Mental health strike against Kaiser Permanente

National Union of Healthcare Workers, others picketed for more mental health resource allocation

Across California, the fight for mental health rights picked up momentum as psychologists, therapists, nurses and teachers began a five-day strike against Kaiser Permanente. Strikers demanded for more resource allocation for mental health services.

Ken Rogers, a psychologist at Kaiser Permanente in Elk Grove as well as a shop steward for the National Union of Healthcare Workers, explained the main reasons for the strike.

“The mental health strike is kind of an extension of the contract bargaining where we had a concern with the amount of access time for new patients and return patients for treatment with the employer,” Rogers said. “Although Kaiser has made a number of improvements in this direction, patient care — especially return access for care —  is still pushed out for some providers for five, six, even eight weeks. And when I talk about return access, I mean the patient has come in for services and all the sessions that are after that initial appointment. We’ve been bargaining with the employer since June, and they have not responded meaningfully, and we felt like we needed to strike to push the issue.”

Michelle Gaskill-Hames, the chief nurse executive for Kaiser Permanente in Northern California, gave a different perspective in that she felt the strike had unfortunate timing and posed a risk for patients during the holidays.

“This strike was unnecessary, and poorly timed, coming during the holiday season when many of our patients with mental health needs were seeking care,” Gaskill-Hames said via email. “It needlessly put our patients in the middle of the union’s contract demands, which is especially disheartening because the union’s principal demands at the bargaining table have not been about improving care and access. Rather, the union leadership is seeking even higher wages and benefits and demanding operational changes that would reduce the availability of mental health care for our patients.”

Fourth-year psychology major Michelle Melton countered the idea that the union wanted solely higher wages.

“One thing that instigated me wanting this to be looked at was because Kaiser was doing [public relations] about the strike saying that clinicians wanted more money and that they were putting patient health care at risk when really, I know a lot of clinicians who were on strike who were doing it to help their clients,” Melton said. “And so what my hope is that the community needs to be more aware because this is a social justice issue, considering that the majority of Kaiser patients were low income and working families that can’t afford Kaiser.”

Nevertheless, Gaskill-Hames confirmed that Kaiser Permanente has value for the unions and workers, wanting the best for patients as well.

“We are pleased that the union’s leadership has agreed to return to the bargaining table,” Gaskill-Hames said via email. “We are prepared to reach a responsible new contract agreement and are confident that with active engagement on both sides, we will be successful. We value our therapists and are calling on them to urge their union leadership to bargain constructively and stop putting our patients in the middle of contract demands. It’s just not right to disrupt their care.”

Susan Whitney, a psychiatric social worker at Kaiser Permanente and union steward for NUHW, contended how discouraged she was during the bargaining.

“It’s been extremely frustrating,” Whitney said. “When I go to a bargaining session, I’m not paid for that — it’s on my own time. I drove from Bakersfield to Orange County, and there was nothing new presented at the bargaining table.”

Whitney emphasized the importance of the sessions, as they are crucial for patient care.

“We had a bargaining session today, and it was rather disappointing because the message we got in bargaining was not the same as what they put out to media during the strike which was that they really value and want to work with us,” Whitney said. “They are refusing to respond to our demands to address the patient care issues other than saying that the committee — that has already been set up and has been going on for years and years and years — will have a discussion and make recommendations. I think when you have situations where people do not have needed medical and mental health care, then there needs to be a little more urgency when addressing the problem.”

Rogers also participated in the strike and he brought up another issue regarding working conditions in addition to a need for better patient care.

“We’re hoping that Kaiser will take patient care issues more seriously in terms of improving return access,” Rogers said. “There’s also the issue of working conditions for employees. We often have to use time outside of what we’re provided to provide care — booking into lunch appointments and times where you don’t even work to provide an adequate level of care for patients.”

Melton has had experience with Kaiser’s mental health services and praised their clinicians. The one drawback for her, however, was that she could not readily access them on her own time.

“My experience at Kaiser with the clinicians I had was phenomenal — that’s the reason why I stayed at Kaiser,” Melton said. “The only drawback with Kaiser is that they’re only able to be seen out of six to eight weeks. If something pops up and you need to be seen sooner than later, [then] that’s not really going to happen because their schedules are impacted so you’re not going to be able to see them and you have to go with their system.”

Gaskill-Hames acknowledged that Kaiser Permanente has the utmost quality in care programs.

“Alongside our therapists, Kaiser Permanente has been on a path to be the best mental health and addiction care program in the nation,” Gaskill-Hames said via email. “The quality of the care we provide has been recognized by the state’s Office of the Patient Advocate, and by national quality organizations. We don’t think there is any other organization that is doing more than we are to make mental health care better in the United States. We are committed to doing even more, to innovate, to advance care, and to continually seek to improve what we do.”

Though Kaiser Permanente’s services are at a renowned quality, Melton remembered how she had trouble gaining access to care.

“This past summer, I had a family member die and I was in a car accident and I was going through a lot while going to grad school,” Melton said. “I really needed help with some things. Because I had Kaiser insurance, I wasn’t able to be seen at UC Davis to receive any assistance because they are like well, you have Kaiser insurance so we can’t really help you, but then I wasn’t able to see anyone at Kaiser because you are only able to be seen out of six to eight weeks.”

Whitney clarified that strikers like herself are fighting for patient rights, and they wanted more awareness brought to how patients can access mental health care.

“This is really about patient care,” Whitney said. “Our patients understand because they have the same concerns that we do. We have had patients reach out to us and to the media. I believe that at this point, we have over 750 different stories of people reaching out to us wanting to tell their story or to ask for help or assistance to solve the problems they have with getting mental health care.”

Written by: Stella Tran — city@theaggie.org

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Virtual becomes reality for Southern Indiana

Virtual becomes reality for Southern Indiana as Dimension 4 VR Arcade offers a premier virtual reality experience to the local area. With eleven virtual reality stations, rooms are rented out by the hour with a wide variety of games.

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Lady Bears Defend the Den Heading into Conference Play

The University of Northern Colorado Bears Women’s basketball team have shown true grit in a tough non-conference schedule.

UNC’s Lady Bears came out of non-conference competition with a 5-4 record.

For Jenny Huth and her ladies to only have four losses is a good statement about what they can bring to conference play.

Their only losses were to CU, LSU, Air Force and BYU.

Each loss was on the road and to a much larger school than UNC coming from tough power/ high-major conferences.

The road schedule was not kind to the Lady Bears, but notable wins at CSU and San Francisco helped establish they are able to win away from Greeley.

While the Lady Bears sit at 2-4 for their road record, they have been able to post an impressive 5-0 record at home against formidable opponents.

Denver, Southern Methodist and Chattanooga all fell victim to Savannah Smith and company before the Christmas break.

In the early stage of conference play the Lady Bears are 2-0 after decisive wins over Sacramento and Portland State.

Photo provided via Ben Schleiger

New Year, Different Bears

This time last year the Lady Bears were 10-3.

Is it time to worry that the gaps last year’s seniors left could hurt the Bears?

No. The winning margin is less and the BYU and LSU games were losses this year.

But, it has to be taken into account that those were road games in tough environments and there are other games to be proud of.

Last year, CSU won by 11 in Greeley, but this year UNC won by 6 in Fort Collins.

UNC also beat Denver for the third year in a row, even with UNC transfer Courtney Smith on their side.

And while the LSU game was a defeat in Louisiana, the Bears lost by only five points to a power conference SEC team.

It is apparent that Savannah Smith is the leader and hero of the team without Savannah Scott and Kianna Williams.

This year the Bears are younger and guided by first-time head coach Jenny Huth via UCLA, but success still seems to be a part of the program.

Heading into conference play the contribution from young, rising stars Alexis Chapman and Micayla Isenbart could be the key to relieving pressure from Savannah Smith and continuing to win games.

Alexis Chapman scores 23 in overtime win over Chattanooga. Photo provided via UNC Athletics

Looking at the Numbers

A 2-0 start to conference play seems encouraging, but what do the numbers say.

The team scoring has been anchored by Senior Savannah Smith (168), Sophomore Alexis Chapman (143) and Freshmen Micayla Isenbart (104).

