fourth-year bioengineering major Ashley Thomas, commenting on the importance of bringing Singh and Maqbool. Historically, Pakistan and India have had political and socioeconomic tension, yet Singh and Maqbool show that unity is possible. “(Singh and Maqbool) were able to step out of their countries and do a show together is a very powerful message to state,” stated Thomas. “That is why we wanted to bring these comedians here, to show the South Asian student population at UCR that that is something that’s possible.”

Danish Maqbool came on stage to start his comedy routine. Maqbool’s relaxed personality complimented his dry yet bold humor as he commented on Trump, prejudice within communities of color and his experience facing discrimination as a Pakistani-American. “It’s hard looking like me in this country, but we still have to make it work,” Maqbool said. Maqbool’s routine included making fun of the tension in the room from the issues he joked about.

Maqbool then introduced Singh and left the stage. Singh’s comedy routine was energetic and unapologetic as his jokes poked fun at relationships, dating and how people are too sensitive in this day and age. “I’m not afraid to joke about controversial things because if you can’t laugh about painful things, there’s no other way to cope,” Singh commented.

Afterwards, Maqbool joined Singh on stage, and they both answered questions from the audience. Both playfully teased the audience on their attire and majors throughout the Q&A section. Though the two of them did not directly comment on tensions between India and Pakistan, they shared their experience in the comedy realm.

“They’re two people with two different backgrounds, but ultimately they’re part of a society,” said Vishal Kumar Gupta, SAF’s Creative Director and fourth-year biology major. “They show us that we all face similar circumstances, and we’re not as different as we think.”

Many students in the audience expressed similar sentiments. “As someone who is Bengali (Bangladeshi), it was a funny show and it was cool to see an Indian and Pakistani collaborating because it’s not very common,” stated Alvee Ahmed, a second-year neuroscience major. “South Asian countries should have unification because we’re all minorities and have many things in common, so I hope to see more collaborations similar to theirs.”

The post ‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy appeared first on Highlander.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy

Erica Haas/HIGHLANDER
Danish Maqbool is a stand-up comedian from New Jersey.

The South Asian Federation (SAF) in collaboration with Asian Pacific Student Programs hosted their first comedy show, “In Unity we Stand featuring Akaash Singh and Danish Maqbool” on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Around 160 students, families, and community members gathered at HUB 302N to relax and enjoy Maqbool and Singh’s comedy. Maqbool is a Pakistan-American stand-up comedian from New Jersey. Singh is an Indian-American stand-up comedian known for his roles in Netflix’s “Brown Nation,” and MTV’s “Wild N’ Out,” “Joking Off” and “Guy Code.”

The show started at 8:15 p.m. with the president of SAF, fourth-year bioengineering major Ashley Thomas, commenting on the importance of bringing Singh and Maqbool. Historically, Pakistan and India have had political and socioeconomic tension, yet Singh and Maqbool show that unity is possible. “(Singh and Maqbool) were able to step out of their countries and do a show together is a very powerful message to state,” stated Thomas. “That is why we wanted to bring these comedians here, to show the South Asian student population at UCR that that is something that’s possible.”

Danish Maqbool came on stage to start his comedy routine. Maqbool’s relaxed personality complimented his dry yet bold humor as he commented on Trump, prejudice within communities of color and his experience facing discrimination as a Pakistani-American. “It’s hard looking like me in this country, but we still have to make it work,” Maqbool said. Maqbool’s routine included making fun of the tension in the room from the issues he joked about.

Maqbool then introduced Singh and left the stage. Singh’s comedy routine was energetic and unapologetic as his jokes poked fun at relationships, dating and how people are too sensitive in this day and age. “I’m not afraid to joke about controversial things because if you can’t laugh about painful things, there’s no other way to cope,” Singh commented.

Afterwards, Maqbool joined Singh on stage, and they both answered questions from the audience. Both playfully teased the audience on their attire and majors throughout the Q&A section. Though the two of them did not directly comment on tensions between India and Pakistan, they shared their experience in the comedy realm.

“They’re two people with two different backgrounds, but ultimately they’re part of a society,” said Vishal Kumar Gupta, SAF’s Creative Director and fourth-year biology major. “They show us that we all face similar circumstances, and we’re not as different as we think.”

Many students in the audience expressed similar sentiments. “As someone who is Bengali (Bangladeshi), it was a funny show and it was cool to see an Indian and Pakistani collaborating because it’s not very common,” stated Alvee Ahmed, a second-year neuroscience major. “South Asian countries should have unification because we’re all minorities and have many things in common, so I hope to see more collaborations similar to theirs.”

The post ‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy appeared first on Highlander.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy

Erica Haas/HIGHLANDER
Danish Maqbool is a stand-up comedian from New Jersey.

The South Asian Federation (SAF) in collaboration with Asian Pacific Student Programs hosted their first comedy show, “In Unity we Stand featuring Akaash Singh and Danish Maqbool” on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Around 160 students, families, and community members gathered at HUB 302N to relax and enjoy Maqbool and Singh’s comedy. Maqbool is a Pakistan-American stand-up comedian from New Jersey. Singh is an Indian-American stand-up comedian known for his roles in Netflix’s “Brown Nation,” and MTV’s “Wild N’ Out,” “Joking Off” and “Guy Code.”

The show started at 8:15 p.m. with the president of SAF, fourth-year bioengineering major Ashley Thomas, commenting on the importance of bringing Singh and Maqbool. Historically, Pakistan and India have had political and socioeconomic tension, yet Singh and Maqbool show that unity is possible. “(Singh and Maqbool) were able to step out of their countries and do a show together is a very powerful message to state,” stated Thomas. “That is why we wanted to bring these comedians here, to show the South Asian student population at UCR that that is something that’s possible.”

Danish Maqbool came on stage to start his comedy routine. Maqbool’s relaxed personality complimented his dry yet bold humor as he commented on Trump, prejudice within communities of color and his experience facing discrimination as a Pakistani-American. “It’s hard looking like me in this country, but we still have to make it work,” Maqbool said. Maqbool’s routine included making fun of the tension in the room from the issues he joked about.

Maqbool then introduced Singh and left the stage. Singh’s comedy routine was energetic and unapologetic as his jokes poked fun at relationships, dating and how people are too sensitive in this day and age. “I’m not afraid to joke about controversial things because if you can’t laugh about painful things, there’s no other way to cope,” Singh commented.

Afterwards, Maqbool joined Singh on stage, and they both answered questions from the audience. Both playfully teased the audience on their attire and majors throughout the Q&A section. Though the two of them did not directly comment on tensions between India and Pakistan, they shared their experience in the comedy realm.

“They’re two people with two different backgrounds, but ultimately they’re part of a society,” said Vishal Kumar Gupta, SAF’s Creative Director and fourth-year biology major. “They show us that we all face similar circumstances, and we’re not as different as we think.”

Many students in the audience expressed similar sentiments. “As someone who is Bengali (Bangladeshi), it was a funny show and it was cool to see an Indian and Pakistani collaborating because it’s not very common,” stated Alvee Ahmed, a second-year neuroscience major. “South Asian countries should have unification because we’re all minorities and have many things in common, so I hope to see more collaborations similar to theirs.”

The post ‘In Unity We Stand’ brings together the South Asian community in the spirit of comedy appeared first on Highlander.

***

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The Caf is closing. Here’s what students think.

With the demolition of Forrer Hall only a month away, we asked students around campus for their thoughts on cramming the whole school into Transylvania University’s secondary Cafeteria; the smaller and further away “Rafskeller.”

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The Blue Wave was Real. Let’s examine the facts.

As far as I know, Midterm 2018 election night might not be remembered by many people due to the pace of the news cycle, but I remember it all too well. The early results were in, and they were not looking great. The Democratic Party could not flip a long-coveted seat in Kentucky-06, the infamous needle kept swinging to eventually become a 1 in 2 chance, and it looked likely that we were on the verge of allowing a Republican Senate to hold on, and even expand. But, as results kept coming in, the results kept getting better, contrary to the media, the punditry and people so rash to make a fast hot-take for the most clicks. Evidence clearly shows that this past election was in fact, yet another wave election, with more in common to 2010 and 2006, than a year like 2002 or 1998.

The first elephant in the room to discuss is that the Democratic Party, picked up north of 40 seats on the Federal level. That in itself is not an insignificant number, if we take a long look at the historical trend lines and data points that can connect us to this historic achievement. Firstly, the last midterm election for the Democratic Party with “wave” results was in 2006, fully 12 years ago, and that itself was considered a wave because they only picked up a comparatively anemic 29 seats. In fact, according to the data, this is the highest pickup total since 1974, the midterm after the largest modern political scandal in American history, Watergate.

Another point detractors tend to make to counter the assertion of a wave is that the Democratic Party lost ground, rather than making ground, in the U.S. Senate. That claim, while true, does not look at how historically bad this map was for the Democrats. According to the data journalist Nate Silver at FiveThirtyEight, this was the single worst U.S. Senate map for the opposition party since direct elections were allotted by the 18th Amendment. Another thing that makes this claim difficult to assert is that, while four incumbent senators from the opposing party did lose, Democrats did elect two new Senators, including Kyrsten Sinema, the first Democrat from Arizona in over 30 years, as well as Jacky Rosen by a six-point margin in the swing state of Nevada. This indicates that it was not quite the blowout loss the punditry attempted to make it out to be.

Another important note, the Democrats had to defend ten seats in states the President carried two years earlier, and what was even more unique was that in five of them (North Dakota, West Virginia, Missouri, Montana and Indiana), the President won by more than 15 points. And yet, in West Virginia, for example, incumbent senator Joe Manchin’s election ran 45 points ahead of the last Democrat to run statewide two years ago, resulting in a 3.2% victory. In addition, 27 of the 33 democratic candidates up for re-election in the Senate outperformed polling website FiveThirtyEight’s partisan lean trackings, an impressive achievement in itself.

A final counterpoint to lay to rest the punditry. It is true that the Democrats did end up losing in Texas, Georgia and Florida. But we have to understand that the fact these states were competitive in the first place is an impressive achievement. Take the Democratic posterboy, Beto O’Rourke, a otherwise little-known El-Paso area congressman taking on incumbent Senate titan Ted Cruz. He actually overperformed the polls, and accumulated a total of nearly 4.1 million votes, the highest for a Democrat in the history of the state, including presidential elections.  And in the case of Florida, we must understand that the state, while a swing state, had a superior turnout operation in rural areas by Republicans, in addition to a myriad of other factors, such as delayed or ineffectual outreach on behalf of Senator Bill Nelson to Hispanic voters.

This election, by any objective standard, was indeed a wave, and a historic one indeed. Instead of trying to assert the fastest hot-take, maybe we can all be wiser by instead taking a closer look at the data and having a more sobered, nuanced outlook. An outlook that understands that maybe the election night punditry and rush to the fastest hot-take might obscure, rather than make clear what kind of America we all woke up to.

 

The post The Blue Wave was Real. Let’s examine the facts. appeared first on Highlander.

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The True Meaning of Christmas

The end of the year is an amazing thing. One moment you’re sitting down with loved ones eating turkey and stuffing, then the next thing you know you’re suddenly transported to a makeshift North Pole. Gone are the pumpkins and ghosts, and in come the giant inflatable snowmen, pine trees and a never-ending marathon of “Here Comes Santa Claus.” Of course, it’s not all bad. Christmas is fun and it brings people together, but in a society where Christmas is so heavily commercialized, we have to ask ourselves: What is the true meaning of Christmas? Where did it come from? And where is it going?

These questions have been on people’s minds for generations, whether in regards to the holiday’s supposed origins in paganism, the overly commercialized aspect of it or the argument over how Christmas should be celebrated.

To claim that Christmas is or ever was a pagan holiday is absurd, as it is based in Christian roots. The confusion here spreads because Christmas was adopted as an official holiday about 300 years after Christ’s death and resurrection. This was the same time that pagans, who were non-Jewish and non-Christian people, celebrated the winter solstice. As the cultures interacted, some traditions were adopted like decorating trees. But Christmas was never intended to be anything other than a celebration of Christ.

The stronger argument over the true meaning of Christmas lays in the presents under the tree. With many people restlessly waiting for their gifts, shopping on Black Friday for the best deals and images of Santa Claus—not Jesus—in just about every store, one has to wonder whether we are celebrating Christmas for Christ or if we’re putting more emphasis on money and material goods.

A 2017 study conducted by the Pew Research Center claims that 90 percent of all Americans celebrate Christmas, though another study conducted by the same group claims that Christmas in the U.S. is becoming increasingly more secular. The study states that Americans are not going to church services throughout the holiday as much as previous generations and do not believe the story of Jesus’s birth is factual, compared to a 2013 study that showed stronger faith in these aspects. Although the majority of the population still believes Christmas is a religious holiday, there is an increase of people who claim that it is not. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of all is that more than half of Americans are not bothered by this.

In essence, the majority of the population in the United States of America believe that Christmas is a Christian holiday, but do not believe it should be celebrated as such. This is a slight but dramatic change from previous generations as it indicates an emphasis on ourselves and our possessions rather than in Christ.

Given the foundations of Christianity, it is easy to look at this in a negative light. Throughout the Gospels, Jesus often preached against the love of money, telling people to leave their possessions behind and follow him. “Indeed, it is easier for a camel to pass through an eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God,” he says (Luke 18:25). But what many people miss is that Jesus also commanded us to help each other.  A big way to do this is through money. Acts 4:32-35 says, “All the believers were one in heart and mind. No one claimed that any of their possessions was their own, but they shared everything they had.”

We know that the meaning of Christmas—the reason for the holiday’s conception—has always been to celebrate Christ. So why is it bad that we focus so much on gifts, money and possessions? It’s because, at the heart of things, being a Christian is about loving your neighbor and loving God. Giving gifts to loved ones, neighbors and those in need are good Christian things to do because they are done with love and help our communities grow. But if we view the holiday as increasingly secular, and focus on receiving gifts rather than sharing the word or giving to others, we are not fulfilling the true meaning and purpose of Christmas.

The holiday is about giving and loving. It’s about being thankful for all that God has done for us, perhaps even more than we are on Thanksgiving. Christmas is a day to remember the biggest gift we’ve ever received and to try our best to represent that in all aspects of our lives, including sharing our faith with others. Knowing the true meaning of Christmas is knowing the truth about God and glorifying that fact with the world, whether it’s marketable or not.

 

The post The True Meaning of Christmas appeared first on ZU Media.

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Stranded for the holidays

Few dining options available for students remaining on campus during winter break.

As the fall semester nears its end, students and faculty start to dream of the sweet release of winter break. Most head home for a well-deserved rest and some holiday cheer, but students staying on campus have little to no options in terms of food or entertainment.

An overturned snowman at Los Olivos, which will be closed during winter break. (Eileen Qiu | The Poly Post)

Students living in the suites or the dorms have few options for sustenance during break. The only places open are Vista Market near the suites, Subway and PolyFresh in the BSC and the Pony Express near the CLA. However, those establishments will only be open for the first week of break from Dec. 17- Dec. 23.

Los Olivos dining commons will host a holiday luncheon Thursday, Dec. 6 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Brandon Gomez, a fifth-year accounting student who works at Los Olivos said the luncheon is the only holiday-themed event offered at the dining commons.

“Other than that [the luncheon], we’re going to be closed for basically all of break,” Gomez said.

Options for food might be limited, but the Games Room Etc. in the Bronco Student Center will be open for students who might be bored during the holidays.

Emily Slack is a fourth-year accounting student who works at the front desk of the games room. She said there aren’t any events specifically geared toward holiday festivities, but the games room will still be open during the first week of break if students on campus want to go play games.

Alex Chang, a fourth-year mechanical engineering major who lives at the University Village, said he stayed on campus during break when he was in his third year of college and still regrets it.

“There was just nothing to do, and the campus was literally empty,” Chang said.

He said he had to stay on campus for an additional week after fall 2017 finals ended before catching a flight back home. Chang said that because most students and faculty leave campus, he understands why campus usually closes during break, but he would appreciate more options in terms of meals for individuals like him.

Rachel Nascarenas, a secretary from the housing office, said there aren’t any specific events catered to students who stay on campus during break, but resident advisors (RAs) will be on duty during break, except on Dec. 25 and Jan. 1.

“The office will be open, so students can call us or an RA if they have questions or contact university police if there is an emergency,” Nascarenas said.

The post Stranded for the holidays appeared first on The Poly Post.

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Non-binary student pioneers in social work

CSUN student Ronnie Veliz, 34, knew they were different since they were 4 years old.

“When I was a little kid, I remember breaking so many gender norms and would often get in trouble for it,” said Veliz, who was assigned male at birth but identifies as gender non-binary.

Veliz is from Trujillo, Peru, a small town where the only mention of the LGBTQ+ community was of gay men during the AIDS epidemic. In fact, Veliz did not realize that there were more members of this community, including those who are gender non-binary, until they moved to the United States after being kicked out by their father for coming out as gay.

When they first moved to the U.S., Veliz was homeless for nine months because they were afraid of reaching out to a social worker.

“I didn’t feel like I could reach out to these people, because I was worried they wouldn’t relate to me,” they said.

According to the U.S. census, women make up 80 percent of social workers in the United States, and 67 percent of all people in this occupation are white.

“I worry about the same dynamic, and it’s true that the history of social work is very white, cisgender and female,” said Katie Mortimer, the executive director of field education, contracts and admissions in the social work department of CSUN. “Our Master of Social Work (MSW) program is especially trying to reach out to more diverse, vulnerable people who represent the communities we’re trying to help.”

However, Sonya Keith said, a program operations supervisor at Tarzana Treatment Center, social workers have to meet certain professional standards, which include cultural competency.

“Learning that not everyone has the same power struggles and privilege that I do helped me open up to what someone is really living — not what I assume they experience because of what I know,” said Keith.

Keith further expressed the emotional intelligence required in her field.

“Thinking like a social worker is different than thinking like somebody’s friend,” added Keith. “I openly judge my friends because we have already established that I value them. Social work is different.”

Veliz is now training to be a social worker in CSUN’s MSW program.

“I want to create the first organization in the Valley that is run by and helps people who are LGBTQ+, immigrants and people with disabilities,” Veliz said.

When Veliz started CSUN as a psychology major in 2011 they created a club called Matadors for Equality (MFE) which they described as “a safe space for immigrants, the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities to discuss their similarities, not their differences.”

MFE won the 2012-2013 Matador Involvement Center Commitment to Social Justice Award. Veliz received their B.A. in psychology in 2012, and graduated with honors.

However, it took Veliz most of their college years to figure out their gender identity.

“I had to wait until college to know there were lesbians and trans people too, but it took me longer to accept who I was,” they said. “I was so hungry for knowledge to find out my gender and sexuality.”

In 2017 Veliz came out as non-binary.

“I thought it would be easier, but it wasn’t,” they said.

Despite the legalization of same-sex marriage in the United States in 2015 and overall increase of acceptance of the LGBTQ+ community in the United States, a memo leaked in October implied that the Trump administration wanted to define gender only by the genitalia someone is born with and nothing else.

“It took us so long for the country to accept us, and now the president wants to eliminate us,” said Veliz. “There are not many role models who are are trans and non-binary. What did we do to you?”

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Six Morgan State football players selected to All-MEAC team

Six players on the Morgan State University football team were named to the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference teams.

Not only is this the most players that have been selected since 2014, where there were eight players voted in, but this is also the first time since 2014 where a Morgan State player was named to the first team.

Linebacker, Ian McBorrough, and sophomore standout defensive back were voted to the MEAC all-conference first team. Rico Kennedy, a defensive lineman, was voted in for the second year in the row, but this year as part of the second team with linebacker Damare’ Whitaker. Being selected to the third team was offensive lineman Joshua Miles and placekicker Alex Raya.

McBorrough said it was a big honor for him, however, he insisted he couldn’t take all the credit because of the numerous great players he takes the field with on defense.

“It was a big honor for me to represent my teammates and university, but I think it just goes to show how hard we work as a team defensively,” McBorrough said. “With all the guys I have around me like Rico Kennedy [and] Damare’ Whitaker – those guys push me every day to be the best player I can be.”

McBorrough was part of the dominant linebacker group with Whitaker who ranked first in total tackles. The two of them combined 170 total tackles. In addition, Kennedy ranked top ten in tackles for loss with 10 and sacks with 4.5.

The Maryland native didn’t forget to mention the help he receives from the defensive line and the help of the defensive backs which include Donte Small.

Donte Small was selected to the MEAC all-conference first team in just his sophomore season.  Small, played with a chip on his shoulder, dedicating this season to some family members who recently died.

“It was a goal [for me this season]. Just understanding I lost some close family members last year. I just wanted to show that I could really do it and I just put my mind to it,” Small said.

Small finished second in passes defended with 11 and also tied for first in interceptions with four.

Miles, on the other hand, was the only offensive player selected for the bears. Miles allowed only one sack this season and helped the Bears run game to be effective. In addition, Miles has been invited to the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl and East vs West Shrine game.

Placekicker Raya was able to improve from last season where he finished 1-7 on field goal attempts. In 2018, the senior made 10-14 field goal attempts including a game-winner against North Carolina A&T.

This season McBorrough and Small said they embraced their leadership roles and believe the team has the potential to get better. Next season, however, the two leaders said the team has to be consistent and win more games than they lose.

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Appalachian Chorale brings together students and community members in song

Uncommon, though not unique, the Appalachian Chorale brings together students and the Boone community.  

While it fulfills an ensemble requirement for students, only 40 of the 108 members are registered for the class. The rest of the choir is community members ranging from unregistered students, alumni, faculty and Boone residents.

The group practices together each spring and fall semester to sing for its end-of-semester concert. Linda Larson, the choir’s conductor, considers the variety of skills and backgrounds to be the strength of the choir.

Because there are no auditions for the chorale, people have varying experiences in choirs. Larson asks less experienced singers to take a leap of faith. She does not pace rehearsals for the least experienced member.

Conducting a choir with such differences can be a challenge, Larson said. However, each singer has their strengths and weaknesses. The phrases and notes that a singer can do well contribute to the sound of the choir.

“Nobody is responsible for every note,” Larson said. “We have a collective responsibility.”

Larson takes time to engage with her singers. She teaches them proper vocal techniques and styles along with the concert pieces.

I took individual voice lessons for several years,” Joe Lowman, a community member, said. “Much of what Dr. Larson teaches us about good singing is the same as I was exposed to in individual study.”

Larson challenges the choir with the songs she chooses. She aims to find variety that will interest and engage the singers and the audience.

The mission of the choir is to sing the choral masterworks. Each concert has a feature item, which can range from 15 to 40 minutes. The rest of the hour-long concert is filled in with smaller pieces.

“This is a place to get different music, to get a pretty serious level of music,” Larson said. “I try not to do only dead, white, European males.”

By coincidence, this semester’s feature piece is part one of Handel’s “Messiah.”

Many choirs sing “Messiah” every year at Christmas, particularly in churches. Larson said the piece is not overrated. It is difficult to sing despite its popularity.

Larson purposefully made her interpretation different than the typical interpretation. A small group will be singing parts of “Messiah as part of this interpretation. The small groups consists of 20 singers from the choir who auditioned. They were chosen for their vocal skills and ability to learn notes on their own.  

The rest of the chorale and our audience will be impressed by the high quality of our performance,” Lowman said. “I have sung in small select groups before and know what is both required and possible. Linda has brought our small group along in a remarkably short number of weeks through 30-minute rehearsals after our main rehearsal.”

Larson also encourages each f the members to really pay attention to what they are singing.

“A lot of folks are familiar with Handel’s ‘Messiah,’” Ralph Seamon, a community member, said. “Linda’s actually able to push us a lot harder on this because we know the parts, so she’s able to bring a lot more out of us.”

Abby Betinis’ caroling piece “Come In, Come Inwill begin the concert as a welcoming piece. It is sung as a round, a melody that is started at different times and sung together.

Traditionally going last in the concert, Larson made Mozart’s “Ave Verum Corpus the second piece. Larson started this tradition as a way of acknowledging older choir members and inviting them to sing.

Larson wanted to keep the piece last, but felt that the “Hallelujah Chorus” was much more fitting to end the concert.

Although the spring semester concert isn’t until April 30, Larson already has her feature piece picked out.

The chorale will sing Donald McCullough’s “Holocaust Cantata” at the concert less than a week before Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, on May 2.

The 40-minute cantata was inspired by music sung by inmates in the concentration camps during the Holocaust. The movements are inspired by the melodies McCullough found in the archives of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

The cantata will have a mix of choir, solos and spoken word.

Larson will coordinate with the Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Peace Studies.

The concert is free and will be held Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. in the Rosen Concert Hall.

Story and photo by Nyctea Martell, A&E Reporter

Featured photo caption: Larson conducts the small group as the practice a chorus from “Messiah”. The singers are expected to learn the notes and home and prepare for rehearsal to focus on polishing the piece.

The post Appalachian Chorale brings together students and community members in song appeared first on The Appalachian Online.

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Men’s Basketball glides past NDNU

Cougars’ bench was too much to handle in 87-38 victory

Azusa Pacific never looked troubled on Saturday, Dec. 1 against Notre Dame de Namur as they took the lead early in the first half and never looked back. An offensive onslaught combined with suffocating defense propelled the Cougars to a 87-38 victory over the Argonauts.

After giving up two free throws, Senior guard Will Ferris’s three pointer gave Azusa Pacific the only lead the team needed on Saturday. The Argonauts kept the game close until about midway through the first half, but Azusa Pacific was firing on all cylinders. The Cougars forced missed shots on the defensive end while converting their chances on offense. They blew the game open with about seven minutes left in the first half, taking a commanding 20 point lead into the break.

Although the Cougars led 47-27 at half time, complacency never set in, especially on the defensive end of the floor. Azusa Pacific allowed only 11 points in the second half and held the Argonauts to just 27.3 percent shooting. On offense, the scoring came in bunches off the bench for the Cougars. Ben Taufahema, Terrence Becvar, Jake Spurgeon and Tyson Kanseyo all contributed double-digit points as the Cougars’ bench piled on 55 points.

The Cougars were led by Becvar on offense, as he was a perfect 5-5 from three point range and finished with 15 points. Taufahema and Gerritt Beetstra each had 12 points while Will Ferris and Jake Spurgeon finished with 11 points. Tyson Kanseyo posted a double-double, ending the night with 10 points and 11 rebounds.

The Cougars will begin a five-game road trip on Wednesday, Dec. 5 when they travel to Concordia. They will then make the trip to Point Loma on Saturday, Dec. 8 before their first Cornerstone Cup matchup with Biola on Saturday, Dec. 15.

The post Men’s Basketball glides past NDNU appeared first on ZU Media.

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The Center Will Hold

Source: http://blog.yalebooks.com/2017/02/14/asian-migration-and-the-history-of-now/

The history of Asian Americans and their activism at Yale

On a Wednesday morning, the words “Department of Justice,” “discrimination,” and “Asian-American applicants” appeared in a Yale campus-wide email by President Peter Salovey. Like Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) v. Harvard, a case which first rankled the country a year ago, the position of Asian Americans as a model minority separate from other minorities came into question once again. In the email, Salovey defends Yale’s commitment to diversity. He cites an increase in the percentage of Asian Americans in the Class of 2022, from less than 14 percent fifteen years ago to 21.7 percent today.

In 1854, Yung Wing — the first Asian Yale student — attended Yale as an international student from China, long before Asians had become culturally set apart from other minorities in national discourse. He was also the first Chinese person to graduate from a U.S. college. In fact, Wing was an active member on campus, a member of DKE and Brothers in Unity, a literary society. He later organized the Chinese Educational Mission, which sent Chinese students to study abroad in the United States; however, his U.S citizenship was later revoked due to anti-Chinese immigration laws. At this time in the United States, Asians and Asian Americans, like other racial minorities, faced unjust de jure discrimination by the federal government that separated them from white Americans.

Rockwell “Rocky” Chin, GRD ’71, who currently serves as Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity & Diversity at the New York State Division of Human Rights, participated in forming the Asian American Students Association (AASA) while he was a student at Yale. Chin’s family history at Yale extends through much of the 20th century. “Our history goes back to Yung Wing,” he begins, “but since then the position of Asian Americans has grown through time.” In fact, Chin comes from a lineage of Yalies: his grandfather graduated Yale in 1908 and his father, Rockwood Q.P. Chin, graduated in the 1930s. Chin explains in an email, “my own curiosity [about this time period] comes from the fact that my American-born father attended Yale [when] there were only a handful of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders then!”

Yale’s current makeup differs dramatically from its historical reputation as an old boys’ club. Once upon a time, white Protestant males from upper class American families overwhelmed the ranks of each class. As Jasmine Zhuang, GH ’13, aptly describes in the Yale Historical Review, diversity meant only that there was a “small proportion of students who attended public schools.” Facing fierce backlash from alumni, Yale President Kingman Brewster, Jr., implemented initiatives in Yale’s admissions processes to increase the school’s diversity. Minority student populations started to grow.

In 1969, the Asian American Students Association — now called the Asian American Students Alliance — was established as the first iteration of an Asian American Yale student group. Later, in 1981, the Asian American Cultural Center (AACC), one of the four current cultural houses, was established.

Though Chin only attended Yale for two years, from 1969 to 1971, it was “the first time there was critical mass of Asian Pacific Americans at Yale,” which included Don Nakanishi, SY ’71, who was one of the leaders of the formation of AASA in 1969. Although there was a larger Asian American population than ever before, Nakanishi still describes the amount of Asian Americans as a “drop in the bucket” when he attended the school, with exactly 59 Asians at Yale College.

In Chin’s time, there were no Asian American studies courses and no Asian American student groups. Yale had just begun to admit women, and the United States had just begun implementing affirmative action. “We all worked very closely with the Chicano and the Black students.” Chin explains, “At Yale, we all felt we were a kind of minority. We felt somewhat isolated, except when we were together. There were a lot of common issues: ethnic studies, how the University did not relate to the Black communities that worked in New Haven, etc.”

Today’s Yale echoes similar underpinnings of solidarity. Like many of its peer institutions, Yale has grown in diversity. In recent discourse, however, Asian American-ness has been grouped with whiteness and pushed away from other communities of color. In fact, in the Yale Daily News’ staff-written piece, “Our diversity problem,” published on Oct. 29, the News Desk added an editor’s note to reassure that “in pointing out that East Asians are well represented in our Managing Board, [they] did not intend to dismiss the discrimination that East Asians face in accessing top leadership in institutions like the News, or to make the point that they are proximal to whiteness.”

The ongoing debate about Asian discrimination through affirmative action rests on the “model minority” myth — a term first coined in 1966 in The New York Times Magazine by sociologist William Petersen. The “model minority” myth describes the perceived phenomena of a minority achieving higher socioeconomic success than the population average. It has changed the dialogue of Asian Americans in the United States in the context of American race issues. However, the AACC and many — but not all — Asian Americans at Yale still support affirmative action and stand in solidarity with other minorities.

In an official statement, Joliana Yee, Director of the AACC, expresses hope that students “will come to see how a race-conscious, whole-person approach to admissions is necessary to strengthening our communities of learning and a step in the right direction for improving access, equity and inclusion in higher education.” This support for affirmative action is echoed among many Asians on campus.

Kathy Min, BR ’21, an Asian American student at Yale, feels that solidarity among people of color is important and still abundant at Yale. “We’re at a pretty political campus, and many are quite politically conscious,” Min explains. She adds, however, that both solidarity and division have arisen within Asian Americans and other racial minorities on campus. “A lot of Asian Americans are against affirmative action; they have very misplaced anger that it is hurting them,” she notes. The notion that some Asian Americans stand against affirmative action, and thus, other minorities, is addressed in Yee’s email as she tries to dispel the idea that affirmative action’s perceived negatives outweigh its positives.

The AACC still serves as a space for Asian Americans that recognizes the possible difficulties of being a racial minority at Yale. However, the “model minority” myth and public perception of Asian American positionality has contributed to a certain reputation of compliance. Rita Wang, MC ’19, a first-year counselor and former AACC peer liaison, however, notes that she has discussed discrimination with her first-years in the form of microaggressions and stereotypes. “I grew up with the stereotype that Asian Americans were politically inactive and compliant,” Wang notes, “so I was really interested in pushing that notion.” As a peer liaison at the AACC, Wang has noted that it is unfair to say that the AACC is “less activist.”

Reflecting on the AACC, Chin says, “It was a concession by Yale, I think, to address some of the requests and demands of the Asian American students. It did not exist when I was there.” In 1972, AASA was given a one-room office in the basement of Durfee. Four years later in 1977, the East Coast Asian American Student Union founded a Yale chapter, and in 1981, the AACC was established.

AASA is rooted in a history of activism. The creators of AASA advocated for the first Asian American Studies class at Yale, eventually titled “The Asian American Experience,” and in 1971 founded the Amerasia Journal, an Asian American newsletter that is now a premier academic publication in Asian American Studies.

However, even in 1969, Asian Americans came up against the notion that they did not face true discrimination compared to other racial minorities. In fact, in a 1969 statement to the Yale Daily News, Peter M.C. Choy, YC ’69, LAW ’72, explains that one of the most difficult stereotypes that AASA needed to overcome was “that Asian Americans are perfectly assimilated and face no discrimination in American society.” Brewster echoes that statement in a memorandum of the same year that even among those most politically conscious, there is the misconception that “what problems they may have are qualitatively and quantitatively minor.”