In conference play the Lady Bears will have to continue to spread the ball around since the Big Sky already knows how dangerous Smith can be.

The rest of the numbers are good averages, but all have positive room to grow.

What should be concerning to the Lady Bear is their free throws and turnovers.

Free throws are the “easy points” for a team since they are practiced so often and no one is guarding during them.

A 63 percent average is a dangerously low number to have in tight games.

The other concern is the turnovers per game average 16.

That is 16 times the other team has another chance to catch up or extend the lead.

These concerns are shown in the points by quarter below where UNC’s points forced and allowed average to be even at halftime.

It gets worse by having slow starts in third quarter according to the total numbers.

Being the “comeback kids” in the fourth quarter is exciting, but if the problems are remedied then the Lady Bears can defend their title well in conference play.

Team Average
PPG: 65.0
FG %: 38.9
3PT %: 32.4
FT %: 63.7
RB: 41.0
AST: 12.2
TO: 16.3
STL: 7.2
BLK: 2.0

Points Scored by Quarter
Q1
UNC: 191
Opp: 148
Q2
UNC: 148
Opp: 191
Q3
UNC: 172
Opp: 180
Q4
UNC: 195
Opp: 183
OT
UNC: 9
Opp: 6

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Non-conference no more: Grading the Racers through 11 games

Story by Blake Sandlin

Sports Editor

bsandlin1@murraystate.edu

It seems premature, but we’ve finally reached the first major checkpoint for any college basketball program with the conclusion of non-conference play.

For Murray State’s men’s basketball team, reaching that milestone with a 9-2 mark means there’s plenty to be excited about, but as Head Coach Matt McMahon is quick to remark, it hasn’t been easy, and there’s still plenty of season left to be played.

“I think we have a great bunch of guys who are committed to each other,” McMahon said. “They’re about the right things; they love Murray State…[9-2] is a solid record, but it hasn’t been easy either. It hasn’t been smooth sailing. We’ve dealt with some adversity…There have been plenty of challenges along the way, but I think our guys have handled those in the right way, and we’re just moving it forward.”

Eleven games, 783 points and a slew of highlight reel caliber plays later, the Racers have shown few signs of deceleration from the thrilling style that landed them in the NCAA tournament last season.

Admittedly, there are obvious flaws from a year ago that have caused Murray State to stumble at times against more formidable opponents, but those flaws have not been so pronounced as to cause the team to completely fall flat as it approaches the portion of its schedule that bares the heaviest post-season implications.

So before any of those games are played, I’ll take a look at how the Racers have fared to this point and grade those areas accordingly.

(Blake Sandlin/TheNews)

Offense: B

Strengths: Transition offense, ball movement

Weaknesses: Turnovers, Reliable post presence

Maybe it’s trivial to nitpick the Racer offense given their 9-2 record. In fact, they have won all of the non-conference games they were expected to win, and even stolen a few where they weren’t – Missouri State and Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.

Nevertheless, there are several areas where Murray State has struggled thus far. The first, and probably the most pressing at this moment, is the team’s lack of a reliable big man. The loss of senior forward Anthony Smith obviously threw a wrench into the Racers’ game plan early, leaving them to experiment on the fly with players like forwards Darnell Cowart and KJ Williams.

Both have shown flashes of promise as of late, Cowart especially in his 13-point, four-steal showing at Auburn University, and Williams with his 16-point, five-rebound night against Bethel University. The key to both players is consistency, as each have struggled to establish a rhythm offensively on a sustained basis.

I don’t believe the Racers necessarily need a big man to carry them – they have Morant for that. What they do need, however, is a player who can serve as a confident, reliable finisher when Morant is facing double teams, and someone who can pick up the rebounding load. It will be interesting to see how the coaching staff handles Williams and Cowart’s minutes going forward.

The turnover totals for the Racers has prompted some concern to this point, with the team averaging 13 a game. In the first three DI games of the season, Murray State averaged 18 turnovers per game (10 against Spalding University). Since those games, the Racers have trimmed that number down to 11.5 turnovers per game, less than the 12 the team averaged last season en route to an OVC Championship.

Much of that improvement can be attributed to the improved decision making of Morant. After a season high of 10 turnovers against Alabama and two games of seven turnovers before that, Morant has gone on to average just 3.8 in the seven games after. The Racers’ sloppiness with the ball appears to be trending downwards.

These weaknesses haven’t overshadowed how effective the Racers have been in transition this year. It seems like every game the Racers record some sort of acrobatic marvel on a fast break, and the probability of seeing an alley-oop connection between senior guard Shaq Buchanan and Morant is practically a certainty. This is a strength that will carry the Racers through conference play.

As is expected when you have the country’s leader in assists per game in Morant (9.6 apg), passing the basketball is a pivotal fixture in the Racers’ offense. Morant commands heavy pressure as a result of his offensive ability, which allows him to find his teammates.

That strength has radiated to his teammates as well, as defensive breakdowns that come as a result of Morant’s unreal vision allows for an unselfish Murray State team to easily find the open man. The Racers are ranked 23rd in the country in total assists, averaging 17.4 per game. Interestingly enough, one of the 22 teams better is Belmont, whose 20.9 assists per game ranks third in the country.

(Blake Sandlin/TheNews)

Defense: A

Strengths: Shot-blocking, perimeter defense

Weaknesses: Defensive rebounding

If there’s been a calling card for the Racers through their non-conference play, it’s resoundingly been their effort on defense. Piggybacking off a stellar defense last season, the Racers haven’t lost a step, as they’ve ranked as high as No. 5 in the country in scoring defense by giving up just 57.3 ppg to opponents.

One area that seems to tell the story of Murray State’s defensive success is the team’s ability to defend the 3-point shot. Last year’s Racer team found themselves among the top teams in this category last season, so it appears their perimeter defensive prowess this year likely reflects a larger trend in McMahon’s coaching philosophy that revolves around neutralizing the 3-pointer first and foremost.

Murray State is currently ranked No. 3 in the country in 3-point field goal defense, holding opponents to just 24.9 percent from beyond the arc.

No team other than Auburn (The SEC’s best 3-point shooting team) managed to make the Racers pay from deep, and Murray State’s remarkable ability to hold talented Missouri Valley teams like Missouri State and SIU to just four triples combined should serve as a powerful testament to how good Murray State can be when they hone in on defending the three.

You thought the Racers only excelled at defending the perimeter? Think again. One of the bigger, and perhaps most underrated aspects of this Murray State team is its aptitude for interior defense. Led by seniors Brion Sanchious and Shaq Buchanan, the Racers currently lead the OVC and are tied for 13th in the country in blocks per game (5.6).

While Sanchious certainly isn’t lauded for his offensive talents, he is doing the dirty work on the defensive end and is the spark plug in the starting rotation that allows for all of the highlight plays you see on the other end.

With 13 blocks this year, Sanchious is averaging 1.2 per contest, with Buchanan following shortly behind with an average of 0.9. Keep in mind, all of this is being done without the services of senior forward Anthony Smith, who was averaging more than 1.5 blocks per game before suffering an ankle injury.

These efforts reflect why Murray State holds opponents to just 62.8 ppg, and explain the impressive 9-2 start they’ve jumped off to.

For all the effort the Racers have undertaken to prevent their opponents from scoring, there is still work to be done. The biggest weakness right now for the Racers is their effort on the defensive glass.

The Racers’ top-three leading rebounders are all guards, and while the coaching staff would certainly have no qualms about sharing the rebounding load, it paints a bigger picture of the absence of a productive and consistent post rebounder.

Whether that be the role of junior forward Darnell Cowart or freshman forward KJ Williams, who are each progressively seeing more minutes, I think the Racers need someone to step into that role going forward.

At 26.8 defensive rebounds per game, Murray State is ranked fifth in the OVC in defensive rebounding, and even lower on the offensive rebounding side.

No team is perfect, but even McMahon noted that some of these improvements are imperative in order for his team to grow as they approach their first conference game against Morehead State at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 3, at the CFSB Center.

“Areas of improvement I think are obvious,” McMahon said. “Turnover rate, I think we’ve made some improvements there, but still room for growth. I think the defensive rebounding is an area we really have to be better at, and then overall execution in all areas of the game.”