Still, this American era was politically charged. It was a time of protests, activism, and Civil Rights conflict. Chin and Nakanishi’s generation became involved in the student movement and the anti-war movement. “By the time I entered Yale, my eyes had been opened to the importance and problems regarding [the] lack of racial diversity, and how student mobilization could work,” Chin explains.

The Asian American Studies course was another example of student involvement. While many Asian American students had actively participated in on-campus political actions through other on-campus minority groups, they felt that academic inclusion was necessary to address the Asian American community’s unique problems and history. Professor Chitoshi Yanaga taught “The Asian American Experience,” but described the course’s creation as a student effort. Choy explains in his 1969 statement that Asian Americans at Yale hoped that the material addressed in the class would challenge the notion that Asian Americans faced little discrimination.

Some Asian American students report that in extracurricular settings, Asian American-ness is unintentionally lumped together with whiteness. Wang, who was former Speaker of the Yale Political Union (YPU), explains that the YPU board “struggled with seeing me as the only woman of color,” often talking to her as if she were a member of the white majority. For students like Wang, the AACC provides a space where the Asian American experience isn’t grouped in with white experience.

Tina Lu, Head of Pauli Murray College, who resides on the Advisory Board of the AACC, notes that the AACC is extremely interconnected with the other campus cultural groups. “The AACC has always been super clear about how it is part of a social world involving other cultural centers, that it is one of many,” she states, reflecting back on the history of Asian Americans at Yale in conjunction with other minority groups.

With the recent affirmative action complaints levied against Yale and Harvard, the original core values of AASA in comparison with today’s manifestation of the AACC and Asian Americans at Yale come under closer scrutiny. Min and Wang both indicate there are some Asian Americans who stand in opposition to affirmative action and the benefits it may give to other minorities. Professor Daniel HoSang, Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, states that there is still widespread support amongst Asian American college students for programs that promote diversity and equality. “The first generation of Asian American Yale students of the 1960s and ’70s were very, very clear that their interests were fully aligned with other students of color,” HoSang explains. “But, of course, any time that groups grow bigger or become diverse — as the Asian American population at Yale has become, there’s going to be ideological and political disagreements.”

The AACC has grown a lot since 1969, when Civil Rights issues dominated the national dialogue and only a few years after the immigration ban was lifted, yet it still retains some essence of its original activist and intercultural origins. “We are in a moment of American politics where everything is at the surface,” says Lu, in reference to racial minorities in America. “All these conversations are coming together in very active ways.”

Even as new types of discrimination, stereotypes, and policies arise, the AACC and AASA continually aim to remain active, heard, and conscious.


The Center Will Hold was originally published in The Yale Herald on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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The Center Will Hold

Source: http://blog.yalebooks.com/2017/02/14/asian-migration-and-the-history-of-now/

The history of Asian Americans and their activism at Yale

On a Wednesday morning, the words “Department of Justice,” “discrimination,” and “Asian-American applicants” appeared in a Yale campus-wide email by President Peter Salovey. Like Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) v. Harvard, a case which first rankled the country a year ago, the position of Asian Americans as a model minority separate from other minorities came into question once again. In the email, Salovey defends Yale’s commitment to diversity. He cites an increase in the percentage of Asian Americans in the Class of 2022, from less than 14 percent fifteen years ago to 21.7 percent today.

In 1854, Yung Wing — the first Asian Yale student — attended Yale as an international student from China, long before Asians had become culturally set apart from other minorities in national discourse. He was also the first Chinese person to graduate from a U.S. college. In fact, Wing was an active member on campus, a member of DKE and Brothers in Unity, a literary society. He later organized the Chinese Educational Mission, which sent Chinese students to study abroad in the United States; however, his U.S citizenship was later revoked due to anti-Chinese immigration laws. At this time in the United States, Asians and Asian Americans, like other racial minorities, faced unjust de jure discrimination by the federal government that separated them from white Americans.

Rockwell “Rocky” Chin, GRD ’71, who currently serves as Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity & Diversity at the New York State Division of Human Rights, participated in forming the Asian American Students Association (AASA) while he was a student at Yale. Chin’s family history at Yale extends through much of the 20th century. “Our history goes back to Yung Wing,” he begins, “but since then the position of Asian Americans has grown through time.” In fact, Chin comes from a lineage of Yalies: his grandfather graduated Yale in 1908 and his father, Rockwood Q.P. Chin, graduated in the 1930s. Chin explains in an email, “my own curiosity [about this time period] comes from the fact that my American-born father attended Yale [when] there were only a handful of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders then!”

Yale’s current makeup differs dramatically from its historical reputation as an old boys’ club. Once upon a time, white Protestant males from upper class American families overwhelmed the ranks of each class. As Jasmine Zhuang, GH ’13, aptly describes in the Yale Historical Review, diversity meant only that there was a “small proportion of students who attended public schools.” Facing fierce backlash from alumni, Yale President Kingman Brewster, Jr., implemented initiatives in Yale’s admissions processes to increase the school’s diversity. Minority student populations started to grow.

In 1969, the Asian American Students Association — now called the Asian American Students Alliance — was established as the first iteration of an Asian American Yale student group. Later, in 1981, the Asian American Cultural Center (AACC), one of the four current cultural houses, was established.

Though Chin only attended Yale for two years, from 1969 to 1971, it was “the first time there was critical mass of Asian Pacific Americans at Yale,” which included Don Nakanishi, SY ’71, who was one of the leaders of the formation of AASA in 1969. Although there was a larger Asian American population than ever before, Nakanishi still describes the amount of Asian Americans as a “drop in the bucket” when he attended the school, with exactly 59 Asians at Yale College.

In Chin’s time, there were no Asian American studies courses and no Asian American student groups. Yale had just begun to admit women, and the United States had just begun implementing affirmative action. “We all worked very closely with the Chicano and the Black students.” Chin explains, “At Yale, we all felt we were a kind of minority. We felt somewhat isolated, except when we were together. There were a lot of common issues: ethnic studies, how the University did not relate to the Black communities that worked in New Haven, etc.”

Today’s Yale echoes similar underpinnings of solidarity. Like many of its peer institutions, Yale has grown in diversity. In recent discourse, however, Asian American-ness has been grouped with whiteness and pushed away from other communities of color. In fact, in the Yale Daily News’ staff-written piece, “Our diversity problem,” published on Oct. 29, the News Desk added an editor’s note to reassure that “in pointing out that East Asians are well represented in our Managing Board, [they] did not intend to dismiss the discrimination that East Asians face in accessing top leadership in institutions like the News, or to make the point that they are proximal to whiteness.”

The ongoing debate about Asian discrimination through affirmative action rests on the “model minority” myth — a term first coined in 1966 in The New York Times Magazine by sociologist William Petersen. The “model minority” myth describes the perceived phenomena of a minority achieving higher socioeconomic success than the population average. It has changed the dialogue of Asian Americans in the United States in the context of American race issues. However, the AACC and many — but not all — Asian Americans at Yale still support affirmative action and stand in solidarity with other minorities.

In an official statement, Joliana Yee, Director of the AACC, expresses hope that students “will come to see how a race-conscious, whole-person approach to admissions is necessary to strengthening our communities of learning and a step in the right direction for improving access, equity and inclusion in higher education.” This support for affirmative action is echoed among many Asians on campus.

Kathy Min, BR ’21, an Asian American student at Yale, feels that solidarity among people of color is important and still abundant at Yale. “We’re at a pretty political campus, and many are quite politically conscious,” Min explains. She adds, however, that both solidarity and division have arisen within Asian Americans and other racial minorities on campus. “A lot of Asian Americans are against affirmative action; they have very misplaced anger that it is hurting them,” she notes. The notion that some Asian Americans stand against affirmative action, and thus, other minorities, is addressed in Yee’s email as she tries to dispel the idea that affirmative action’s perceived negatives outweigh its positives.

The AACC still serves as a space for Asian Americans that recognizes the possible difficulties of being a racial minority at Yale. However, the “model minority” myth and public perception of Asian American positionality has contributed to a certain reputation of compliance. Rita Wang, MC ’19, a first-year counselor and former AACC peer liaison, however, notes that she has discussed discrimination with her first-years in the form of microaggressions and stereotypes. “I grew up with the stereotype that Asian Americans were politically inactive and compliant,” Wang notes, “so I was really interested in pushing that notion.” As a peer liaison at the AACC, Wang has noted that it is unfair to say that the AACC is “less activist.”

Reflecting on the AACC, Chin says, “It was a concession by Yale, I think, to address some of the requests and demands of the Asian American students. It did not exist when I was there.” In 1972, AASA was given a one-room office in the basement of Durfee. Four years later in 1977, the East Coast Asian American Student Union founded a Yale chapter, and in 1981, the AACC was established.

AASA is rooted in a history of activism. The creators of AASA advocated for the first Asian American Studies class at Yale, eventually titled “The Asian American Experience,” and in 1971 founded the Amerasia Journal, an Asian American newsletter that is now a premier academic publication in Asian American Studies.

However, even in 1969, Asian Americans came up against the notion that they did not face true discrimination compared to other racial minorities. In fact, in a 1969 statement to the Yale Daily News, Peter M.C. Choy, YC ’69, LAW ’72, explains that one of the most difficult stereotypes that AASA needed to overcome was “that Asian Americans are perfectly assimilated and face no discrimination in American society.” Brewster echoes that statement in a memorandum of the same year that even among those most politically conscious, there is the misconception that “what problems they may have are qualitatively and quantitatively minor.”

Still, this American era was politically charged. It was a time of protests, activism, and Civil Rights conflict. Chin and Nakanishi’s generation became involved in the student movement and the anti-war movement. “By the time I entered Yale, my eyes had been opened to the importance and problems regarding [the] lack of racial diversity, and how student mobilization could work,” Chin explains.

The Asian American Studies course was another example of student involvement. While many Asian American students had actively participated in on-campus political actions through other on-campus minority groups, they felt that academic inclusion was necessary to address the Asian American community’s unique problems and history. Professor Chitoshi Yanaga taught “The Asian American Experience,” but described the course’s creation as a student effort. Choy explains in his 1969 statement that Asian Americans at Yale hoped that the material addressed in the class would challenge the notion that Asian Americans faced little discrimination.

Some Asian American students report that in extracurricular settings, Asian American-ness is unintentionally lumped together with whiteness. Wang, who was former Speaker of the Yale Political Union (YPU), explains that the YPU board “struggled with seeing me as the only woman of color,” often talking to her as if she were a member of the white majority. For students like Wang, the AACC provides a space where the Asian American experience isn’t grouped in with white experience.

Tina Lu, Head of Pauli Murray College, who resides on the Advisory Board of the AACC, notes that the AACC is extremely interconnected with the other campus cultural groups. “The AACC has always been super clear about how it is part of a social world involving other cultural centers, that it is one of many,” she states, reflecting back on the history of Asian Americans at Yale in conjunction with other minority groups.

With the recent affirmative action complaints levied against Yale and Harvard, the original core values of AASA in comparison with today’s manifestation of the AACC and Asian Americans at Yale come under closer scrutiny. Min and Wang both indicate there are some Asian Americans who stand in opposition to affirmative action and the benefits it may give to other minorities. Professor Daniel HoSang, Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, states that there is still widespread support amongst Asian American college students for programs that promote diversity and equality. “The first generation of Asian American Yale students of the 1960s and ’70s were very, very clear that their interests were fully aligned with other students of color,” HoSang explains. “But, of course, any time that groups grow bigger or become diverse — as the Asian American population at Yale has become, there’s going to be ideological and political disagreements.”

The AACC has grown a lot since 1969, when Civil Rights issues dominated the national dialogue and only a few years after the immigration ban was lifted, yet it still retains some essence of its original activist and intercultural origins. “We are in a moment of American politics where everything is at the surface,” says Lu, in reference to racial minorities in America. “All these conversations are coming together in very active ways.”

Even as new types of discrimination, stereotypes, and policies arise, the AACC and AASA continually aim to remain active, heard, and conscious.


The Center Will Hold was originally published in The Yale Herald on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

***

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The Center Will Hold

Source: http://blog.yalebooks.com/2017/02/14/asian-migration-and-the-history-of-now/

The history of Asian Americans and their activism at Yale

On a Wednesday morning, the words “Department of Justice,” “discrimination,” and “Asian-American applicants” appeared in a Yale campus-wide email by President Peter Salovey. Like Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) v. Harvard, a case which first rankled the country a year ago, the position of Asian Americans as a model minority separate from other minorities came into question once again. In the email, Salovey defends Yale’s commitment to diversity. He cites an increase in the percentage of Asian Americans in the Class of 2022, from less than 14 percent fifteen years ago to 21.7 percent today.

In 1854, Yung Wing — the first Asian Yale student — attended Yale as an international student from China, long before Asians had become culturally set apart from other minorities in national discourse. He was also the first Chinese person to graduate from a U.S. college. In fact, Wing was an active member on campus, a member of DKE and Brothers in Unity, a literary society. He later organized the Chinese Educational Mission, which sent Chinese students to study abroad in the United States; however, his U.S citizenship was later revoked due to anti-Chinese immigration laws. At this time in the United States, Asians and Asian Americans, like other racial minorities, faced unjust de jure discrimination by the federal government that separated them from white Americans.

Rockwell “Rocky” Chin, GRD ’71, who currently serves as Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity & Diversity at the New York State Division of Human Rights, participated in forming the Asian American Students Association (AASA) while he was a student at Yale. Chin’s family history at Yale extends through much of the 20th century. “Our history goes back to Yung Wing,” he begins, “but since then the position of Asian Americans has grown through time.” In fact, Chin comes from a lineage of Yalies: his grandfather graduated Yale in 1908 and his father, Rockwood Q.P. Chin, graduated in the 1930s. Chin explains in an email, “my own curiosity [about this time period] comes from the fact that my American-born father attended Yale [when] there were only a handful of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders then!”

Yale’s current makeup differs dramatically from its historical reputation as an old boys’ club. Once upon a time, white Protestant males from upper class American families overwhelmed the ranks of each class. As Jasmine Zhuang, GH ’13, aptly describes in the Yale Historical Review, diversity meant only that there was a “small proportion of students who attended public schools.” Facing fierce backlash from alumni, Yale President Kingman Brewster, Jr., implemented initiatives in Yale’s admissions processes to increase the school’s diversity. Minority student populations started to grow.

In 1969, the Asian American Students Association — now called the Asian American Students Alliance — was established as the first iteration of an Asian American Yale student group. Later, in 1981, the Asian American Cultural Center (AACC), one of the four current cultural houses, was established.

Though Chin only attended Yale for two years, from 1969 to 1971, it was “the first time there was critical mass of Asian Pacific Americans at Yale,” which included Don Nakanishi, SY ’71, who was one of the leaders of the formation of AASA in 1969. Although there was a larger Asian American population than ever before, Nakanishi still describes the amount of Asian Americans as a “drop in the bucket” when he attended the school, with exactly 59 Asians at Yale College.

In Chin’s time, there were no Asian American studies courses and no Asian American student groups. Yale had just begun to admit women, and the United States had just begun implementing affirmative action. “We all worked very closely with the Chicano and the Black students.” Chin explains, “At Yale, we all felt we were a kind of minority. We felt somewhat isolated, except when we were together. There were a lot of common issues: ethnic studies, how the University did not relate to the Black communities that worked in New Haven, etc.”

Today’s Yale echoes similar underpinnings of solidarity. Like many of its peer institutions, Yale has grown in diversity. In recent discourse, however, Asian American-ness has been grouped with whiteness and pushed away from other communities of color. In fact, in the Yale Daily News’ staff-written piece, “Our diversity problem,” published on Oct. 29, the News Desk added an editor’s note to reassure that “in pointing out that East Asians are well represented in our Managing Board, [they] did not intend to dismiss the discrimination that East Asians face in accessing top leadership in institutions like the News, or to make the point that they are proximal to whiteness.”

The ongoing debate about Asian discrimination through affirmative action rests on the “model minority” myth — a term first coined in 1966 in The New York Times Magazine by sociologist William Petersen. The “model minority” myth describes the perceived phenomena of a minority achieving higher socioeconomic success than the population average. It has changed the dialogue of Asian Americans in the United States in the context of American race issues. However, the AACC and many — but not all — Asian Americans at Yale still support affirmative action and stand in solidarity with other minorities.

In an official statement, Joliana Yee, Director of the AACC, expresses hope that students “will come to see how a race-conscious, whole-person approach to admissions is necessary to strengthening our communities of learning and a step in the right direction for improving access, equity and inclusion in higher education.” This support for affirmative action is echoed among many Asians on campus.

Kathy Min, BR ’21, an Asian American student at Yale, feels that solidarity among people of color is important and still abundant at Yale. “We’re at a pretty political campus, and many are quite politically conscious,” Min explains. She adds, however, that both solidarity and division have arisen within Asian Americans and other racial minorities on campus. “A lot of Asian Americans are against affirmative action; they have very misplaced anger that it is hurting them,” she notes. The notion that some Asian Americans stand against affirmative action, and thus, other minorities, is addressed in Yee’s email as she tries to dispel the idea that affirmative action’s perceived negatives outweigh its positives.

The AACC still serves as a space for Asian Americans that recognizes the possible difficulties of being a racial minority at Yale. However, the “model minority” myth and public perception of Asian American positionality has contributed to a certain reputation of compliance. Rita Wang, MC ’19, a first-year counselor and former AACC peer liaison, however, notes that she has discussed discrimination with her first-years in the form of microaggressions and stereotypes. “I grew up with the stereotype that Asian Americans were politically inactive and compliant,” Wang notes, “so I was really interested in pushing that notion.” As a peer liaison at the AACC, Wang has noted that it is unfair to say that the AACC is “less activist.”

Reflecting on the AACC, Chin says, “It was a concession by Yale, I think, to address some of the requests and demands of the Asian American students. It did not exist when I was there.” In 1972, AASA was given a one-room office in the basement of Durfee. Four years later in 1977, the East Coast Asian American Student Union founded a Yale chapter, and in 1981, the AACC was established.

AASA is rooted in a history of activism. The creators of AASA advocated for the first Asian American Studies class at Yale, eventually titled “The Asian American Experience,” and in 1971 founded the Amerasia Journal, an Asian American newsletter that is now a premier academic publication in Asian American Studies.

However, even in 1969, Asian Americans came up against the notion that they did not face true discrimination compared to other racial minorities. In fact, in a 1969 statement to the Yale Daily News, Peter M.C. Choy, YC ’69, LAW ’72, explains that one of the most difficult stereotypes that AASA needed to overcome was “that Asian Americans are perfectly assimilated and face no discrimination in American society.” Brewster echoes that statement in a memorandum of the same year that even among those most politically conscious, there is the misconception that “what problems they may have are qualitatively and quantitatively minor.”

Still, this American era was politically charged. It was a time of protests, activism, and Civil Rights conflict. Chin and Nakanishi’s generation became involved in the student movement and the anti-war movement. “By the time I entered Yale, my eyes had been opened to the importance and problems regarding [the] lack of racial diversity, and how student mobilization could work,” Chin explains.

The Asian American Studies course was another example of student involvement. While many Asian American students had actively participated in on-campus political actions through other on-campus minority groups, they felt that academic inclusion was necessary to address the Asian American community’s unique problems and history. Professor Chitoshi Yanaga taught “The Asian American Experience,” but described the course’s creation as a student effort. Choy explains in his 1969 statement that Asian Americans at Yale hoped that the material addressed in the class would challenge the notion that Asian Americans faced little discrimination.

Some Asian American students report that in extracurricular settings, Asian American-ness is unintentionally lumped together with whiteness. Wang, who was former Speaker of the Yale Political Union (YPU), explains that the YPU board “struggled with seeing me as the only woman of color,” often talking to her as if she were a member of the white majority. For students like Wang, the AACC provides a space where the Asian American experience isn’t grouped in with white experience.

Tina Lu, Head of Pauli Murray College, who resides on the Advisory Board of the AACC, notes that the AACC is extremely interconnected with the other campus cultural groups. “The AACC has always been super clear about how it is part of a social world involving other cultural centers, that it is one of many,” she states, reflecting back on the history of Asian Americans at Yale in conjunction with other minority groups.

With the recent affirmative action complaints levied against Yale and Harvard, the original core values of AASA in comparison with today’s manifestation of the AACC and Asian Americans at Yale come under closer scrutiny. Min and Wang both indicate there are some Asian Americans who stand in opposition to affirmative action and the benefits it may give to other minorities. Professor Daniel HoSang, Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, states that there is still widespread support amongst Asian American college students for programs that promote diversity and equality. “The first generation of Asian American Yale students of the 1960s and ’70s were very, very clear that their interests were fully aligned with other students of color,” HoSang explains. “But, of course, any time that groups grow bigger or become diverse — as the Asian American population at Yale has become, there’s going to be ideological and political disagreements.”

The AACC has grown a lot since 1969, when Civil Rights issues dominated the national dialogue and only a few years after the immigration ban was lifted, yet it still retains some essence of its original activist and intercultural origins. “We are in a moment of American politics where everything is at the surface,” says Lu, in reference to racial minorities in America. “All these conversations are coming together in very active ways.”

Even as new types of discrimination, stereotypes, and policies arise, the AACC and AASA continually aim to remain active, heard, and conscious.


The Center Will Hold was originally published in The Yale Herald on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Wildcats snap Racer win streak, send Racers home

Story by Maggiann Ackerman

Staff writer

mackerman@murraystate.edu

Murray State volleyball’s 16-game winning streak was finally snapped when it mattered most on Friday, Nov. 30, as the Racers lost 25-18, 25-17, and 25-19 to the University of Kentucky in the opening round of the NCAA tournament.

Despite the sweep, Murray State was able to temper the Wildcats’ explosive offense for most of the game, controlling momentum early.

The Racers were able to claim the first point of set one with a kill by Murray State senior middle blocker Dacia Brown, assisted by Murray State sophomore setter Ashley McBee.

The Wildcats were quick to respond by taking an early 9-5 lead following kills by Kentucky junior right side hitter Caitlyn Cooper and junior outside hitter Leah Edmond.

Murray State junior outside hitter Rachel Giustino was able to close the gap and make it a one-point game at 10-9 after a kill.

Giustino caught fire offensively to help the Racers hang with UK, but a kill by Edmond made the score 18-15 in the Wildcats favor.

After several errors were committed by Murray State, the first set concluded 25-18.

The second set was close in the early stages with the score tied at four thanks to kills by Murray State junior right side hitter Rachel Holthaus, Murray State freshman middle blocker Kolby McClelland and kills by UK sophomore middle blocker Kendyl Paris and Edmond.

The Racers were then able to take the lead 7-5 with a kill by Giustino and a service error by Cooper.

The Wildcats would tie the score once again at eight, but a kill by Brown put Murray State up 9-8 over Kentucky.

The Racers held the lead 12-11 following a service error by Kentucky sophomore setter Madison Lilley, but the Wildcats came back and took the lead 14-13 after a kill by UK freshman outside hitter Alli Stumler.

Murray State sophomore middle blocker Katirah Johnson and Brown provided kills for the Racers in hopes of keeping their dreams of claiming a set alive.

However, the strong Wildcat offense advanced the lead 23-16 after kills by University of Kentucky senior middle blocker Brooke Morgan and Edmond.

The set concluded with a kill by University of Kentucky freshmen outside hitter Alli Stumler to make the score 25-17.

To begin the third set, Murray State was able to take a 4-1 lead made possible by a pair of service aces executed by Murray State sophomore setter Callie Anderton, a kill from Brown and an error committed by UK.

Both teams were neck-and-neck as they tied the score at six points, seven, eight, nine and 10, due to kills by Holthaus, Giustino, Cooper, and Morgan.

That would be one of the few times the Racers were close to taking the lead again in the set, as a service ace by University of Kentucky sophomore libero Gabby Curry, kill by Stumler, and errors made by Murray State advanced the lead 20-15.

Giustino and Brown remained aggressive at the net to attempt to shorten the 22-17 lead, but a service ace by University of Kentucky senior libero and outside hitter Merideth Jewell along with a kill by Lilley made the score 24-18.

Edmond delivered the final blow to the Racers with a kill to take the third and final set 25-19.

Following the game UK head coach Craig Skinner applauded the effort by the Racer volleyball team, crediting their unique system that emphasizes players setting the ball higher in the air for making the game a challenge.

“From the first time we started watching Murray State to the end of this match, I just have a lot of respect for how hard [Murray State] played this game,” Skinner said. “They have a system that is very difficult to play against.”

Murray State volleyball Head Coach David Schwepker boasted about his team effort in the NCAA tournament game.

“Going into playing against Kentucky we talked about how our athletes just had to go for it and don’t back down,” Schwepker said. “That was our only chance of going up against Kentucky and I think our girls did that. Kentucky is a great team so I’m not upset about that; I think our girls did wonderful.”

Some accomplishments amassed by Murray State this season were Becca Fernandez being named OVC defensive player of the year leading conference in 5.89 digs per set and being fourth player in school history to earn this award.

Fernandez was also named All-OVC first team along with Dacia Brown and Rachel Giustino. Rachel Holthaus was named All-OVC second team in addition.

Murray State concluded its season with a 22-10 record overall and 13-3 record in conference play.

 

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Wildcats snap Racer win streak, send Racers home

Story by Maggiann Ackerman

Staff writer

mackerman@murraystate.edu

Murray State volleyball’s 16-game winning streak was finally snapped when it mattered most on Friday, Nov. 30, as the Racers lost 25-18, 25-17, and 25-19 to the University of Kentucky in the opening round of the NCAA tournament.

Despite the sweep, Murray State was able to temper the Wildcats’ explosive offense for most of the game, controlling momentum early.

The Racers were able to claim the first point of set one with a kill by Murray State senior middle blocker Dacia Brown, assisted by Murray State sophomore setter Ashley McBee.

The Wildcats were quick to respond by taking an early 9-5 lead following kills by Kentucky junior right side hitter Caitlyn Cooper and junior outside hitter Leah Edmond.

Murray State junior outside hitter Rachel Giustino was able to close the gap and make it a one-point game at 10-9 after a kill.

Giustino caught fire offensively to help the Racers hang with UK, but a kill by Edmond made the score 18-15 in the Wildcats favor.

After several errors were committed by Murray State, the first set concluded 25-18.

The second set was close in the early stages with the score tied at four thanks to kills by Murray State junior right side hitter Rachel Holthaus, Murray State freshman middle blocker Kolby McClelland and kills by UK sophomore middle blocker Kendyl Paris and Edmond.

The Racers were then able to take the lead 7-5 with a kill by Giustino and a service error by Cooper.

The Wildcats would tie the score once again at eight, but a kill by Brown put Murray State up 9-8 over Kentucky.

The Racers held the lead 12-11 following a service error by Kentucky sophomore setter Madison Lilley, but the Wildcats came back and took the lead 14-13 after a kill by UK freshman outside hitter Alli Stumler.

Murray State sophomore middle blocker Katirah Johnson and Brown provided kills for the Racers in hopes of keeping their dreams of claiming a set alive.

However, the strong Wildcat offense advanced the lead 23-16 after kills by University of Kentucky senior middle blocker Brooke Morgan and Edmond.

The set concluded with a kill by University of Kentucky freshmen outside hitter Alli Stumler to make the score 25-17.

To begin the third set, Murray State was able to take a 4-1 lead made possible by a pair of service aces executed by Murray State sophomore setter Callie Anderton, a kill from Brown and an error committed by UK.

Both teams were neck-and-neck as they tied the score at six points, seven, eight, nine and 10, due to kills by Holthaus, Giustino, Cooper, and Morgan.

That would be one of the few times the Racers were close to taking the lead again in the set, as a service ace by University of Kentucky sophomore libero Gabby Curry, kill by Stumler, and errors made by Murray State advanced the lead 20-15.

Giustino and Brown remained aggressive at the net to attempt to shorten the 22-17 lead, but a service ace by University of Kentucky senior libero and outside hitter Merideth Jewell along with a kill by Lilley made the score 24-18.

Edmond delivered the final blow to the Racers with a kill to take the third and final set 25-19.

Following the game UK head coach Craig Skinner applauded the effort by the Racer volleyball team, crediting their unique system that emphasizes players setting the ball higher in the air for making the game a challenge.

“From the first time we started watching Murray State to the end of this match, I just have a lot of respect for how hard [Murray State] played this game,” Skinner said. “They have a system that is very difficult to play against.”

Murray State volleyball Head Coach David Schwepker boasted about his team effort in the NCAA tournament game.

“Going into playing against Kentucky we talked about how our athletes just had to go for it and don’t back down,” Schwepker said. “That was our only chance of going up against Kentucky and I think our girls did that. Kentucky is a great team so I’m not upset about that; I think our girls did wonderful.”

Some accomplishments amassed by Murray State this season were Becca Fernandez being named OVC defensive player of the year leading conference in 5.89 digs per set and being fourth player in school history to earn this award.

Fernandez was also named All-OVC first team along with Dacia Brown and Rachel Giustino. Rachel Holthaus was named All-OVC second team in addition.

Murray State concluded its season with a 22-10 record overall and 13-3 record in conference play.

 

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Review: New Amazon show “Homecoming” doesn’t quite find its stride

Warning: This review contains spoilers for the first season of “Homecoming” on Amazon Prime.

Based on a podcast of the same name, Amazon’s “Homecoming” revolves around soldiers with symptoms of PTSD coming to a treatment facility to work through their trauma. Or, that’s what they think. The facility they enter is actually drugging them with an experimental memory inhibitor, and their goal is to get rid of the traumatic memories and redeploy the soldiers, who don’t necessarily want to be sent back to the field.

The soldier that the viewer follows is named Walter Cruz, played by Stephan James. Cruz has a specific traumatic memory that is targeted in his sessions. Eventually, he forgets about his trauma and is told he will be redeployed, even though he explicitly stated earlier in the show that he didn’t want to go back overseas.

My question is: why did he agree? The traumatic memory was gone, yes, but just because you don’t have specific trauma doesn’t mean you will suddenly be willing to go back to active duty. Cruz thought he was on the path to becoming a civilian, and there was almost no indication that he was even upset that he was being redeployed.

As a viewer, it was very frustrating to only see Cruz in his counseling sessions, though I understand why the show did it. The podcast version of the show was presented as the recordings of Cruz’s sessions, as well as a few other mediums every now and then as needed. This format works well for a podcast, but once you add a visual element, you are better able to notice the missing pieces in Cruz’s story.

Podcasts will regularly omit superfluous details since additional information could make the piece muddy and confusing. However, since the show is now in a video format, the creators were able to add extra details to assist with worldbuilding and character background. However, some of the choices they made didn’t really add anything to the show.

One specific incident that comes to mind is a moment where a character barges into his boss’s unlocked office while she is breastfeeding her child, and her breast is completely visible to the viewer. Why did the creators feel the need to include that moment in the show? I suspect it was for shock value, since the child was never mentioned again. I was definitely not expecting to see anything like that, that’s for sure.

Regarding the technical side of the show, I was underwhelmed and often confused when it came to the creative choices. The score of the show rarely fit the mood of the scene, and the camera work felt cheesy and artificial. It came across as though the director was trying especially hard to be edgy and artistic, but it was just too much.

Overall, I didn’t hate the show, but there were times where I felt I could definitely be doing something more enjoyable or productive with my energy.

Final Score: 3/5

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Men’s Hoops Kicks off Conference Play Saturday

The Pioneers kick off conference play against Bluffton on Saturday at the Beck Center. The Pioneers look to start strong in front of their home Lexington crowd to kick off the month of December.

Transy has been off to an up and down start kicking off the season at 2-3 not counting their exhibition game against Kentucky. They are coming off a visit to Pittsburgh in the Carnegie Mellon DoubleTree Invitational last weekend, in which they went 1-1.

In the invitational up in Pittsburgh, the Pioneers faced ninth-ranked Hamilton College. This game was a ended in a close 73-63 defeat for the Pioneers. The shining light in the loss was first-year center Luke Schroeder who had a double-double with 19 points and 13 rebounds.

The following game Transy played took place the very next day where they faced off against Frostburg State. Transylvania was 1-3 going into this game on the losing end of three straight games to Centre, Emory-Henry, and Hamilton after winning their season opener against Mount Union.

Transy was able to defeat Frostburg St. to the tune of 82-71. This was the best offensive performance from the Pioneers all season. They shot an impressive 49% from the field and found the offensive efficiency that they are capable of producing. The scoring in this game was led by sophomore Devin Twenty who dropped 14 points to go along with three assists in his first start of the season. He has served, at times, primary bench scorer by also having a strong game against Centre with 18 points in that game.

Transy looks to carry their well balanced offensive attack on to the Bluffton Beavers who have had an impressive 4-1 start to their season with four straight victories with two high scoring, close wins against Heidelberg and Kalamazoo. Both teams have yet to play a conference game prior to their meeting on Saturday.

Last season, the Pioneers found success against the Beavers, beating them both times they faced each other. Transy won by double digits both times and looks to repeat those performances in Lexington.

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New mobile printing kiosks to replace Morgan’s current system

Morgan’s Campus is going through several renovations and new printing kiosks will appear as early as the spring semester of 2019 in place of the current printing system, papercut.

The Wēpa printing company will install the kiosks at strategic locations throughout campus in efforts to make printing more accessible for students and cut-down on university paper use, according to Division of Information Technology (DIT) officials.