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Mardi Gras King Cake ice cream hits store freezers across the South

There’s no plastic baby inside but the Mardi Gras King Cake ice cream flavor from Blue Bell packs the taste of the carnival season into a half gallon.

The New Orleans-inspired frozen treat is, “cinnamon cake flavored ice cream with tasty pastry pieces, a colorful green cream cheese swirl and festive candy sprinkles,” according to Jenny Van Dorf, public relations manager for Blue Bell.

The flavor has been a favorite among the areas that celebrate the Mardi Gras holiday since 2012, but this year marks the first time the company is making the ice cream available outside of New Orleans and Alabama.

The ice cream will be available across all areas that sell Blue Bell products after last year’s high demand.

“Last year a grocery store in Louisiana posted about the flavor’s arrival on its Facebook page and we started receiving requests from all over the country,” Carl Breed, corporate sales manager for Blue Bell, said. “After that, we decided to share this festive flavor with everyone in our distribution area.”

The Mardi Gras King Cake flavor is not the first time the company created a carnival concoction. Blue Bell released the Mardi Gras flavor in 2004 and the King Cake flavor in 2006.

Despite the flavors being discontinued, they both still live on in a way, as the Mardi Gras King Cake flavor is simply a combination of the two older flavors.

“We still receive requests for Mardi Gras and King Cake because our fans never forget a flavor,” Breed said. “But, you have the best of both worlds with our Mardi Gras King Cake Ice Cream.”

The carnival flavor hits store freezers on Jan. 2 and will only be available for a limited time.

The post Mardi Gras King Cake ice cream hits store freezers across the South appeared first on The Maroon.

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Mardi Gras King Cake ice cream hits store freezers across the South

There’s no plastic baby inside but the Mardi Gras King Cake ice cream flavor from Blue Bell packs the taste of the carnival season into a half gallon.

The New Orleans-inspired frozen treat is, “cinnamon cake flavored ice cream with tasty pastry pieces, a colorful green cream cheese swirl and festive candy sprinkles,” according to Jenny Van Dorf, public relations manager for Blue Bell.

The flavor has been a favorite among the areas that celebrate the Mardi Gras holiday since 2012, but this year marks the first time the company is making the ice cream available outside of New Orleans and Alabama.

The ice cream will be available across all areas that sell Blue Bell products after last year’s high demand.

“Last year a grocery store in Louisiana posted about the flavor’s arrival on its Facebook page and we started receiving requests from all over the country,” Carl Breed, corporate sales manager for Blue Bell, said. “After that, we decided to share this festive flavor with everyone in our distribution area.”

The Mardi Gras King Cake flavor is not the first time the company created a carnival concoction. Blue Bell released the Mardi Gras flavor in 2004 and the King Cake flavor in 2006.

Despite the flavors being discontinued, they both still live on in a way, as the Mardi Gras King Cake flavor is simply a combination of the two older flavors.

“We still receive requests for Mardi Gras and King Cake because our fans never forget a flavor,” Breed said. “But, you have the best of both worlds with our Mardi Gras King Cake Ice Cream.”

The carnival flavor hits store freezers on Jan. 2 and will only be available for a limited time.

The post Mardi Gras King Cake ice cream hits store freezers across the South appeared first on The Maroon.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Non-conference no more: Grading the Racers through 11 games

Story by Blake Sandlin

Sports Editor

bsandlin1@murraystate.edu

It seems premature, but we’ve finally reached the first major checkpoint for any college basketball program with the conclusion of non-conference play.

For Murray State’s men’s basketball team, reaching that milestone with a 9-2 mark means there’s plenty to be excited about, but as Head Coach Matt McMahon is quick to remark, it hasn’t been easy, and there’s still plenty of season left to be played.

“I think we have a great bunch of guys who are committed to each other,” McMahon said. “They’re about the right things; they love Murray State…[9-2] is a solid record, but it hasn’t been easy either. It hasn’t been smooth sailing. We’ve dealt with some adversity…There have been plenty of challenges along the way, but I think our guys have handled those in the right way, and we’re just moving it forward.”

Eleven games, 783 points and a slew of highlight reel caliber plays later, the Racers have shown few signs of deceleration from the thrilling style that landed them in the NCAA tournament last season.

Admittedly, there are obvious flaws from a year ago that have caused Murray State to stumble at times against more formidable opponents, but those flaws have not been so pronounced as to cause the team to completely fall flat as it approaches the portion of its schedule that bares the heaviest post-season implications.

So before any of those games are played, I’ll take a look at how the Racers have fared to this point and grade those areas accordingly.

(Blake Sandlin/TheNews)

Offense: B

Strengths: Transition offense, ball movement

Weaknesses: Turnovers, Reliable post presence

Maybe it’s trivial to nitpick the Racer offense given their 9-2 record. In fact, they have won all of the non-conference games they were expected to win, and even stolen a few where they weren’t – Missouri State and Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.

Nevertheless, there are several areas where Murray State has struggled thus far. The first, and probably the most pressing at this moment, is the team’s lack of a reliable big man. The loss of senior forward Anthony Smith obviously threw a wrench into the Racers’ game plan early, leaving them to experiment on the fly with players like forwards Darnell Cowart and KJ Williams.

Both have shown flashes of promise as of late, Cowart especially in his 13-point, four-steal showing at Auburn University, and Williams with his 16-point, five-rebound night against Bethel University. The key to both players is consistency, as each have struggled to establish a rhythm offensively on a sustained basis.

I don’t believe the Racers necessarily need a big man to carry them – they have Morant for that. What they do need, however, is a player who can serve as a confident, reliable finisher when Morant is facing double teams, and someone who can pick up the rebounding load. It will be interesting to see how the coaching staff handles Williams and Cowart’s minutes going forward.

The turnover totals for the Racers has prompted some concern to this point, with the team averaging 13 a game. In the first three DI games of the season, Murray State averaged 18 turnovers per game (10 against Spalding University). Since those games, the Racers have trimmed that number down to 11.5 turnovers per game, less than the 12 the team averaged last season en route to an OVC Championship.

Much of that improvement can be attributed to the improved decision making of Morant. After a season high of 10 turnovers against Alabama and two games of seven turnovers before that, Morant has gone on to average just 3.8 in the seven games after. The Racers’ sloppiness with the ball appears to be trending downwards.

These weaknesses haven’t overshadowed how effective the Racers have been in transition this year. It seems like every game the Racers record some sort of acrobatic marvel on a fast break, and the probability of seeing an alley-oop connection between senior guard Shaq Buchanan and Morant is practically a certainty. This is a strength that will carry the Racers through conference play.

As is expected when you have the country’s leader in assists per game in Morant (9.6 apg), passing the basketball is a pivotal fixture in the Racers’ offense. Morant commands heavy pressure as a result of his offensive ability, which allows him to find his teammates.

That strength has radiated to his teammates as well, as defensive breakdowns that come as a result of Morant’s unreal vision allows for an unselfish Murray State team to easily find the open man. The Racers are ranked 23rd in the country in total assists, averaging 17.4 per game. Interestingly enough, one of the 22 teams better is Belmont, whose 20.9 assists per game ranks third in the country.

(Blake Sandlin/TheNews)

Defense: A

Strengths: Shot-blocking, perimeter defense

Weaknesses: Defensive rebounding

If there’s been a calling card for the Racers through their non-conference play, it’s resoundingly been their effort on defense. Piggybacking off a stellar defense last season, the Racers haven’t lost a step, as they’ve ranked as high as No. 5 in the country in scoring defense by giving up just 57.3 ppg to opponents.

One area that seems to tell the story of Murray State’s defensive success is the team’s ability to defend the 3-point shot. Last year’s Racer team found themselves among the top teams in this category last season, so it appears their perimeter defensive prowess this year likely reflects a larger trend in McMahon’s coaching philosophy that revolves around neutralizing the 3-pointer first and foremost.

Murray State is currently ranked No. 3 in the country in 3-point field goal defense, holding opponents to just 24.9 percent from beyond the arc.

No team other than Auburn (The SEC’s best 3-point shooting team) managed to make the Racers pay from deep, and Murray State’s remarkable ability to hold talented Missouri Valley teams like Missouri State and SIU to just four triples combined should serve as a powerful testament to how good Murray State can be when they hone in on defending the three.