Currently, each student is allotted $25 per semester to print with the cost of 10 cents per page. Students will be given a significantly lower allowance of $5 towards Wēpa printing. After the $5 runs out, students will be responsible for financing their own printing via the Wēpa printing app, according to Mendoza-Robinson.

“We have been keeping track of student printing volume, how much is being spent on paper, toner printer maintenance, replacement printers…the Wēpa solution is much more cost effective for the University and provides that convenience factor for students,” she said.

According to Gupta, printing is cheaper for students who download the app and use their campus cards to print.

“It’s like 10 cents per page…say you don’t have money loaded on the [campus card] and you just want to use your debit card, it’s 60 cents flat.”

Students and teachers will be encouraged to use blackboard and electronic submission in order to ease the transition, said Mendoza-Robinson.

The anticipated partnership was inspired by a meeting between the Morgan State and Towson University DIT teams.  

Cynthia Mendoza-Robinson, Deputy CIO of Operations for DIT, recalled the day when the idea popped into her head.  

“Last summer we met with the IT staff at Towson University for a completely different meeting and while sitting in one of the labs I noticed there was no printer in the lab, so I asked them ‘how do your students print’,” said Mendoza-Robinson. “They take us outside of the lab and we see this kiosk and we were intrigued.”

Her curiosity kick-started Morgan’s transition to a new system. DIT met with President David Wilson, the University Council and discussed the impending changes with members of the Student Government Association (SGA) via conference call over the summer.

According to SGA President, Kenold Pierre, they all agreed that Wēpa printing could be mutually beneficial for the university and its students.

“It will help with accessibility and is also something innovative,” said Pierre. “I know this will work and I would say [students] should give it a try…with change, people try to reject it.”

College students state-wide have been embracing the change and Wēpa is revolutionizing printing on campuses including University of Maryland (UMD) College Park, Towson University and the University of Baltimore County.

Students from UMD are already reaping the benefits of the kiosk printing system. Rhea Gupta, a sophomore public health science major, said that they are more convenient for students who do not own their own printers.

“I’d just find a random building on my way to class and it would take two minutes [to print],” said Gupta.  

According to Mendoza-Robinson, this is the change that Morgan’s students have been asking for.  

“I think the printing process is fine but there could be more printers around campus and color printing,” said Jonathan Mitchell, sophomore business administration major. “Last year when I was in Rawlings, I wished that there was somewhere I could go to just easily print in Rawlings.”

Similar to other college campuses, the goal is to place a kiosk in every academic building and possibly if students receive the new devices well, kiosks will appear in residence halls.

“They are everywhere,” said Gupta. “Basically, in almost every academic building. Actually, I have one in my apartment as well.” Gupta lives in an off-campus, UMD owned, apartment complex.

Increased convenience comes at a cost, and Morgan students are wondering what the cost of these new devices will be.

Lamonte Summers, Assistant Professor of Media Law and Ethics in the School of Global Journalism and Communications and member of the University Council, stated that this is the first step for Morgan towards being a completely paperless campus.

“Printing is very expensive. I think students don’t understand that because when a student has a paper that’s due they might print off various drafts or various versions of it and it’s costly,” said Summers. “I’m old-school, I like hard copy because it’s easier on the eyes. I’m tactile when it comes to grading papers I want to actually have the thing in my hand. I know I’m probably becoming more and more of a dinosaur when it comes to demanding and requiring hard copies.”

Although he is hesitant, Summers believes that if teachers take electronic submissions, the students will have no choice but to adapt.

“If [professors] adapt quickly and emphasize to our students that when you submit work, it’s going to be done electronically then I guess that drop—going from $25 to $5—may not seem as impactful because students won’t be printing if all of their instructors are requiring students to submit on Blackboard,” he said.

DIT will begin setting up the kiosks at their designated locations around campus over winter break; students taking classes over the winter mini-semester will get a sneak peek at the new devices.  

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New mobile printing kiosks to replace Morgan’s current system

Morgan’s Campus is going through several renovations and new printing kiosks will appear as early as the spring semester of 2019 in place of the current printing system, papercut.

The Wēpa printing company will install the kiosks at strategic locations throughout campus in efforts to make printing more accessible for students and cut-down on university paper use, according to Division of Information Technology (DIT) officials.

Currently, each student is allotted $25 per semester to print with the cost of 10 cents per page. Students will be given a significantly lower allowance of $5 towards Wēpa printing. After the $5 runs out, students will be responsible for financing their own printing via the Wēpa printing app, according to Mendoza-Robinson.

“We have been keeping track of student printing volume, how much is being spent on paper, toner printer maintenance, replacement printers…the Wēpa solution is much more cost effective for the University and provides that convenience factor for students,” she said.

According to Gupta, printing is cheaper for students who download the app and use their campus cards to print.

“It’s like 10 cents per page…say you don’t have money loaded on the [campus card] and you just want to use your debit card, it’s 60 cents flat.”

Students and teachers will be encouraged to use blackboard and electronic submission in order to ease the transition, said Mendoza-Robinson.

The anticipated partnership was inspired by a meeting between the Morgan State and Towson University DIT teams.  

Cynthia Mendoza-Robinson, Deputy CIO of Operations for DIT, recalled the day when the idea popped into her head.  

“Last summer we met with the IT staff at Towson University for a completely different meeting and while sitting in one of the labs I noticed there was no printer in the lab, so I asked them ‘how do your students print’,” said Mendoza-Robinson. “They take us outside of the lab and we see this kiosk and we were intrigued.”

Her curiosity kick-started Morgan’s transition to a new system. DIT met with President David Wilson, the University Council and discussed the impending changes with members of the Student Government Association (SGA) via conference call over the summer.

According to SGA President, Kenold Pierre, they all agreed that Wēpa printing could be mutually beneficial for the university and its students.

“It will help with accessibility and is also something innovative,” said Pierre. “I know this will work and I would say [students] should give it a try…with change, people try to reject it.”

College students state-wide have been embracing the change and Wēpa is revolutionizing printing on campuses including University of Maryland (UMD) College Park, Towson University and the University of Baltimore County.

Students from UMD are already reaping the benefits of the kiosk printing system. Rhea Gupta, a sophomore public health science major, said that they are more convenient for students who do not own their own printers.

“I’d just find a random building on my way to class and it would take two minutes [to print],” said Gupta.  

According to Mendoza-Robinson, this is the change that Morgan’s students have been asking for.  

“I think the printing process is fine but there could be more printers around campus and color printing,” said Jonathan Mitchell, sophomore business administration major. “Last year when I was in Rawlings, I wished that there was somewhere I could go to just easily print in Rawlings.”

Similar to other college campuses, the goal is to place a kiosk in every academic building and possibly if students receive the new devices well, kiosks will appear in residence halls.

“They are everywhere,” said Gupta. “Basically, in almost every academic building. Actually, I have one in my apartment as well.” Gupta lives in an off-campus, UMD owned, apartment complex.

Increased convenience comes at a cost, and Morgan students are wondering what the cost of these new devices will be.

Lamonte Summers, Assistant Professor of Media Law and Ethics in the School of Global Journalism and Communications and member of the University Council, stated that this is the first step for Morgan towards being a completely paperless campus.

“Printing is very expensive. I think students don’t understand that because when a student has a paper that’s due they might print off various drafts or various versions of it and it’s costly,” said Summers. “I’m old-school, I like hard copy because it’s easier on the eyes. I’m tactile when it comes to grading papers I want to actually have the thing in my hand. I know I’m probably becoming more and more of a dinosaur when it comes to demanding and requiring hard copies.”

Although he is hesitant, Summers believes that if teachers take electronic submissions, the students will have no choice but to adapt.

“If [professors] adapt quickly and emphasize to our students that when you submit work, it’s going to be done electronically then I guess that drop—going from $25 to $5—may not seem as impactful because students won’t be printing if all of their instructors are requiring students to submit on Blackboard,” he said.

DIT will begin setting up the kiosks at their designated locations around campus over winter break; students taking classes over the winter mini-semester will get a sneak peek at the new devices.  

***

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New mobile printing kiosks to replace Morgan’s current system

Morgan’s Campus is going through several renovations and new printing kiosks will appear as early as the spring semester of 2019 in place of the current printing system, papercut.

The Wēpa printing company will install the kiosks at strategic locations throughout campus in efforts to make printing more accessible for students and cut-down on university paper use, according to Division of Information Technology (DIT) officials.

Currently, each student is allotted $25 per semester to print with the cost of 10 cents per page. Students will be given a significantly lower allowance of $5 towards Wēpa printing. After the $5 runs out, students will be responsible for financing their own printing via the Wēpa printing app, according to Mendoza-Robinson.

“We have been keeping track of student printing volume, how much is being spent on paper, toner printer maintenance, replacement printers…the Wēpa solution is much more cost effective for the University and provides that convenience factor for students,” she said.

According to Gupta, printing is cheaper for students who download the app and use their campus cards to print.

“It’s like 10 cents per page…say you don’t have money loaded on the [campus card] and you just want to use your debit card, it’s 60 cents flat.”

Students and teachers will be encouraged to use blackboard and electronic submission in order to ease the transition, said Mendoza-Robinson.

The anticipated partnership was inspired by a meeting between the Morgan State and Towson University DIT teams.  

Cynthia Mendoza-Robinson, Deputy CIO of Operations for DIT, recalled the day when the idea popped into her head.  

“Last summer we met with the IT staff at Towson University for a completely different meeting and while sitting in one of the labs I noticed there was no printer in the lab, so I asked them ‘how do your students print’,” said Mendoza-Robinson. “They take us outside of the lab and we see this kiosk and we were intrigued.”

Her curiosity kick-started Morgan’s transition to a new system. DIT met with President David Wilson, the University Council and discussed the impending changes with members of the Student Government Association (SGA) via conference call over the summer.

According to SGA President, Kenold Pierre, they all agreed that Wēpa printing could be mutually beneficial for the university and its students.

“It will help with accessibility and is also something innovative,” said Pierre. “I know this will work and I would say [students] should give it a try…with change, people try to reject it.”

College students state-wide have been embracing the change and Wēpa is revolutionizing printing on campuses including University of Maryland (UMD) College Park, Towson University and the University of Baltimore County.

Students from UMD are already reaping the benefits of the kiosk printing system. Rhea Gupta, a sophomore public health science major, said that they are more convenient for students who do not own their own printers.

“I’d just find a random building on my way to class and it would take two minutes [to print],” said Gupta.  

According to Mendoza-Robinson, this is the change that Morgan’s students have been asking for.  

“I think the printing process is fine but there could be more printers around campus and color printing,” said Jonathan Mitchell, sophomore business administration major. “Last year when I was in Rawlings, I wished that there was somewhere I could go to just easily print in Rawlings.”

Similar to other college campuses, the goal is to place a kiosk in every academic building and possibly if students receive the new devices well, kiosks will appear in residence halls.

“They are everywhere,” said Gupta. “Basically, in almost every academic building. Actually, I have one in my apartment as well.” Gupta lives in an off-campus, UMD owned, apartment complex.

Increased convenience comes at a cost, and Morgan students are wondering what the cost of these new devices will be.

Lamonte Summers, Assistant Professor of Media Law and Ethics in the School of Global Journalism and Communications and member of the University Council, stated that this is the first step for Morgan towards being a completely paperless campus.

“Printing is very expensive. I think students don’t understand that because when a student has a paper that’s due they might print off various drafts or various versions of it and it’s costly,” said Summers. “I’m old-school, I like hard copy because it’s easier on the eyes. I’m tactile when it comes to grading papers I want to actually have the thing in my hand. I know I’m probably becoming more and more of a dinosaur when it comes to demanding and requiring hard copies.”

Although he is hesitant, Summers believes that if teachers take electronic submissions, the students will have no choice but to adapt.

“If [professors] adapt quickly and emphasize to our students that when you submit work, it’s going to be done electronically then I guess that drop—going from $25 to $5—may not seem as impactful because students won’t be printing if all of their instructors are requiring students to submit on Blackboard,” he said.

DIT will begin setting up the kiosks at their designated locations around campus over winter break; students taking classes over the winter mini-semester will get a sneak peek at the new devices.  

***

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Carolyn Bourdeaux, AYSPS professor, concedes congressional race

Carolyn Bourdeaux, Democratic candidate and Georgia State professor, conceded to Republican incumbent Rob Woodall on Nov. 21 following a neck-and-neck battle for Georgia’s 7th Congressional District. Bourdeaux lost by just 0.14 percent out of nearly 300,000 votes.

Days after the Tuesday, Nov. 6 election, the race was still too close to call. The race came to a close after a recount was issued at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 21, following the announcement of a difference of only 419 votes between the two candidates.

According to a Georgia secretary of state-affiliated website, Rob Woodall netted 50.07 percent of the vote, though that amount is slightly higher now due to him picking up 13 votes in the Forsyth and Gwinnett recounts.

“I am grateful to every person who supported me along this journey. While we didn’t get the outcome we had hoped for in this election, we achieved an incredible amount,” Bourdeaux said in her official concession speech.

For a first-time candidate, Bourdeaux came incredibly close to unseating Woodall. In the four previous congressional races, Woodall never dipped below 60.38 percent of the vote. Bourdeaux also received significantly more votes than any other Democratic opponent to Woodall in the past four elections.

Perhaps Bourdeaux’s success can be partially attributed to several high-profile endorsements, including former President Barack Obama, Georgia Congressman John Lewis and former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams.

Woodall now returns to his position as the 7th district’s representative, entering his fifth term.

When the recount was called, Woodall’s campaign issued a response regarding their expectations of the recount.

“The process provides a recount option for races within a 1% margin and the Woodall campaign always expected that Mrs. Bourdeaux would request a recount, so this next phase does not come as a surprise and certainly is not alarming,” the release stated. “As for now however, Rob Woodall has been certified the winner and he is back to work, serving the 7th district.”

Bourdeaux took a leave of absence from Georgia State to campaign against Woodall, though it’s unclear when she will return to teaching.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Carolyn Bourdeaux, AYSPS professor, concedes congressional race

Carolyn Bourdeaux, Democratic candidate and Georgia State professor, conceded to Republican incumbent Rob Woodall on Nov. 21 following a neck-and-neck battle for Georgia’s 7th Congressional District. Bourdeaux lost by just 0.14 percent out of nearly 300,000 votes.

Days after the Tuesday, Nov. 6 election, the race was still too close to call. The race came to a close after a recount was issued at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 21, following the announcement of a difference of only 419 votes between the two candidates.

According to a Georgia secretary of state-affiliated website, Rob Woodall netted 50.07 percent of the vote, though that amount is slightly higher now due to him picking up 13 votes in the Forsyth and Gwinnett recounts.

“I am grateful to every person who supported me along this journey. While we didn’t get the outcome we had hoped for in this election, we achieved an incredible amount,” Bourdeaux said in her official concession speech.

For a first-time candidate, Bourdeaux came incredibly close to unseating Woodall. In the four previous congressional races, Woodall never dipped below 60.38 percent of the vote. Bourdeaux also received significantly more votes than any other Democratic opponent to Woodall in the past four elections.

Perhaps Bourdeaux’s success can be partially attributed to several high-profile endorsements, including former President Barack Obama, Georgia Congressman John Lewis and former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams.

Woodall now returns to his position as the 7th district’s representative, entering his fifth term.

When the recount was called, Woodall’s campaign issued a response regarding their expectations of the recount.

“The process provides a recount option for races within a 1% margin and the Woodall campaign always expected that Mrs. Bourdeaux would request a recount, so this next phase does not come as a surprise and certainly is not alarming,” the release stated. “As for now however, Rob Woodall has been certified the winner and he is back to work, serving the 7th district.”

Bourdeaux took a leave of absence from Georgia State to campaign against Woodall, though it’s unclear when she will return to teaching.

***

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BV Football team says goodbye to nine key senior members

Almost ten months ago, Head Coach Grant Mollring set the new standard for Buena Vista University’s football program, “Win the IIAC.” With that, he also asked his nine to-be senior football players to step up and lead the team to their ultimate goal. 

Ten months later, the vision never became a reality for the graduating nine. However, their contributions to a growing program won’t be forgotten. 

The Buena Vista Football team held their Senior Day ceremonies on Saturday, Nov. 10, as they finished their season against the Simpson Storm. After a hard a hard fought loss, the senior Beavers hung up their jerseys for the last time in their collegiate careers. 

Cole Miller, Colton Preston, Marque Edwards, Quamaree Harris, Charlie Flickinger, Wesley Brennan, Matthew Yngve, Sean Joelson and Collin Demoreuille first came to BVU in the fall of 2015, in what seems like just months ago for them. 