You thought the Racers only excelled at defending the perimeter? Think again. One of the bigger, and perhaps most underrated aspects of this Murray State team is its aptitude for interior defense. Led by seniors Brion Sanchious and Shaq Buchanan, the Racers currently lead the OVC and are tied for 13th in the country in blocks per game (5.6).

While Sanchious certainly isn’t lauded for his offensive talents, he is doing the dirty work on the defensive end and is the spark plug in the starting rotation that allows for all of the highlight plays you see on the other end.

With 13 blocks this year, Sanchious is averaging 1.2 per contest, with Buchanan following shortly behind with an average of 0.9. Keep in mind, all of this is being done without the services of senior forward Anthony Smith, who was averaging more than 1.5 blocks per game before suffering an ankle injury.

These efforts reflect why Murray State holds opponents to just 62.8 ppg, and explain the impressive 9-2 start they’ve jumped off to.

For all the effort the Racers have undertaken to prevent their opponents from scoring, there is still work to be done. The biggest weakness right now for the Racers is their effort on the defensive glass.

The Racers’ top-three leading rebounders are all guards, and while the coaching staff would certainly have no qualms about sharing the rebounding load, it paints a bigger picture of the absence of a productive and consistent post rebounder.

Whether that be the role of junior forward Darnell Cowart or freshman forward KJ Williams, who are each progressively seeing more minutes, I think the Racers need someone to step into that role going forward.

At 26.8 defensive rebounds per game, Murray State is ranked fifth in the OVC in defensive rebounding, and even lower on the offensive rebounding side.

No team is perfect, but even McMahon noted that some of these improvements are imperative in order for his team to grow as they approach their first conference game against Morehead State at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 3, at the CFSB Center.

“Areas of improvement I think are obvious,” McMahon said. “Turnover rate, I think we’ve made some improvements there, but still room for growth. I think the defensive rebounding is an area we really have to be better at, and then overall execution in all areas of the game.”

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Aztecs need second-half comeback during 65-60 victory over CSUN

San Diego State men’s basketball needed a second half surge to emerge victorious over Cal State Northridge, 65-60, on New Year’s Day at Viejas Arena.

SDSU (8-5) trailed by 19 points with just over 15 minutes to play, but ended the game on a 38-14 run, including a 7-0 run in the final two minutes, to secure the win over its Big West opponent.

“The team showed its grit,” head coach Brian Dutcher said. “They bowed their back, fought through frustration, they believed in themselves and came out with a hard fought victory.”

CSUN (6-9) was leading 60-58 with 2:12 remaining, before senior guard Jeremy Hemsley knocked down a three pointer to give the Aztecs the lead with 1:57 to play.

The Matadors, who shot 29 percent in the second half and made only one of their final eight shots, would not score again, while SDSU iced the game with a layup and two free throws from senior guard Devin Watson.

Hemsley and Watson finished with 13 and 14 points, respectively, after both got out to slow starts in the first half.

Watson, the Aztecs leading scorer coming into the game, began 0-for-7 from the field and made his first shot with 5:34 to play before the half, while Hemsley scored his first points with just over two minutes to go before intermission.  

Hemsley said the team finally found its rhythm in the second half.   

“We weren’t really dwelling on the slow start we had,” Hemsley said. “We just look forward to what we could do better in the next half.”

The Aztecs were led on offense by sophomore forward Jalen McDaniels, who scored the first seven points of the game and finished with a team high 20 points and 13 rebounds, for his second double-double of the season.

McDaniels made five of the Aztecs nine field goals in the first half, and had scored half of the team’s points with SDSU trailing 47-32 with 11:59 to play.

“I told Jalen that was his best game of the year,” Dutcher said. “Jalen’s a high motor, so he’s usually going fast, but the difference is he was able to slow down.”

The Aztecs trailed 32-21 at halftime, after shooting only 28 percent from the field, including just 2-for-15 from behind the arc.

Watson missed his first five three point attempts, but the team’s leading scorer coming into the game said he’ll never stop shooting.

“I’m never going to lose my confidence,” Watson said. “My teammates believe in me as well as my coaches.”

SDSU’s deficit ballooned to 19 points following a 7-0 run by the Matadors with 15:12 to play in the game.

Freshman forward Lamine Diane finished with 23 points and 14 rebounds to lead CSUN, but was forced to the bench with his fourth foul with 8:36 to play in the game.

The Aztecs trailed by seven when Diane went out, but went on a 9-2 run to tie the game at 53 before he returned to the floor with just over five minutes left.

SDSU will now head to Boise, Idaho on Jan. 5 to take on Boise State for the Aztecs first game of Mountain West Conference play.

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Men’s basketball overpowered by No. 2 Michigan

When the lowly, mid-major Binghamton Bearcats took to the floor against the powerhouse No. 2 Michigan Wolverines, a competitive game was almost out of the question. Yet that is exactly what occurred for the first 30 minutes on Sunday afternoon, as the Bearcats (4-10) went toe-to-toe with Michigan (13-0), keeping the game close. Only a late run in the final minutes allowed the Wolverines to widen the gap, ultimately winning the game 74-52 in Ann Arbor.

For the majority of the game, the contest was much tighter than the final score suggested. Until the final 10 minutes of play, the largest lead Michigan managed to put together against the Bearcats was seven points, with the margin often being even closer than that.

“We played really hard,” said BU head coach Tommy Dempsey, per bubearcats.com. “I thought we kept them off balance and did everything we could to hang in there and give ourselves a chance to win.”

At the start of the game, the Wolverines knocked down three quick shots from downtown to take a 9-3 lead, and it seemed as if Michigan’s proficiency from 3-point range in recent games would contribute to a high-scoring performance.

But after that, the shots stopped falling so easily for the Maize and Blue. The Bearcats forced Michigan into settling for mid-range jumpers. Many of the looks were open, but the Wolverines could not get them to fall. The lack of offense from Michigan allowed the Bearcats to slowly claw their way back into the game. Senior forward Caleb Stewart led Binghamton’s offensive charge at this juncture, and a deep, elbow 3-pointer capped 7-0 run to put the Bearcats up 10-9.

The remainder of the half was a sloppy, low-scoring affair. Both teams shot poorly from the floor; only sophomore guard Jordan Poole’s success from beyond the arc kept Michigan ahead of Binghamton for most of the half, while Stewart and graduate student forward Chancellor Barnard accounted for the majority of Binghamton’s points in the half. The Wolverines were up by just five at the break, with both teams shooting 44 percent from the field.

The start of the second half continued in much the same way that the first half ended. Binghamton continued to play a scrappy game, forcing missed shots and blocking a couple of attempts, but the Bearcats failed to capitalize on Michigan’s stunted offense. The Wolverines entered the day as the top-five in the country in scoring defense, and that prowess asserted itself, resulting in Binghamton turnovers and few Bearcat points. With Michigan’s defense keeping Binghamton from pulling ahead, it was only a matter of time before that Wolverine offense got hot.

Binghamton was within three as late as the 11-minute mark, but then the mid-range jumper that Michigan had such trouble with finally started to fall. Freshman forward Iggy Brazdeikis and sophomore forward Isaiah Livers took over offensively, shooting 11 of Michigan’s 16 field goals in the half, combining for 25 of 40 total second-half points.

“As fatigue set in late in the game the bigger and stronger team enforced their will and we didn’t have a lot of answers in the last six or seven minutes,” Dempsey said.

In total, Michigan ended the game on a 28-9 run to win by a sizable, 22-point margin. Brazdeikis led all scorers with 21 points, while Barnard led the Bearcats with 14. Noticeably quiet in this matchup were Binghamton’s two most prolific scorers, freshman guard Sam Sessoms and graduate student guard J.C. Show, both of whom shot dismally from the floor. In the end, Binghamton gave the home team more of a challenge than most people expected, but Michigan eventually proved too much to handle.

“That’s a team that can win the national championship,” Dempsey said. “They have the size and the defensive DNA and they are undefeated for a reason.”

Binghamton’s first game of 2019 will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 2, when the Bearcats take on Columbia at home. Tipoff is slated for 7 p.m. from the Events Center in Vestal, New York.

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Men’s basketball overpowered by No. 2 Michigan

When the lowly, mid-major Binghamton Bearcats took to the floor against the powerhouse No. 2 Michigan Wolverines, a competitive game was almost out of the question. Yet that is exactly what occurred for the first 30 minutes on Sunday afternoon, as the Bearcats (4-10) went toe-to-toe with Michigan (13-0), keeping the game close. Only a late run in the final minutes allowed the Wolverines to widen the gap, ultimately winning the game 74-52 in Ann Arbor.

For the majority of the game, the contest was much tighter than the final score suggested. Until the final 10 minutes of play, the largest lead Michigan managed to put together against the Bearcats was seven points, with the margin often being even closer than that.

“We played really hard,” said BU head coach Tommy Dempsey, per bubearcats.com. “I thought we kept them off balance and did everything we could to hang in there and give ourselves a chance to win.”

At the start of the game, the Wolverines knocked down three quick shots from downtown to take a 9-3 lead, and it seemed as if Michigan’s proficiency from 3-point range in recent games would contribute to a high-scoring performance.

But after that, the shots stopped falling so easily for the Maize and Blue. The Bearcats forced Michigan into settling for mid-range jumpers. Many of the looks were open, but the Wolverines could not get them to fall. The lack of offense from Michigan allowed the Bearcats to slowly claw their way back into the game. Senior forward Caleb Stewart led Binghamton’s offensive charge at this juncture, and a deep, elbow 3-pointer capped 7-0 run to put the Bearcats up 10-9.

The remainder of the half was a sloppy, low-scoring affair. Both teams shot poorly from the floor; only sophomore guard Jordan Poole’s success from beyond the arc kept Michigan ahead of Binghamton for most of the half, while Stewart and graduate student forward Chancellor Barnard accounted for the majority of Binghamton’s points in the half. The Wolverines were up by just five at the break, with both teams shooting 44 percent from the field.

The start of the second half continued in much the same way that the first half ended. Binghamton continued to play a scrappy game, forcing missed shots and blocking a couple of attempts, but the Bearcats failed to capitalize on Michigan’s stunted offense. The Wolverines entered the day as the top-five in the country in scoring defense, and that prowess asserted itself, resulting in Binghamton turnovers and few Bearcat points. With Michigan’s defense keeping Binghamton from pulling ahead, it was only a matter of time before that Wolverine offense got hot.

Binghamton was within three as late as the 11-minute mark, but then the mid-range jumper that Michigan had such trouble with finally started to fall. Freshman forward Iggy Brazdeikis and sophomore forward Isaiah Livers took over offensively, shooting 11 of Michigan’s 16 field goals in the half, combining for 25 of 40 total second-half points.

“As fatigue set in late in the game the bigger and stronger team enforced their will and we didn’t have a lot of answers in the last six or seven minutes,” Dempsey said.

In total, Michigan ended the game on a 28-9 run to win by a sizable, 22-point margin. Brazdeikis led all scorers with 21 points, while Barnard led the Bearcats with 14. Noticeably quiet in this matchup were Binghamton’s two most prolific scorers, freshman guard Sam Sessoms and graduate student guard J.C. Show, both of whom shot dismally from the floor. In the end, Binghamton gave the home team more of a challenge than most people expected, but Michigan eventually proved too much to handle.

“That’s a team that can win the national championship,” Dempsey said. “They have the size and the defensive DNA and they are undefeated for a reason.”

Binghamton’s first game of 2019 will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 2, when the Bearcats take on Columbia at home. Tipoff is slated for 7 p.m. from the Events Center in Vestal, New York.

***

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Men’s basketball overpowered by No. 2 Michigan

When the lowly, mid-major Binghamton Bearcats took to the floor against the powerhouse No. 2 Michigan Wolverines, a competitive game was almost out of the question. Yet that is exactly what occurred for the first 30 minutes on Sunday afternoon, as the Bearcats (4-10) went toe-to-toe with Michigan (13-0), keeping the game close. Only a late run in the final minutes allowed the Wolverines to widen the gap, ultimately winning the game 74-52 in Ann Arbor.

For the majority of the game, the contest was much tighter than the final score suggested. Until the final 10 minutes of play, the largest lead Michigan managed to put together against the Bearcats was seven points, with the margin often being even closer than that.

“We played really hard,” said BU head coach Tommy Dempsey, per bubearcats.com. “I thought we kept them off balance and did everything we could to hang in there and give ourselves a chance to win.”

At the start of the game, the Wolverines knocked down three quick shots from downtown to take a 9-3 lead, and it seemed as if Michigan’s proficiency from 3-point range in recent games would contribute to a high-scoring performance.

But after that, the shots stopped falling so easily for the Maize and Blue. The Bearcats forced Michigan into settling for mid-range jumpers. Many of the looks were open, but the Wolverines could not get them to fall. The lack of offense from Michigan allowed the Bearcats to slowly claw their way back into the game. Senior forward Caleb Stewart led Binghamton’s offensive charge at this juncture, and a deep, elbow 3-pointer capped 7-0 run to put the Bearcats up 10-9.

The remainder of the half was a sloppy, low-scoring affair. Both teams shot poorly from the floor; only sophomore guard Jordan Poole’s success from beyond the arc kept Michigan ahead of Binghamton for most of the half, while Stewart and graduate student forward Chancellor Barnard accounted for the majority of Binghamton’s points in the half. The Wolverines were up by just five at the break, with both teams shooting 44 percent from the field.

The start of the second half continued in much the same way that the first half ended. Binghamton continued to play a scrappy game, forcing missed shots and blocking a couple of attempts, but the Bearcats failed to capitalize on Michigan’s stunted offense. The Wolverines entered the day as the top-five in the country in scoring defense, and that prowess asserted itself, resulting in Binghamton turnovers and few Bearcat points. With Michigan’s defense keeping Binghamton from pulling ahead, it was only a matter of time before that Wolverine offense got hot.

Binghamton was within three as late as the 11-minute mark, but then the mid-range jumper that Michigan had such trouble with finally started to fall. Freshman forward Iggy Brazdeikis and sophomore forward Isaiah Livers took over offensively, shooting 11 of Michigan’s 16 field goals in the half, combining for 25 of 40 total second-half points.

“As fatigue set in late in the game the bigger and stronger team enforced their will and we didn’t have a lot of answers in the last six or seven minutes,” Dempsey said.

In total, Michigan ended the game on a 28-9 run to win by a sizable, 22-point margin. Brazdeikis led all scorers with 21 points, while Barnard led the Bearcats with 14. Noticeably quiet in this matchup were Binghamton’s two most prolific scorers, freshman guard Sam Sessoms and graduate student guard J.C. Show, both of whom shot dismally from the floor. In the end, Binghamton gave the home team more of a challenge than most people expected, but Michigan eventually proved too much to handle.

“That’s a team that can win the national championship,” Dempsey said. “They have the size and the defensive DNA and they are undefeated for a reason.”

Binghamton’s first game of 2019 will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 2, when the Bearcats take on Columbia at home. Tipoff is slated for 7 p.m. from the Events Center in Vestal, New York.

***

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Men’s basketball overpowered by No. 2 Michigan

When the lowly, mid-major Binghamton Bearcats took to the floor against the powerhouse No. 2 Michigan Wolverines, a competitive game was almost out of the question. Yet that is exactly what occurred for the first 30 minutes on Sunday afternoon, as the Bearcats (4-10) went toe-to-toe with Michigan (13-0), keeping the game close. Only a late run in the final minutes allowed the Wolverines to widen the gap, ultimately winning the game 74-52 in Ann Arbor.

For the majority of the game, the contest was much tighter than the final score suggested. Until the final 10 minutes of play, the largest lead Michigan managed to put together against the Bearcats was seven points, with the margin often being even closer than that.

“We played really hard,” said BU head coach Tommy Dempsey, per bubearcats.com. “I thought we kept them off balance and did everything we could to hang in there and give ourselves a chance to win.”

At the start of the game, the Wolverines knocked down three quick shots from downtown to take a 9-3 lead, and it seemed as if Michigan’s proficiency from 3-point range in recent games would contribute to a high-scoring performance.