From 110-yard sprints to team outings at La Juanita’s. Six in the morning lifting sessions to a Sunday reward swim at King’s Pointe waterpark. The grind of fall camp to All-Conference accolades. Heartbreaking losses to underdog wins. An overtime, walk-off two-point conversion against the Dutch on Hall of Fame Day. The nine have been reminiscent of the rollercoaster ride their four years have been.

Cole Miller, a record-setting quarterback for Buena Vista, finishes his career 2nd all-time at BV in passing touchdowns and total yards. He completed the season with a substantial 2,432 all-purpose yards as well and was appreciative to be recognized as one of the all-time BVU greats.  

“It feels really good. It’s kind of an honor to be in a group that successful,” says Miller. “It was a good season, statistically I guess, and it’s too bad we couldn’t get more wins but it was fun nonetheless.”

As co-captain of the team, both Miller and fellow co-captain Collin Demoreuille were honored to represent the team and set the squad’s high standards. 

“It’s something that I’ll always remember for sure. Senior year, record-wise, wasn’t what we wanted but we made a lot of great memories. Being able to be that leader and be that face was a great time. I was able to represent BVU the best way I could,” says Demoreuille. 

Though five of the seniors were starters on offense, none had a better connection than Miller and Flickinger. Growing up together and playing in high school, the duo developed a lasting friendship through football. 

Flickinger, a receiver for the Beavers, ended the year with two touchdowns and 227 yards. His ability to joke around with Miller, and also bring each other back to Earth at times, has proved beneficial. 

“I think we can tell what each other are thinking really well. There’s times that I can just go to a window because I know that’s where Cole is going to throw the ball. For however many years now that’s just the way it’s been,” says Flickinger. 

However, Joelson and Preston can also be seen laughing and having fun together as a pair all over campus. Preston, a four-year lineman for the Beavers and Joelson, the team’s newest addition in his senior year, proved a force to be reckoned with in the trenches. 

“As a family and friendship type of deal, we’ve all become a lot closer than I think any of us knew when we first came in,” says Preston. “I love all of these guys and I’d do anything for them.” 

“Cole, Colton, and Flick all convinced me to play football again. It was a tough process to get back in the athlete mind,” says Joelson. “But after that first one [game] things just started rolling for me.” 

One of the offense’s most versatile players, Matt Yngve, split reps this year at both the tight end and fullback positions. While having to know the playbook as much as anyone on the team, Yngve also relished his time in the weight room. 

“Other than just the gameday atmosphere, I think my favorite thing was always in the weight room, especially around max-out times. Being around the guys hooting and hollering getting behind you, hitting some heavy lifts and such, was always one of my favorite things to do here.” 

Brennan, Edwards, and Harris, the trio of defensive lineman dedicated to stopping anything opposing offenses threw at them, came from different walks of life. However, through their shared experiences and their love of the game, they developed an unbreakable bond. 

Brennan, an RA, football player, former president of an on-campus club, and All-Conference Academic recipient, had great advice for any aspiring collegiate athlete. 

“Stick it out. Be a part of a team. You came here for a reason,” says Brennan. He was also happy to share his personal highlight of his career. “I made a third-down stop in the Central game last year, late in the game. You know, we won that game on the very last play so it’s something cool to look back on.” 

Harris, a native of Las Vegas, hasn’t adjusted to the life of Iowa quite the way he expected. The cold weather in particular has come as a surprise to him, but he’s still made lasting memories at BV. 

“It was a first night game at college my freshman year. During the last play I stopped a touchdown at like the five-yard line,” says Harris, who was also named IIAC Defensive Player of the Week for his efforts that game. “It was great. I felt like a star.” 

Edwards, a physical powerhouse on the line for Buena Vista, took pride in his play and ability to move the offensive line. 

“Especially at nose guard there’s always bigger lineman that you’re going against, especially in this conference. Being physical in the trenches, especially as nose guard, is a big factor in that,” says Edwards. 

As the nine seniors look back on their time as Buena Vista University football players, there’s an air of melancholy. Reminiscing on both the positives and negatives will happen naturally, but the nine will never forget some of the best moments of their lives spent as a Beaver.  

***

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BV Football Team Says Goodbye to Nine Key Senior Members

Almost ten months ago, Head Coach Grant Mollring set the new standard for Buena Vista University’s football program, “Win the IIAC.” With that, he also asked his nine to-be senior football players to step up and lead the team to their ultimate goal. 

Ten months later, the vision never became a reality for the graduating nine. However, their contributions to a growing program won’t be forgotten. 

The Buena Vista Football team held their Senior Day ceremonies on Saturday, Nov. 10, as they finished their season against the Simpson Storm. After a hard a hard fought loss, the senior Beavers hung up their jerseys for the last time in their collegiate careers. 

Cole Miller, Colton Preston, Marque Edwards, Quamaree Harris, Charlie Flickinger, Wesley Brennan, Matthew Yngve, Sean Joelson and Collin Demoreuille first came to BVU in the fall of 2015, in what seems like just months ago for them. 

From 110-yard sprints to team outings at La Juanita’s. Six in the morning lifting sessions to a Sunday reward swim at King’s Pointe waterpark. The grind of fall camp to All-Conference accolades. Heartbreaking losses to underdog wins. An overtime, walk-off two-point conversion against the Dutch on Hall of Fame Day. The nine have been reminiscent of the rollercoaster ride their four years have been.

Cole Miller, a record-setting quarterback for Buena Vista, finishes his career 2nd all-time at BV in passing touchdowns and total yards. He completed the season with a substantial 2,432 all-purpose yards as well and was appreciative to be recognized as one of the all-time BVU greats.  

“It feels really good. It’s kind of an honor to be in a group that successful,” says Miller. “It was a good season, statistically I guess, and it’s too bad we couldn’t get more wins but it was fun nonetheless.”

As co-captain of the team, both Miller and fellow co-captain Collin Demoreuille were honored to represent the team and set the squad’s high standards. 

“It’s something that I’ll always remember for sure. Senior year, record-wise, wasn’t what we wanted but we made a lot of great memories. Being able to be that leader and be that face was a great time. I was able to represent BVU the best way I could,” says Demoreuille. 

Though five of the seniors were starters on offense, none had a better connection than Miller and Flickinger. Growing up together and playing in high school, the duo developed a lasting friendship through football. 

Flickinger, a receiver for the Beavers, ended the year with two touchdowns and 227 yards. His ability to joke around with Miller, and also bring each other back to Earth at times, has proved beneficial. 

“I think we can tell what each other are thinking really well. There’s times that I can just go to a window because I know that’s where Cole is going to throw the ball. For however many years now that’s just the way it’s been,” says Flickinger. 

However, Joelson and Preston can also be seen laughing and having fun together as a pair all over campus. Preston, a four-year lineman for the Beavers and Joelson, the team’s newest addition in his senior year, proved a force to be reckoned with in the trenches. 

“As a family and friendship type of deal, we’ve all become a lot closer than I think any of us knew when we first came in,” says Preston. “I love all of these guys and I’d do anything for them.” 

“Cole, Colton, and Flick all convinced me to play football again. It was a tough process to get back in the athlete mind,” says Joelson. “But after that first one [game] things just started rolling for me.” 

One of the offense’s most versatile players, Matt Yngve, split reps this year at both the tight end and fullback positions. While having to know the playbook as much as anyone on the team, Yngve also relished his time in the weight room. 

“Other than just the gameday atmosphere, I think my favorite thing was always in the weight room, especially around max-out times. Being around the guys hooting and hollering getting behind you, hitting some heavy lifts and such, was always one of my favorite things to do here.” 

Brennan, Edwards, and Harris, the trio of defensive lineman dedicated to stopping anything opposing offenses threw at them, came from different walks of life. However, through their shared experiences and their love of the game, they developed an unbreakable bond. 

Brennan, an RA, football player, former president of an on-campus club, and All-Conference Academic recipient, had great advice for any aspiring collegiate athlete. 

“Stick it out. Be a part of a team. You came here for a reason,” says Brennan. He was also happy to share his personal highlight of his career. “I made a third-down stop in the Central game last year, late in the game. You know, we won that game on the very last play so it’s something cool to look back on.” 

Harris, a native of Las Vegas, hasn’t adjusted to the life of Iowa quite the way he expected. The cold weather in particular has come as a surprise to him, but he’s still made lasting memories at BV. 

“It was a first night game at college my freshman year. During the last play I stopped a touchdown at like the five-yard line,” says Harris, who was also named IIAC Defensive Player of the Week for his efforts that game. “It was great. I felt like a star.” 

Edwards, a physical powerhouse on the line for Buena Vista, took pride in his play and ability to move the offensive line. 

“Especially at nose guard there’s always bigger lineman that you’re going against, especially in this conference. Being physical in the trenches, especially as nose guard, is a big factor in that,” says Edwards. 

As the nine seniors look back on their time as Buena Vista University football players, there’s an air of melancholy. Reminiscing on both the positives and negatives will happen naturally, but the nine will never forget some of the best moments of their lives spent as a Beaver.  

***

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The Center Will Hold

On a Wednesday morning, the words “Department of Justice,” “discrimination,” and “Asian-American applicants” appeared in a Yale campus-wide email by President Peter Salovey. Like Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) v. Harvard, a case which first rankled the country a year ago, the position of Asian Americans as a model minority separate from other minorities came into question once again. In the email, Salovey defends Yale’s commitment to diversity. He cites an increase in the percentage of Asian Americans in the Class of 2022, from less than 14 percent fifteen years ago to 21.7 percent today.

In 1854, Yung Wing — the first Asian Yale student — attended Yale as an international student from China, long before Asians had become culturally set apart from other minorities in national discourse. He was also the first Chinese person to graduate from a U.S. college. In fact, Wing was an active member on campus, a member of DKE and Brothers in Unity, a literary society. He later organized the Chinese Educational Mission, which sent Chinese students to study abroad in the United States; however, his U.S citizenship was later revoked due to anti-Chinese immigration laws. At this time in the United States, Asians and Asian Americans, like other racial minorities, faced unjust de jure discrimination by the federal government that separated them from white Americans.

Rockwell “Rocky” Chin, GRD ’71, who currently serves as Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity & Diversity at the New York State Division of Human Rights, participated in forming the Asian American Students Association (AASA) while he was a student at Yale. Chin’s family history at Yale extends through much of the 20th century. “Our history goes back to Yung Wing,” he begins, “but since then the position of Asian Americans has grown through time.” In fact, Chin comes from a lineage of Yalies: his grandfather graduated Yale in 1908 and his father, Rockwood Q.P. Chin, graduated in the 1930s. Chin explains in an email, “my own curiosity [about this time period] comes from the fact that my American-born father attended Yale [when] there were only a handful of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders then!”

Yale’s current makeup differs dramatically from its historical reputation as an old boys’ club. Once upon a time, white Protestant males from upper class American families overwhelmed the ranks of each class. As Jasmine Zhuang, GH ’13, aptly describes in the Yale Historical Review, diversity meant only that there was a “small proportion of students who attended public schools.” Facing fierce backlash from alumni, Yale President Kingman Brewster, Jr., implemented initiatives in Yale’s admissions processes to increase the school’s diversity. Minority student populations started to grow.

In 1969, the Asian American Students Association — now called the Asian American Students Alliance — was established as the first iteration of an Asian American Yale student group. Later, in 1981, the Asian American Cultural Center (AACC), one of the four current cultural houses, was established.

Though Chin only attended Yale for two years, from 1969 to 1971, it was “the first time there was critical mass of Asian Pacific Americans at Yale,” which included Don Nakanishi, SY ’71, who was one of the leaders of the formation of AASA in 1969. Although there was a larger Asian American population than ever before, Nakanishi still describes the amount of Asian Americans as a “drop in the bucket” when he attended the school, with exactly 59 Asians at Yale College.

In Chin’s time, there were no Asian American studies courses and no Asian American student groups. Yale had just begun to admit women, and the United States had just begun implementing affirmative action. “We all worked very closely with the Chicano and the Black students.” Chin explains, “At Yale, we all felt we were a kind of minority. We felt somewhat isolated, except when we were together. There were a lot of common issues: ethnic studies, how the University did not relate to the Black communities that worked in New Haven, etc.”

Today’s Yale echoes similar underpinnings of solidarity. Like many of its peer institutions, Yale has grown in diversity. In recent discourse, however, Asian American-ness has been grouped with whiteness and pushed away from other communities of color. In fact, in the Yale Daily News’ staff-written piece, “Our diversity problem,” published on Oct. 29, the News Desk added an editor’s note to reassure that “in pointing out that East Asians are well represented in our Managing Board, [they] did not intend to dismiss the discrimination that East Asians face in accessing top leadership in institutions like the News, or to make the point that they are proximal to whiteness.”

The ongoing debate about Asian discrimination through affirmative action rests on the “model minority” myth — a term first coined in 1966 in The New York Times Magazine by sociologist William Petersen. The “model minority” myth describes the perceived phenomena of a minority achieving higher socioeconomic success than the population average. It has changed the dialogue of Asian Americans in the United States in the context of American race issues. However, the AACC and many — but not all — Asian Americans at Yale still support affirmative action and stand in solidarity with other minorities.

In an official statement, Joliana Yee, Director of the AACC, expresses hope that students “will come to see how a race-conscious, whole-person approach to admissions is necessary to strengthening our communities of learning and a step in the right direction for improving access, equity and inclusion in higher education.” This support for affirmative action is echoed among many Asians on campus.

Kathy Min, BR ’21, an Asian American student at Yale, feels that solidarity among people of color is important and still abundant at Yale. “We’re at a pretty political campus, and many are quite politically conscious,” Min explains. She adds, however, that both solidarity and division have arisen within Asian Americans and other racial minorities on campus. “A lot of Asian Americans are against affirmative action; they have very misplaced anger that it is hurting them,” she notes. The notion that some Asian Americans stand against affirmative action, and thus, other minorities, is addressed in Yee’s email as she tries to dispel the idea that affirmative action’s perceived negatives outweigh its positives.

The AACC still serves as a space for Asian Americans that recognizes the possible difficulties of being a racial minority at Yale. However, the “model minority” myth and public perception of Asian American positionality has contributed to a certain reputation of compliance. Rita Wang, MC ’19, a first-year counselor and former AACC peer liaison, however, notes that she has discussed discrimination with her first-years in the form of microaggressions and stereotypes. “I grew up with the stereotype that Asian Americans were politically inactive and compliant,” Wang notes, “so I was really interested in pushing that notion.” As a peer liaison at the AACC, Wang has noted that it is unfair to say that the AACC is “less activist.”

Reflecting on the AACC, Chin says, “It was a concession by Yale, I think, to address some of the requests and demands of the Asian American students. It did not exist when I was there.” In 1972, AASA was given a one-room office in the basement of Durfee. Four years later in 1977, the East Coast Asian American Student Union founded a Yale chapter, and in 1981, the AACC was established.

AASA is rooted in a history of activism. The creators of AASA advocated for the first Asian American Studies class at Yale, eventually titled “The Asian American Experience,” and in 1971 founded the Amerasia Journal, an Asian American newsletter that is now a premier academic publication in Asian American Studies.

However, even in 1969, Asian Americans came up against the notion that they did not face true discrimination compared to other racial minorities. In fact, in a 1969 statement to the Yale Daily News, Peter M.C. Choy, YC ’69, LAW ’72, explains that one of the most difficult stereotypes that AASA needed to overcome was “that Asian Americans are perfectly assimilated and face no discrimination in American society.” Brewster echoes that statement in a memorandum of the same year that even among those most politically conscious, there is the misconception that “what problems they may have are qualitatively and quantitatively minor.”

Still, this American era was politically charged. It was a time of protests, activism, and Civil Rights conflict. Chin and Nakanishi’s generation became involved in the student movement and the anti-war movement. “By the time I entered Yale, my eyes had been opened to the importance and problems regarding [the] lack of racial diversity, and how student mobilization could work,” Chin explains.

The Asian American Studies course was another example of student involvement. While many Asian American students had actively participated in on-campus political actions through other on-campus minority groups, they felt that academic inclusion was necessary to address the Asian American community’s unique problems and history. Professor Chitoshi Yanaga taught “The Asian American Experience,” but described the course’s creation as a student effort. Choy explains in his 1969 statement that Asian Americans at Yale hoped that the material addressed in the class would challenge the notion that Asian Americans faced little discrimination.

Some Asian American students report that in extracurricular settings, Asian American-ness is unintentionally lumped together with whiteness. Wang, who was former Speaker of the Yale Political Union (YPU), explains that the YPU board “struggled with seeing me as the only POC woman,” often talking to her as if she were a member of the white majority. For students like Wang, the AACC provides a space where the Asian American experience isn’t grouped in with white experience.

Tina Lu, Head of Pauli Murray College, who resides on the Advisory Board of the AACC, notes that the AACC is extremely interconnected with the other campus cultural groups. “The AACC has always been super clear about how it is part of a social world involving other cultural centers, that it is one of many,” she states, reflecting back on the history of Asian Americans at Yale in conjunction with other minority groups.