But after that, the shots stopped falling so easily for the Maize and Blue. The Bearcats forced Michigan into settling for mid-range jumpers. Many of the looks were open, but the Wolverines could not get them to fall. The lack of offense from Michigan allowed the Bearcats to slowly claw their way back into the game. Senior forward Caleb Stewart led Binghamton’s offensive charge at this juncture, and a deep, elbow 3-pointer capped 7-0 run to put the Bearcats up 10-9.

The remainder of the half was a sloppy, low-scoring affair. Both teams shot poorly from the floor; only sophomore guard Jordan Poole’s success from beyond the arc kept Michigan ahead of Binghamton for most of the half, while Stewart and graduate student forward Chancellor Barnard accounted for the majority of Binghamton’s points in the half. The Wolverines were up by just five at the break, with both teams shooting 44 percent from the field.

The start of the second half continued in much the same way that the first half ended. Binghamton continued to play a scrappy game, forcing missed shots and blocking a couple of attempts, but the Bearcats failed to capitalize on Michigan’s stunted offense. The Wolverines entered the day as the top-five in the country in scoring defense, and that prowess asserted itself, resulting in Binghamton turnovers and few Bearcat points. With Michigan’s defense keeping Binghamton from pulling ahead, it was only a matter of time before that Wolverine offense got hot.

Binghamton was within three as late as the 11-minute mark, but then the mid-range jumper that Michigan had such trouble with finally started to fall. Freshman forward Iggy Brazdeikis and sophomore forward Isaiah Livers took over offensively, shooting 11 of Michigan’s 16 field goals in the half, combining for 25 of 40 total second-half points.

“As fatigue set in late in the game the bigger and stronger team enforced their will and we didn’t have a lot of answers in the last six or seven minutes,” Dempsey said.

In total, Michigan ended the game on a 28-9 run to win by a sizable, 22-point margin. Brazdeikis led all scorers with 21 points, while Barnard led the Bearcats with 14. Noticeably quiet in this matchup were Binghamton’s two most prolific scorers, freshman guard Sam Sessoms and graduate student guard J.C. Show, both of whom shot dismally from the floor. In the end, Binghamton gave the home team more of a challenge than most people expected, but Michigan eventually proved too much to handle.

“That’s a team that can win the national championship,” Dempsey said. “They have the size and the defensive DNA and they are undefeated for a reason.”

Binghamton’s first game of 2019 will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 2, when the Bearcats take on Columbia at home. Tipoff is slated for 7 p.m. from the Events Center in Vestal, New York.

***

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Late-night shooting marks city’s 10th homicide this year

On Saturday night, a man was fatally shot on Dorman Street, marking the 10th homicide of the year in New Haven.

The gunfire activated ShotSpotter, a city-implemented technology that detects the precise location of gun fires. According to police reports obtained by WTNH, New Haven police officers responded to the ShotSpotter activation on Dorman Street at 6:58 p.m.

The male gunshot victim, identified as 44-year-old Samuel Hooks, was transported to the Yale-New Haven Hospital, where he was pronounced deceased shortly after being admitted, according to the New Haven Register.  

The incident prompted heavy police presence on Saturday night at the area of the incident, about a mile away from Southern Connecticut State University. The police returned to the scene on Sunday morning, appearing to gather more evidence, NBC Connecticut reported on Sunday.  

The investigation remains active at this point, and the New Haven Police Department has opened a request for anyone to come forward with information pertinent to the case.

New Haven saw seven homicides in 2017.

This is a breaking story. Check back for updates.

Sammy Westfall | sammy.westfall@yale.edu

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Late-night shooting marks city’s 10th homicide this year

On Saturday night, a man was fatally shot on Dorman Street, marking the 10th homicide of the year in New Haven.

The gunfire activated ShotSpotter, a city-implemented technology that detects the precise location of gun fires. According to police reports obtained by WTNH, New Haven police officers responded to the ShotSpotter activation on Dorman Street at 6:58 p.m.

The male gunshot victim, identified as 44-year-old Samuel Hooks, was transported to the Yale-New Haven Hospital, where he was pronounced deceased shortly after being admitted, according to the New Haven Register.  

The incident prompted heavy police presence on Saturday night at the area of the incident, about a mile away from Southern Connecticut State University. The police returned to the scene on Sunday morning, appearing to gather more evidence, NBC Connecticut reported on Sunday.  

The investigation remains active at this point, and the New Haven Police Department has opened a request for anyone to come forward with information pertinent to the case.

New Haven saw seven homicides in 2017.

This is a breaking story. Check back for updates.

Sammy Westfall | sammy.westfall@yale.edu

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Men’s basketball vanquishes Flames at BB&T Arena 73-58

The Norse men’s basketball team defeated the UIC Flames at BB&T Arena on Sunday night 73-58.

Redshirt sophomore Jalen Tate led in scoring with 25 points and 6 assists. Senior Drew McDonald followed with 19 points and 20 rebounds, his second double-double of the weekend.

NKU led at the half 44-28, and the team shot 46 percent from field goal range.

After winning four straight games, the Norse are 12-3 overall.

Previously, the Flames narrowly beat NKU’s Horizon League rival Wright State on Friday night. The Norse are also 2 for 2 in conference play after dominating the IUPUI Jaguars at BB&T on Friday.

The Norse travel to the Oakland Grizzlies, currently the only other 2-0 team in the Horizon League, on Thursday, Jan. 3. Watch the game live on ESPN+ at 7 p.m.

This game coverage will be updated. Follow @northernersport for all your NKU sports news.

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Review: How ‘The Grinch’ Stole My Money

Walking into 2018’s “The Grinch,” I didn’t have very high expectations. It seemed passable, but nothing to get too excited over. Obviously, a college-aged student is not the intended audience for this film. But, when you have a four-year-old little brother, you tend to have to watch some things you don’t always care for.

“The Grinch” tells the same story as the 1966 television special and the 2000 live-action film. The Grinch hates Christmas with a passion. He feels left out by the Whos in Whoville. So, he decides that he is going to steal it from them so they can feel as miserable as he does. If you have seen either of it’s two predecessors, you know pretty much what happens in this film.

Most of the noticeable differences in this film come from the performances and the art style. The Grinch in this film is portrayed by “Doctor Strange” and BBC’s “Sherlockactor Benedict Cumberbatch. Based on the trailers alone, I didn’t think Cumberbatch was going to be a good choice for The Grinch. He didn’t sound Grinchy but more mildly annoyed. However, in the actual film, he did a great job. He could sound menacing whenever the scene required it and could be funny as well.

Aside from Cumberbatch, there were only a few other big-name actors. “Parks and Recreations” actress Rashida Jones played Donna Lou Who, the single mother of Cindy Lou Who, and “Saturday Night Live” cast member Kenan Thompson played the Grinch’s self-appointed best friend Mr. Bricklebaum. Both provided serviceable performances but nothing to write home about. The rest of the characters were portrayed by child actors. They were all minor roles except for the character of Cindy Lou Who. Cindy’s actress, Cameron Seely, was very good for a child actress and did a fine job of bringing the character to life.

The film also had a narrator in the form of musician Pharrell Williams. The inclusion of this narration almost felt pointless. He wasn’t disruptive, but he had no good reason to be there.

The film mostly relied on physical comedy to give the audience enjoyment. For the most part, it worked fine. The audience I was with laughed at the things they were supposed to laugh at. Most of it was amusing simply for the fact that it didn’t take much thought to understand it.

Another factor of the film was its art style. The Grinch, to put it simply, looks almost adorable. In stark contrast to other adaptations, he doesn’t look that menacing. You can tell he was designed to be a plush sold at Universal Studios. This isn’t a bad thing though. The film was nice to look at and was very simplistic in its nature.

All in all, “The Grinch” is a fine movie for the young ones in your family. It isn’t a film that is needed to be seen in theaters and is more suited to be watched on a DVD that you bought on a Black Friday sale. The average college student may not enjoy it, but it may provide a nice moment to gather the family around for an hour and a half of mindless entertainment.