With the recent affirmative action complaints levied against Yale and Harvard, the original core values of AASA in comparison with today’s manifestation of the AACC and Asian Americans at Yale come under closer scrutiny. Min and Wang both indicate there are some Asian Americans who stand in opposition to affirmative action and the benefits it may give to other minorities. Professor Daniel HoSang, Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, states that there is still widespread support amongst Asian American college students for programs that promote diversity and equality. “The first generation of Asian American Yale students of the 1960s and ’70s were very, very clear that their interests were fully aligned with other students of color,” HoSang explains. “But, of course, any time that groups grow bigger or become diverse — as the Asian American population at Yale has become, there’s going to be ideological and political disagreements.”

The AACC has grown a lot since 1969, when Civil Rights issues dominated the national dialogue and only a few years after the immigration ban was lifted, yet it still retains some essence of its original activist and intercultural origins. “We are in a moment of American politics where everything is at the surface,” says Lu, in reference to racial minorities in America. “All these conversations are coming together in very active ways.”

Even as new types of discrimination, stereotypes, and policies arise, the AACC and AASA continually aim to remain active, heard, and conscious.


The Center Will Hold was originally published in The Yale Herald on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

The Center Will Hold

On a Wednesday morning, the words “Department of Justice,” “discrimination,” and “Asian-American applicants” appeared in a Yale campus-wide email by President Peter Salovey. Like Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) v. Harvard, a case which first rankled the country a year ago, the position of Asian Americans as a model minority separate from other minorities came into question once again. In the email, Salovey defends Yale’s commitment to diversity. He cites an increase in the percentage of Asian Americans in the Class of 2022, from less than 14 percent fifteen years ago to 21.7 percent today.

In 1854, Yung Wing — the first Asian Yale student — attended Yale as an international student from China, long before Asians had become culturally set apart from other minorities in national discourse. He was also the first Chinese person to graduate from a U.S. college. In fact, Wing was an active member on campus, a member of DKE and Brothers in Unity, a literary society. He later organized the Chinese Educational Mission, which sent Chinese students to study abroad in the United States; however, his U.S citizenship was later revoked due to anti-Chinese immigration laws. At this time in the United States, Asians and Asian Americans, like other racial minorities, faced unjust de jure discrimination by the federal government that separated them from white Americans.

Rockwell “Rocky” Chin, GRD ’71, who currently serves as Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity & Diversity at the New York State Division of Human Rights, participated in forming the Asian American Students Association (AASA) while he was a student at Yale. Chin’s family history at Yale extends through much of the 20th century. “Our history goes back to Yung Wing,” he begins, “but since then the position of Asian Americans has grown through time.” In fact, Chin comes from a lineage of Yalies: his grandfather graduated Yale in 1908 and his father, Rockwood Q.P. Chin, graduated in the 1930s. Chin explains in an email, “my own curiosity [about this time period] comes from the fact that my American-born father attended Yale [when] there were only a handful of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders then!”

Yale’s current makeup differs dramatically from its historical reputation as an old boys’ club. Once upon a time, white Protestant males from upper class American families overwhelmed the ranks of each class. As Jasmine Zhuang, GH ’13, aptly describes in the Yale Historical Review, diversity meant only that there was a “small proportion of students who attended public schools.” Facing fierce backlash from alumni, Yale President Kingman Brewster, Jr., implemented initiatives in Yale’s admissions processes to increase the school’s diversity. Minority student populations started to grow.

In 1969, the Asian American Students Association — now called the Asian American Students Alliance — was established as the first iteration of an Asian American Yale student group. Later, in 1981, the Asian American Cultural Center (AACC), one of the four current cultural houses, was established.

Though Chin only attended Yale for two years, from 1969 to 1971, it was “the first time there was critical mass of Asian Pacific Americans at Yale,” which included Don Nakanishi, SY ’71, who was one of the leaders of the formation of AASA in 1969. Although there was a larger Asian American population than ever before, Nakanishi still describes the amount of Asian Americans as a “drop in the bucket” when he attended the school, with exactly 59 Asians at Yale College.

In Chin’s time, there were no Asian American studies courses and no Asian American student groups. Yale had just begun to admit women, and the United States had just begun implementing affirmative action. “We all worked very closely with the Chicano and the Black students.” Chin explains, “At Yale, we all felt we were a kind of minority. We felt somewhat isolated, except when we were together. There were a lot of common issues: ethnic studies, how the University did not relate to the Black communities that worked in New Haven, etc.”

Today’s Yale echoes similar underpinnings of solidarity. Like many of its peer institutions, Yale has grown in diversity. In recent discourse, however, Asian American-ness has been grouped with whiteness and pushed away from other communities of color. In fact, in the Yale Daily News’ staff-written piece, “Our diversity problem,” published on Oct. 29, the News Desk added an editor’s note to reassure that “in pointing out that East Asians are well represented in our Managing Board, [they] did not intend to dismiss the discrimination that East Asians face in accessing top leadership in institutions like the News, or to make the point that they are proximal to whiteness.”

The ongoing debate about Asian discrimination through affirmative action rests on the “model minority” myth — a term first coined in 1966 in The New York Times Magazine by sociologist William Petersen. The “model minority” myth describes the perceived phenomena of a minority achieving higher socioeconomic success than the population average. It has changed the dialogue of Asian Americans in the United States in the context of American race issues. However, the AACC and many — but not all — Asian Americans at Yale still support affirmative action and stand in solidarity with other minorities.

In an official statement, Joliana Yee, Director of the AACC, expresses hope that students “will come to see how a race-conscious, whole-person approach to admissions is necessary to strengthening our communities of learning and a step in the right direction for improving access, equity and inclusion in higher education.” This support for affirmative action is echoed among many Asians on campus.

Kathy Min, BR ’21, an Asian American student at Yale, feels that solidarity among people of color is important and still abundant at Yale. “We’re at a pretty political campus, and many are quite politically conscious,” Min explains. She adds, however, that both solidarity and division have arisen within Asian Americans and other racial minorities on campus. “A lot of Asian Americans are against affirmative action; they have very misplaced anger that it is hurting them,” she notes. The notion that some Asian Americans stand against affirmative action, and thus, other minorities, is addressed in Yee’s email as she tries to dispel the idea that affirmative action’s perceived negatives outweigh its positives.

The AACC still serves as a space for Asian Americans that recognizes the possible difficulties of being a racial minority at Yale. However, the “model minority” myth and public perception of Asian American positionality has contributed to a certain reputation of compliance. Rita Wang, MC ’19, a first-year counselor and former AACC peer liaison, however, notes that she has discussed discrimination with her first-years in the form of microaggressions and stereotypes. “I grew up with the stereotype that Asian Americans were politically inactive and compliant,” Wang notes, “so I was really interested in pushing that notion.” As a peer liaison at the AACC, Wang has noted that it is unfair to say that the AACC is “less activist.”

Reflecting on the AACC, Chin says, “It was a concession by Yale, I think, to address some of the requests and demands of the Asian American students. It did not exist when I was there.” In 1972, AASA was given a one-room office in the basement of Durfee. Four years later in 1977, the East Coast Asian American Student Union founded a Yale chapter, and in 1981, the AACC was established.

AASA is rooted in a history of activism. The creators of AASA advocated for the first Asian American Studies class at Yale, eventually titled “The Asian American Experience,” and in 1971 founded the Amerasia Journal, an Asian American newsletter that is now a premier academic publication in Asian American Studies.

However, even in 1969, Asian Americans came up against the notion that they did not face true discrimination compared to other racial minorities. In fact, in a 1969 statement to the Yale Daily News, Peter M.C. Choy, YC ’69, LAW ’72, explains that one of the most difficult stereotypes that AASA needed to overcome was “that Asian Americans are perfectly assimilated and face no discrimination in American society.” Brewster echoes that statement in a memorandum of the same year that even among those most politically conscious, there is the misconception that “what problems they may have are qualitatively and quantitatively minor.”

Still, this American era was politically charged. It was a time of protests, activism, and Civil Rights conflict. Chin and Nakanishi’s generation became involved in the student movement and the anti-war movement. “By the time I entered Yale, my eyes had been opened to the importance and problems regarding [the] lack of racial diversity, and how student mobilization could work,” Chin explains.

The Asian American Studies course was another example of student involvement. While many Asian American students had actively participated in on-campus political actions through other on-campus minority groups, they felt that academic inclusion was necessary to address the Asian American community’s unique problems and history. Professor Chitoshi Yanaga taught “The Asian American Experience,” but described the course’s creation as a student effort. Choy explains in his 1969 statement that Asian Americans at Yale hoped that the material addressed in the class would challenge the notion that Asian Americans faced little discrimination.

Some Asian American students report that in extracurricular settings, Asian American-ness is unintentionally lumped together with whiteness. Wang, who was former Speaker of the Yale Political Union (YPU), explains that the YPU board “struggled with seeing me as the only POC woman,” often talking to her as if she were a member of the white majority. For students like Wang, the AACC provides a space where the Asian American experience isn’t grouped in with white experience.

Tina Lu, Head of Pauli Murray College, who resides on the Advisory Board of the AACC, notes that the AACC is extremely interconnected with the other campus cultural groups. “The AACC has always been super clear about how it is part of a social world involving other cultural centers, that it is one of many,” she states, reflecting back on the history of Asian Americans at Yale in conjunction with other minority groups.

With the recent affirmative action complaints levied against Yale and Harvard, the original core values of AASA in comparison with today’s manifestation of the AACC and Asian Americans at Yale come under closer scrutiny. Min and Wang both indicate there are some Asian Americans who stand in opposition to affirmative action and the benefits it may give to other minorities. Professor Daniel HoSang, Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, states that there is still widespread support amongst Asian American college students for programs that promote diversity and equality. “The first generation of Asian American Yale students of the 1960s and ’70s were very, very clear that their interests were fully aligned with other students of color,” HoSang explains. “But, of course, any time that groups grow bigger or become diverse — as the Asian American population at Yale has become, there’s going to be ideological and political disagreements.”

The AACC has grown a lot since 1969, when Civil Rights issues dominated the national dialogue and only a few years after the immigration ban was lifted, yet it still retains some essence of its original activist and intercultural origins. “We are in a moment of American politics where everything is at the surface,” says Lu, in reference to racial minorities in America. “All these conversations are coming together in very active ways.”

Even as new types of discrimination, stereotypes, and policies arise, the AACC and AASA continually aim to remain active, heard, and conscious.


The Center Will Hold was originally published in The Yale Herald on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

FRIEDMAN: On minors, think carefully

Every academic recess, I travel around upstate New York for a few days to visit public high schools as an Admissions Ambassador on behalf of the Admissions Office. It’s a fun job: I get to meet bright students who might not otherwise interact with Yale and talk about my favorite parts of going to college here.

When I was a first year training for the program, we were all told that the most effective information sessions highlight the things that make Yale different from its peer institutions. Now, with more than a handful of these sessions under my belt, I’ve internalized a bulleted list of Yale differentiators for each of a few different categories that I like to tick through. Residential colleges and suites, for instance, set Yale’s student life apart from that of other schools.

But the single biggest differentiator, judging by the nods and wide eyes of energetic high schoolers, isn’t related to the predictably fun categories, like extracurriculars or study abroad. Instead, what seems to be most attractive to so many prospective applicants is Yale’s academic structure, in which minors don’t exist and double majoring is relatively difficult. The theory behind it is that Yale would prefer that students specialize through their major, cover their distributional requirements and then still have the freedom and flexibility to take a diversity of other classes simply for the sake of learning.

Let’s be clear: That freedom isn’t just an admissions talking point. Instead, it is perhaps the single biggest difference between our academic experience and that of our peer schools. That’s why the News reporting yesterday that Yale College Dean Marvin Chun may consider introducing minors to the Yale College curriculum should alarm us deeply.

Chun cited the “enormous success” of Multidisciplinary Academic Programs, like Human Rights Studies and Energy Studies, as one reason that minors might deserve a second look. But these programs are much more than the mere fistful of niche courses that a minor would comprise. Rather, MAPs combine coursework with significant research and field experience requirements, as well as softer components like community obligations. A signature feature of the Education Studies program, for example, is a weekly dinner, where the entire program cohort gathers to discuss particular issues in education. To participate in a MAP is a to commit to something much weightier than, say, taking five classes in philosophy.

The dean’s office has also argued that minors would bring the ability to balance professional aspirations with the humanities. With minors, the theory goes, a future banker could simultaneously prepare for her career with a major in economics and satisfy her interest in drawing with a minor in art. But the truth is — unfair, maybe; wonderful, totally — that a Yale student’s major has little influence on her ability to get a job. In corporate recruiting, for example, the thing that matters most is that you go to Yale, not that you chose to major in economics rather than English. In fact, many of the most selective banks and firms choose for those who study the obscure and interesting rather than the milquetoast. Introducing minors to professionally oriented Yalies would destroy the rigorous, sustained education in the humanities that so many students take now. With the option of minoring in art history, many more Yalies would take safe, “employable” paths, like computer science and engineering, relegating what many of them likely view as their real interests to a minor made up of just a few courses. Forcing students to study a single field with depth and vigor rather than giving them a safe way out is one of the things that makes Yale different and better than its peers.

The biggest consideration when thinking about minors, though, shouldn’t be comparisons with MAPs or pre-professionalism. It should be who, really, Yale people are: credentialists. The gritty, ambitious high schooler admitted to Yale doesn’t forget her conceptions of conventional marks of achievement when it comes to planning her academic course here. Introducing minors means introducing a new hoop to jump through, a new entry on a resume and a new credential to collect. If Yale’s culture — comparatively relaxed, relatively interesting, somewhat quirky — is a selling point, introducing the opportunity to minor alongside a traditional major would destroy a lot of what applicants see as one of Yale’s competitive advantages.

High schoolers view Yale’s academic structure, forcing exploration rather than measured and planned achievement, as a benefit. They consider it liberating, deeply spontaneous and profoundly exciting — something that makes Yale distinct. Introducing minors would be a step toward the kinds of overly calculated academic experiences that characterize our competition.

Emil Friedman is a junior in Silliman College. His columns run every other Friday. Contact him at emil.friedman@yale.edu .

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

DSU Embraces Cryotherapy

It’s no secret that Dakota State University is remarkably passionate about maintaining the health and wellness of its students. The Student Health office is always available (during office hours and with student ID) for minor illnesses and injuries, and the nurse can refer more serious cases to a local physician as one of three free visits per year. The Madison Community Center is available for students to work out and participate in sensational fitness programs like Aqua Zumba and Shaun T’s Piyo. However, a lesser known service has been under our noses all along: the top floor of the Mundt Library has long been a floor-wide community cryotherapy chamber.

Cryotherapy is commonly known as the use of extreme cold to rejuvenate the body and promote healing. This, of course, comes as no surprise to the regulars of the Library who return day after day, mysteriously drawn to the floor despite the cold. Rest assured, its perfectly normal — the resulting adrenaline rush from cryotherapy is known to be addictive, and benefits accumulate with each treatment. While not technically a medical procedure, cryotherapy functions similarly to acupuncture; it has health benefits without being necessarily performed by a medical professional, which means that it’s legally safe (but if you have high blood pressure, are pregnant, or are a child, you should probably ask a doctor). According to medicalnewstoday.com, benefits range from pain relief, muscle healing, and reduced inflammation to dementia prevention, lowering the risk of cancer, and treating migraine headaches.

Always the innovator, DSU has opted for some small changes in the cryotherapy process to more adequately benefit students. Traditionally, cryotherapy necessitates the participant to strip down to underwear and enter a chamber of approximately -200 degrees Fahrenheit where they stand between 2 and 4 minutes to prevent frostbite. Participants in DSU’s cryotherapy aren’t expected to adhere to these extremes — that would be sadistic — but instead, students are allowed to remain dressed, stay as long as they like during library hours, and even sit down. Students can also bring their laptops and textbooks, able to work on school assignments until their fingers freeze solid thus preventing them from typing.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

“Supergirl” Crafts a Shockingly Real Political Allegory in Fourth Season

c/o comicbook.com

c/o comicbook.com

When it comes to its politics, “Supergirl” has been a reliably simplistic show. The story of Superman’s cousin, Kara Zor-El (Melissa Benoist), presented its progressive lessons to the audience in a manner similar to how old Saturday morning cartoons would. Generally speaking, the antagonists would express the views of real-life right wing cultural figures in the guise of superhero and science fiction related antics. The villains would be cartoonish and over-the-top, their arguments pathetically weak, motivated by nothing other than irrational evil, and would easily lose to the heroes, both in the physical sense, and in terms of the moral debate. Other times, the political message would be randomly shoved into an episode that was otherwise more straightforward. The show was better at regurgitating progressive talking points than it was at telling compelling, political allegories.

That trend began to slowly change towards the end of the third season, which was otherwise plagued by sloppy storytelling decisions and dull conflicts. Still, some of the show’s finest moments came when it decided to seriously wrestle with real-world political issues. In the episode entitled, “Not Kansas,” James and J’onn (Jeremy Jordan and David Harewood), discover that a gun manufactured specifically for their government agency was also sold to the public, leading to the deaths of several civilians. By the episode’s finish, J’onn decides his agency, the DEO (the Department of Extra-Normal Operations), must use non-lethal weaponry against their enemies, due to the risks associated with traditional, lethal armaments. It’s not exactly a subtle criticism of America’s gun culture, but it doesn’t need to be. It works well because it’s a message that’s integrated organically into the story, doesn’t present the debate as overly one-sided, and takes its message seriously, not as a forced and cheesy addendum to the story.

Yet, the political power of that episode pales in comparison to nearly everything the series has done in Season 4. The big bad of the season is not yet another maniacal alien, but an all-too human threat, literally and figuratively speaking. Besides his unintentionally silly metal mask, Agent Liberty (Sam Witwer) is an all-too-real villain, a seductively charismatic charlatan out to prove that all aliens are evil. He’s the show’s answer to its failed political storylines, and to the politics of today. This new villain is an amalgamation of many far-right wing figures present today, from charismatic yet deeply immoral media figures, to Trump voters dealing with real economic issues through racism.

His origin story is impeccably crafted through flashbacks in the third episode, “Man of Steel.” There, we learn that the now-demagogic figure is actually named Ben Lockwood and was once a history professor who was sympathetic toward aliens. Yet, the show reveals that he has suffered in the face of Supergirl and her crew’s actions. During the events of the last three season finales, his house was destroyed, his father killed, he was fired from his job for speaking out against aliens, and more. He finds logical reasons to blame these tragedies not on bad luck, but on aliens. It was those aliens after all, who destroyed his life; he uses his knowledge of American history to craft warped narratives about the threat posed by outsiders, who are now comprised of aliens. All of which leads him to begin spreading his propaganda and leading violent attacks against aliens.

It’s a storyline that works on an impressive number of levels. For starters, the show expertly walks the fine line between presenting Lockwood as sympathetic and as a force of evil. He has suffered unjustly over the last few years, but the show makes clear that his jump to blaming all aliens for his woes is illogical and based in hatred. Yet, this same illogic of his is also what prevents him from being another cartoonish villain for Supergirl to face off against, and instead makes him a genuinely compelling, and scary protagonist.

If anything, what makes him and his villainous plans so unnerving is how the show expertly relates them back to reality. This is a man who has inspired others to dress up in masks and hoods and go door to door beating up and potentially killing innocent aliens. The similarities between the violent events of the show, and the racist violence embroiling America, are unnerving to say the least. They’re made somewhat more palatable by the show’s cartoony, slightly silly tone: this is a superhero show after all. As a result, the writers are smart to break the tension of watching a violent home invasion with a house pet morphing into a kind of dragon. Rather than work against its political messages, the show’s generally silly tone works in its favor, making it easier to watch otherwise horrifyingly real events unfold. Simply put, the fourth season of “Supergirl” is some of the best political allegory for our current moment being produced; and I am just as surprised about that as you are.

Still, there’s plenty of reason to be skeptical as to whether or not the show can maintain its current momentum. As already mentioned, it has previously struggled with political storylines and big bads, and it’s not impossible for the show to fall back on bad habits. It also remains to be seen how well this narrative could be resolved: “Supergirl” has always prided itself on being anti-violence, instead in favor of appealing to the goodness in everyone. It’s not hard to see how this could backfire, with some kind of forced, overly sentimental scene in which Lockwood and his goons renounce their former beliefs (not that such a scene couldn’t work, only that it needs to be handled gracefully to avoid schmaltz and sloppy motives for a change of heart). The show has also been teasing a more comical, ridiculous villain in the form of a clone of Supergirl, who seems to be working for the Russian government. It’s not unlikely that the show will abandon its current storyline and fall back on yet another uninteresting, one-dimensional villain.

Still, the current season of “Supergirl” has been remarkable to watch. It’s a smart examination of contemporary politics, balancing empathy for its villain without forgetting the maliciousness he preaches. Its cartoonish tone has made its worryingly real story easier to swallow. Most of all, it shows growth and maturity from a show that seemed to have been spinning its wheels for the past two seasons.

 

Henry Spiro can be reached at hspiro@wesleyan.edu and on Twitter @JudgeyMcJudge1.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

“Supergirl” Crafts a Shockingly Real Political Allegory in Fourth Season

c/o comicbook.com

c/o comicbook.com

When it comes to its politics, “Supergirl” has been a reliably simplistic show. The story of Superman’s cousin, Kara Zor-El (Melissa Benoist), presented its progressive lessons to the audience in a manner similar to how old Saturday morning cartoons would. Generally speaking, the antagonists would express the views of real-life right wing cultural figures in the guise of superhero and science fiction related antics. The villains would be cartoonish and over-the-top, their arguments pathetically weak, motivated by nothing other than irrational evil, and would easily lose to the heroes, both in the physical sense, and in terms of the moral debate. Other times, the political message would be randomly shoved into an episode that was otherwise more straightforward. The show was better at regurgitating progressive talking points than it was at telling compelling, political allegories.

That trend began to slowly change towards the end of the third season, which was otherwise plagued by sloppy storytelling decisions and dull conflicts. Still, some of the show’s finest moments came when it decided to seriously wrestle with real-world political issues. In the episode entitled, “Not Kansas,” James and J’onn (Jeremy Jordan and David Harewood), discover that a gun manufactured specifically for their government agency was also sold to the public, leading to the deaths of several civilians. By the episode’s finish, J’onn decides his agency, the DEO (the Department of Extra-Normal Operations), must use non-lethal weaponry against their enemies, due to the risks associated with traditional, lethal armaments. It’s not exactly a subtle criticism of America’s gun culture, but it doesn’t need to be. It works well because it’s a message that’s integrated organically into the story, doesn’t present the debate as overly one-sided, and takes its message seriously, not as a forced and cheesy addendum to the story.

Yet, the political power of that episode pales in comparison to nearly everything the series has done in Season 4. The big bad of the season is not yet another maniacal alien, but an all-too human threat, literally and figuratively speaking. Besides his unintentionally silly metal mask, Agent Liberty (Sam Witwer) is an all-too-real villain, a seductively charismatic charlatan out to prove that all aliens are evil. He’s the show’s answer to its failed political storylines, and to the politics of today. This new villain is an amalgamation of many far-right wing figures present today, from charismatic yet deeply immoral media figures, to Trump voters dealing with real economic issues through racism.

His origin story is impeccably crafted through flashbacks in the third episode, “Man of Steel.” There, we learn that the now-demagogic figure is actually named Ben Lockwood and was once a history professor who was sympathetic toward aliens. Yet, the show reveals that he has suffered in the face of Supergirl and her crew’s actions. During the events of the last three season finales, his house was destroyed, his father killed, he was fired from his job for speaking out against aliens, and more. He finds logical reasons to blame these tragedies not on bad luck, but on aliens. It was those aliens after all, who destroyed his life; he uses his knowledge of American history to craft warped narratives about the threat posed by outsiders, who are now comprised of aliens. All of which leads him to begin spreading his propaganda and leading violent attacks against aliens.

It’s a storyline that works on an impressive number of levels. For starters, the show expertly walks the fine line between presenting Lockwood as sympathetic and as a force of evil. He has suffered unjustly over the last few years, but the show makes clear that his jump to blaming all aliens for his woes is illogical and based in hatred. Yet, this same illogic of his is also what prevents him from being another cartoonish villain for Supergirl to face off against, and instead makes him a genuinely compelling, and scary protagonist.

If anything, what makes him and his villainous plans so unnerving is how the show expertly relates them back to reality. This is a man who has inspired others to dress up in masks and hoods and go door to door beating up and potentially killing innocent aliens. The similarities between the violent events of the show, and the racist violence embroiling America, are unnerving to say the least. They’re made somewhat more palatable by the show’s cartoony, slightly silly tone: this is a superhero show after all. As a result, the writers are smart to break the tension of watching a violent home invasion with a house pet morphing into a kind of dragon. Rather than work against its political messages, the show’s generally silly tone works in its favor, making it easier to watch otherwise horrifyingly real events unfold. Simply put, the fourth season of “Supergirl” is some of the best political allegory for our current moment being produced; and I am just as surprised about that as you are.

Still, there’s plenty of reason to be skeptical as to whether or not the show can maintain its current momentum. As already mentioned, it has previously struggled with political storylines and big bads, and it’s not impossible for the show to fall back on bad habits. It also remains to be seen how well this narrative could be resolved: “Supergirl” has always prided itself on being anti-violence, instead in favor of appealing to the goodness in everyone. It’s not hard to see how this could backfire, with some kind of forced, overly sentimental scene in which Lockwood and his goons renounce their former beliefs (not that such a scene couldn’t work, only that it needs to be handled gracefully to avoid schmaltz and sloppy motives for a change of heart). The show has also been teasing a more comical, ridiculous villain in the form of a clone of Supergirl, who seems to be working for the Russian government. It’s not unlikely that the show will abandon its current storyline and fall back on yet another uninteresting, one-dimensional villain.

Still, the current season of “Supergirl” has been remarkable to watch. It’s a smart examination of contemporary politics, balancing empathy for its villain without forgetting the maliciousness he preaches. Its cartoonish tone has made its worryingly real story easier to swallow. Most of all, it shows growth and maturity from a show that seemed to have been spinning its wheels for the past two seasons.

 

Henry Spiro can be reached at hspiro@wesleyan.edu and on Twitter @JudgeyMcJudge1.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Oak Lawn switching to a new emergency communication system

By Dermot Connolly

Oak Lawn will be switching over from Everbridge emergency notification system to the Smart911 system for emergency notification of residents as of Jan. 1.

The village board unanimously approved the purchase of the Smart911 software at its Nov. 13 meeting after Director of Emergency Services Diana Tousignant spoke at some length about it. She is in charge of the 911 center in the village.

The software will be integrated into the village’s emergency alerting system, taking the place of Everbridge, which, Tousignant explained, only has emergency alert capabilities. She said that residents who already have registered their phone numbers with Everbridge, which calls or sends text messages to registered phones, will be notified about how to sign up for the new system, which has other capabilities as well.

Tousignant stressed that the village will still be able to send out emergency alerts using the reverse 911 system to all residents, whether or not they are registered with either system,

She explained that those who register for the program on the Smart911 website are able to include in their profile details about medications or special needs about themselves or anyone in the household that first responders will have access to in case of emergency.

“If there is an elderly person in the house who you think should get these alerts, you can provide their information, as well as an email address that we can use to contact you to keep it updated,” said Tousignant.

She noted that residents or business owners can also include the layouts of their buildings, which also could helpful for first responders as well.

“The system is very easy to use, as you will see when you go online,” said the director.

Another advantage of Smart911 cited by Tousignant is its ability to pinpoint exactly where a user’s call is coming from, which is not always possible with cellphones because the signals triangulate against the nearest cell towers.

“It is sometimes very difficult to find people on cellphones. You could be a block away from where the signal is. But just like the ‘Find Your Phone’ app on Apple products, as long as yours is a Smart911 number, even if you are traveling, we can detect exactly where you are,” said Tousignant.

“Smart911 has been around for a while but it was frankly very expensive. But now, with the added features, and the partnership between the makers of Smart911 software and ‘“big players’ such as Apple and Google has made it easier and less expensive for the village to get it,” added Tousignant.

“In our opinion, Smart 911 will provide a more robust and user-friendly alert system than Everbridge, for comparable cost. In earlier years, Smart911 was cost-prohibitive for communities like Oak Lawn but over time their cost has come down to a level that makes it feasible,” said Village Manager Larry Deetjen.

“Sometimes, in an emergency, you can’t even think of your address. What excites me so much about this is, even if you can’t speak, all your information is with the 911 system. I think this will save lives,” said Mayor Sandra Bury.

“It will save lives and it has saved lives,” said Tousignant, noting that the system is already in use in some neighboring communities and across the country.

“I am sure this will be a huge improvement over Everbridge, which was affectionately known as NeverBridge,” said Trustee Bob Streit (3rd), referring to the problems with getting alerts that residents often complained about.

He sought assurances that any personal information provided to the Smart911 system would be kept private and Tousignant said it would not be publicly accessible.

“It is a privileged program. Anything going into it is just going into a 911 center. We deal with confidential medical information every day,” said Tousignant.

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Matadors come back to top Lancers 73-67

Women’s basketball saw themselves down big early, but managed to rally and defeat Cal Baptist 73-67.

CSUN scored 29 points in the fourth quarter, more points than they had in the entire first half.

The Lancers’ solid defense did not give up many easy looks and CSUN struggled offensively to find looks early in the game. Cal Baptist would start the second half on an 6-0 run before CSUN could score in a point.

They eventually built an 11-point lead in the fourth quarter, their largest of the game before CSUN surged.

The Lancers were led by sharp shooter Emma Meriggioli, who scored 24 points, all from behind the arc. She would only miss her final attempt, going eight of nine on the game.

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Coach Jason Flowers draws up a play during a timeout. Photo credit: Roberto Cisneros

“We got to be a much better team on the defensive end,” said head coach Jason Flowers. “So we’ll go back to work tomorrow and try and get that there.”

Facing a 59-51 deficit in the fourth, Northridge caught fire and went on a 13-0 run.

The run was led by senior guard Serafina Maulupe, who scored 14 of her 16 points in the second half, including two big 3-pointers which gave the Matadors the lead.

“Its all about confidence,” Maulupe said. “Just coming out there, doing my job and doing what I got to do to help the team.”

Senior center Channon Fluker led the team for the second straight game. Fluker played only 23 minutes but scored 18 points. She also managed to pull down 17 rebounds, matching her season-high, including seven offensive boards, while recording a season-high six blocks as well.

Maulupe was matched in points by CSUN forward De’Jionae Calloway who registered her first double-double of the year, grabbing 13 rebounds to go along with her 16 points.

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De'Jionae Calloway drives to the basket against Lancer forward Caitlyn Harper. Photo credit: Roberto Cisneros

Calloway was second in minutes to only guard Meghann Henderson, who ran the floor most of the game. The sophomore registered a team-high six assists to go with a block and a steal.

Wednesday’s win marked the first game the Matadors had three scorers above 15 points.

With Calloway, Fluker and Maulupe all in sync, the team’s scoring average can make a very strong leap from their 65.1 average.

CSUN will now head out on a tough road trip. Their first stop is a matchup with the 5-1 Santa Clara Broncos before the team heads to Berkeley to face an undefeated California team.

Both of CSUN’s opponents have not played since Saturday Nov. 24 so CSUN may catch a break with some rusty opponents. The team will need its key three players to show up to steal these tough rough games.

Matadors and Broncos tip off Friday, Nov. 30 at 4 p.m. CSUN and the Bears will tip off Sunday, Dec. 2 at 2 p.m.

“Being down 11 in the fourth quarter speaks to the potential of the group,” said Flowers. “But my job is to make sure they reach their potential consistently. We’re team that shows flashes from game to game. We got to figure it out.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Matadors come back to top Lancers 73-67

Women’s basketball saw themselves down big early, but managed to rally and defeat Cal Baptist 73-67.

CSUN scored 29 points in the fourth quarter, more points than they had in the entire first half.

The Lancers’ solid defense did not give up many easy looks and CSUN struggled offensively to find looks early in the game. Cal Baptist would start the second half on an 6-0 run before CSUN could score in a point.

They eventually built an 11-point lead in the fourth quarter, their largest of the game before CSUN surged.

The Lancers were led by sharp shooter Emma Meriggioli, who scored 24 points, all from behind the arc. She would only miss her final attempt, going eight of nine on the game.

113.JPG
Coach Jason Flowers draws up a play during a timeout. Photo credit: Roberto Cisneros

“We got to be a much better team on the defensive end,” said head coach Jason Flowers. “So we’ll go back to work tomorrow and try and get that there.”

Facing a 59-51 deficit in the fourth, Northridge caught fire and went on a 13-0 run.

The run was led by senior guard Serafina Maulupe, who scored 14 of her 16 points in the second half, including two big 3-pointers which gave the Matadors the lead.

“Its all about confidence,” Maulupe said. “Just coming out there, doing my job and doing what I got to do to help the team.”

Senior center Channon Fluker led the team for the second straight game. Fluker played only 23 minutes but scored 18 points. She also managed to pull down 17 rebounds, matching her season-high, including seven offensive boards, while recording a season-high six blocks as well.

Maulupe was matched in points by CSUN forward De’Jionae Calloway who registered her first double-double of the year, grabbing 13 rebounds to go along with her 16 points.