Rating: 6 out of 10

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Six Jesuits Formerly Associated With GU Accused of Sexual Abuse, Reports Say

Six Jesuit priests who were at one point associated with Georgetown University have been credibly accused of sexually abusing minors, as determined by the Maryland, Midwest and West Provinces of the Society of Jesus in reports released this month. None of the allegations specify incidents of abuse at Georgetown, although estimated periods of abuse overlap with on-campus assignments, according to the reports. The Maryland Province’s Dec. 17 report lists priests who face credible accusations of sexual abuse — classified as allegations with “a preponderance of evidence that the allegation is more likely true than not” — as well as priests who were accused of committing abuse, but were not investigated. The Maryland Province did not investigate the credibility of an allegation in cases involving the death of an alleged abuser or incomplete historical information, according to the report. University President John J. DeGioia supported the disclosure by the Maryland Province and said Georgetown is dedicated to taking action against sexual abuse in a universitywide email Dec. 17. “Our University is deeply committed to preventing and responding to sexual assault and misconduct and to protecting the most vulnerable among us,” DeGioia wrote. “Let us all take part in this responsibility.” Fr. William J. Walsh, S.J., who was removed from public ministry in 1996, was implicated in multiple credible allegations of sexual abuse believed to have occurred from the 1950s to the 1980s, according to the Maryland Province report. Walsh worked at Georgetown from 1966 to 1967. In 1996, five sisters reported to the Maryland Province that Walsh, their uncle, had sexually abused each of them 40 years earlier while they were in his care, according to an April 1998 CNN interview with one of the sisters and the sisters’ attorney. Walsh was called back to the United States from his teaching position in China and removed from ministry later that year. He then worked at the Woodstock Theological Center, an independent Jesuit-run research institute housed at Georgetown that closed in 2013, from 1996 to 1998, according to the Maryland Province report. The sisters made the allegations public in 1998 to call for Walsh’s dismissal from the clergy, according to the CNN interview. Following the public allegations, Walsh did not live in the on-campus Jesuit residence and had been placed on administrative leave, according to a 1998 university news release reported in the Georgetown Voice. The news release also said Walsh did not engage with students in his duties at Woodstock. Fr. Michael Barber, S.J., who was removed from public ministry in 1994, pled guilty to harassment by inappropriate touching after the Maryland Province received an allegation against him, according to the report. The allegation was believed to have occurred in 1994. Barber served at the MedStar Georgetown University Hospital from 1976 to 1978. Walsh and Barber are both still living. Jesuit priests with credible accusations of abuse live in supervised environments unassociated with any Jesuit institution and undergo risk reduction programs monitored by the province review board, according to the Maryland Province. The Maryland Province reported it received one allegation of sexual abuse against Fr. Martin Casey, S.J., estimated to have occurred in 1959. Casey lived in the Georgetown Jesuit community from 1973 to 1997 and worked at the university from 1997 until his death in 2006. The Maryland Province did not investigate the allegation for credibility, but determined there was a “reasonable possibility” that the abuse occurred. The Midwest Province released its own report the same day as the Maryland Province, naming 65 Jesuits with an “established” accusation of sexual abuse, an allegation with a “reasonable certainty” of truth. Two names mentioned in the report held connections to Georgetown: Fr. Thomas Gannon, S.J., and Bernard Knoth, who was removed from public ministry in 2003 and permanently dismissed from the clergy in 2009. Both have faced more than one accusation of sexual abuse, according to the report. The Midwest Province detailed multiple allegations of sexual abuse against Gannon ranging from 1961 to 1998. These included a 1983 incident in Gary, Ind., just before Gannon moved to Woodstock, where he worked from 1983 to 1986. Gannon died in 2011. Allegations of sexual abuse against Knoth initially surfaced in 2003 and range from 1986 to 1988, during his time as principal of Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School in Indianapolis. He was assigned to Georgetown in 1990. At Georgetown, Knoth served as a lecturer, chaplain-in-residence and an Associate Dean of Georgetown College from 1990 to 1995. Knoth was also contacted in 2000 for the position of university president. The West Province named Fr. Augustine Ferretti, S.J., who was assigned to Georgetown from 1944 to 1947, on a list of credibly accused priests released Dec. 7. The West Province reported that, in 2009, it received allegations of abuse against Ferretti that ranged from 1952 to 1976. Ferretti died in 1982. The Maryland Province has affirmed its commitment to significant reforms for the protection of minors in light of the abuse crisis, according to Fr. Robert Hussey, S.J., Provincial Superior of the Maryland Province. “We are deeply sorry for the harm we have caused to victims and their families,” Hussey wrote in the Dec. 17 news release. “We view the disclosure today of our shameful history as part of our commitment now to preventing abuse.” Georgetown supports the transparency of the provinces in publishing the reports and encourages survivors of sexual abuse to access on-campus resources, according to a university spokesperson. “Releasing this list of names is one step in acknowledging and addressing the terrible history of abuse, and there is much more work to do,” the university spokesperson wrote in an email to The Hoya. “Georgetown is dedicated to preventing and responding to sexual assault and misconduct and encourages all members of our community to utilize available resources to report sexual misconduct or get support.” The lists’ release comes amid a movement to revoke the honorary Georgetown degrees of Former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, who has been the subject of multiple allegations of sexual abuse, and Cardinal Donald Wuerl, who was named in an August Pennsylvania grand jury report for covering up abuse. The university has assembled a working group to examine the honorary degrees given to McCarrick and Wuerl, but has not yet announced a decision.

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Review: Green Book

Ali, Mortensen deliver a heartwarming performance

The movie “Green Book” features stars Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali as they make their way through the Deep South during the Jim Crow Era. Ali graces the screen as the renowned African American pianist Don Shirley, who tours high-society venues throughout the South with the goal of changing racist perspectives with his performances.

“Green Book” begins by introducing the Italian-American Tony Vallelonga, played by Mortensen. When the nightclub where Vallelonga works as a bouncer closes for renovations, Vallelonga finds himself struggling to pay rent and support his family, going so far as to compete in a hotdog eating competition.

Shirley hires Vallelonga as his driver and bodyguard for his tour. While Shirley is refined, dignified and holds a doctorate in Psychology, Music and Liturgical Arts, Vallelonga is crude, vulgar and illiterate. Vallelonga is also racist. An early scene finds Vallelonga’s wife, Dolores, offering lemonade to African American repairmen, to which Vallelonga responds by tossing the used glasses in the trash. He reluctantly accepts the job as Shirley’s driver.

To be expected, Vallelonga clashes with Shirley, and the two begin the eight-week tour in mutual dislike. Vallelonga becomes increasingly impressed with Shirley’s classical performances and the high end venues. He writes his wife that he thinks Shirley is a genius.

Vallelonga also becomes more and more aware of the blatant prejudice Shirley endures. He is forced to refer to a pamphlet called the Green Book, a guide for African Americans on where they are welcome to shop, eat and sleep.

The duo manage their way through segregated hotels and bathrooms, sundown towns and violent exchanges. Throughout the trip, Vallelonga writes letters to his wife detailing his experiences and attempting to express his love for her. With help from Shirley, Vallelonga improves his romantic prose and a new understanding between the two men develops.

While the movie is ripe with comedic moments, a dialogue is opened about race in America. At one point, Vallelonga claims that with his low-income and living situation, he is more African American than Shirley. He cites the fact that Shirley was raised in a high-class society, lives in an ornately decorated apartment above Carnegie Hall and is not at all familiar with the stereotypical food and music of African American culture. Shirley shuts him down by distinguishing between race and class. Even though poor and uneducated, Vallelonga is still white and this ultimately grants him privilege and access.

“Green Book,” directed by Peter Farrelly, is based off a true story. Vallelonga’s son, Nick Vallelonga, wrote the screenplay based on his father’s letters to his mother and interviews with his father and Shirley, who reportedly remained good friends. There has been recent controversy, however. Shirley’s living relatives condemned the film for overstating the friendship between the men, in addition to falsely portraying Shirley as isolated and uncomfortable with his identity. “The Green Book” also depends on the problematic “Magical Negro” trope, where a black man and his story only exist to help a white man with his problems, which is seen is “The Green Mile,” “Ghost,” “Shawshank Redemption” and “The Legend of Bagger Vance.”

Despite this, “Green Book” is a feel-good optimistic film. While at first glance the film comes across as formulaic, subscribing to both the buddy movie and road trip plot cliches, the phenomenal acting by both Mortensen and Ali contribute to a fresh, nuanced performance.

So far well-received by audiences and critics, “Green Book” is already generating awards season buzz. The National Board of Review has named it the best film of 2018.

“Green Book” is playing at Regal Davis Stadium 5 as well as at multiple theaters in Sacramento.

Written By: Cheyenne Wiseman — arts@theaggie.org

The post Review: Green Book appeared first on The Aggie.

***

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Review: Green Book

Ali, Mortensen deliver a heartwarming performance

The movie “Green Book” features stars Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali as they make their way through the Deep South during the Jim Crow Era. Ali graces the screen as the renowned African American pianist Don Shirley, who tours high-society venues throughout the South with the goal of changing racist perspectives with his performances.

“Green Book” begins by introducing the Italian-American Tony Vallelonga, played by Mortensen. When the nightclub where Vallelonga works as a bouncer closes for renovations, Vallelonga finds himself struggling to pay rent and support his family, going so far as to compete in a hotdog eating competition.

Shirley hires Vallelonga as his driver and bodyguard for his tour. While Shirley is refined, dignified and holds a doctorate in Psychology, Music and Liturgical Arts, Vallelonga is crude, vulgar and illiterate. Vallelonga is also racist. An early scene finds Vallelonga’s wife, Dolores, offering lemonade to African American repairmen, to which Vallelonga responds by tossing the used glasses in the trash. He reluctantly accepts the job as Shirley’s driver.

To be expected, Vallelonga clashes with Shirley, and the two begin the eight-week tour in mutual dislike. Vallelonga becomes increasingly impressed with Shirley’s classical performances and the high end venues. He writes his wife that he thinks Shirley is a genius.

Vallelonga also becomes more and more aware of the blatant prejudice Shirley endures. He is forced to refer to a pamphlet called the Green Book, a guide for African Americans on where they are welcome to shop, eat and sleep.

The duo manage their way through segregated hotels and bathrooms, sundown towns and violent exchanges. Throughout the trip, Vallelonga writes letters to his wife detailing his experiences and attempting to express his love for her. With help from Shirley, Vallelonga improves his romantic prose and a new understanding between the two men develops.

While the movie is ripe with comedic moments, a dialogue is opened about race in America. At one point, Vallelonga claims that with his low-income and living situation, he is more African American than Shirley. He cites the fact that Shirley was raised in a high-class society, lives in an ornately decorated apartment above Carnegie Hall and is not at all familiar with the stereotypical food and music of African American culture. Shirley shuts him down by distinguishing between race and class. Even though poor and uneducated, Vallelonga is still white and this ultimately grants him privilege and access.

“Green Book,” directed by Peter Farrelly, is based off a true story. Vallelonga’s son, Nick Vallelonga, wrote the screenplay based on his father’s letters to his mother and interviews with his father and Shirley, who reportedly remained good friends. There has been recent controversy, however. Shirley’s living relatives condemned the film for overstating the friendship between the men, in addition to falsely portraying Shirley as isolated and uncomfortable with his identity. “The Green Book” also depends on the problematic “Magical Negro” trope, where a black man and his story only exist to help a white man with his problems, which is seen is “The Green Mile,” “Ghost,” “Shawshank Redemption” and “The Legend of Bagger Vance.”

Despite this, “Green Book” is a feel-good optimistic film. While at first glance the film comes across as formulaic, subscribing to both the buddy movie and road trip plot cliches, the phenomenal acting by both Mortensen and Ali contribute to a fresh, nuanced performance.

So far well-received by audiences and critics, “Green Book” is already generating awards season buzz. The National Board of Review has named it the best film of 2018.

“Green Book” is playing at Regal Davis Stadium 5 as well as at multiple theaters in Sacramento.

Written By: Cheyenne Wiseman — arts@theaggie.org

The post Review: Green Book appeared first on The Aggie.

***

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Review: Green Book

Ali, Mortensen deliver a heartwarming performance

The movie “Green Book” features stars Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali as they make their way through the Deep South during the Jim Crow Era. Ali graces the screen as the renowned African American pianist Don Shirley, who tours high-society venues throughout the South with the goal of changing racist perspectives with his performances.

“Green Book” begins by introducing the Italian-American Tony Vallelonga, played by Mortensen. When the nightclub where Vallelonga works as a bouncer closes for renovations, Vallelonga finds himself struggling to pay rent and support his family, going so far as to compete in a hotdog eating competition.

Shirley hires Vallelonga as his driver and bodyguard for his tour. While Shirley is refined, dignified and holds a doctorate in Psychology, Music and Liturgical Arts, Vallelonga is crude, vulgar and illiterate. Vallelonga is also racist. An early scene finds Vallelonga’s wife, Dolores, offering lemonade to African American repairmen, to which Vallelonga responds by tossing the used glasses in the trash. He reluctantly accepts the job as Shirley’s driver.

To be expected, Vallelonga clashes with Shirley, and the two begin the eight-week tour in mutual dislike. Vallelonga becomes increasingly impressed with Shirley’s classical performances and the high end venues. He writes his wife that he thinks Shirley is a genius.

Vallelonga also becomes more and more aware of the blatant prejudice Shirley endures. He is forced to refer to a pamphlet called the Green Book, a guide for African Americans on where they are welcome to shop, eat and sleep.

The duo manage their way through segregated hotels and bathrooms, sundown towns and violent exchanges. Throughout the trip, Vallelonga writes letters to his wife detailing his experiences and attempting to express his love for her. With help from Shirley, Vallelonga improves his romantic prose and a new understanding between the two men develops.

While the movie is ripe with comedic moments, a dialogue is opened about race in America. At one point, Vallelonga claims that with his low-income and living situation, he is more African American than Shirley. He cites the fact that Shirley was raised in a high-class society, lives in an ornately decorated apartment above Carnegie Hall and is not at all familiar with the stereotypical food and music of African American culture. Shirley shuts him down by distinguishing between race and class. Even though poor and uneducated, Vallelonga is still white and this ultimately grants him privilege and access.

“Green Book,” directed by Peter Farrelly, is based off a true story. Vallelonga’s son, Nick Vallelonga, wrote the screenplay based on his father’s letters to his mother and interviews with his father and Shirley, who reportedly remained good friends. There has been recent controversy, however. Shirley’s living relatives condemned the film for overstating the friendship between the men, in addition to falsely portraying Shirley as isolated and uncomfortable with his identity. “The Green Book” also depends on the problematic “Magical Negro” trope, where a black man and his story only exist to help a white man with his problems, which is seen is “The Green Mile,” “Ghost,” “Shawshank Redemption” and “The Legend of Bagger Vance.”

Despite this, “Green Book” is a feel-good optimistic film. While at first glance the film comes across as formulaic, subscribing to both the buddy movie and road trip plot cliches, the phenomenal acting by both Mortensen and Ali contribute to a fresh, nuanced performance.

So far well-received by audiences and critics, “Green Book” is already generating awards season buzz. The National Board of Review has named it the best film of 2018.

“Green Book” is playing at Regal Davis Stadium 5 as well as at multiple theaters in Sacramento.

Written By: Cheyenne Wiseman — arts@theaggie.org

The post Review: Green Book appeared first on The Aggie.

***

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Review: Green Book

Ali, Mortensen deliver a heartwarming performance

The movie “Green Book” features stars Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali as they make their way through the Deep South during the Jim Crow Era. Ali graces the screen as the renowned African American pianist Don Shirley, who tours high-society venues throughout the South with the goal of changing racist perspectives with his performances.

“Green Book” begins by introducing the Italian-American Tony Vallelonga, played by Mortensen. When the nightclub where Vallelonga works as a bouncer closes for renovations, Vallelonga finds himself struggling to pay rent and support his family, going so far as to compete in a hotdog eating competition.

Shirley hires Vallelonga as his driver and bodyguard for his tour. While Shirley is refined, dignified and holds a doctorate in Psychology, Music and Liturgical Arts, Vallelonga is crude, vulgar and illiterate. Vallelonga is also racist. An early scene finds Vallelonga’s wife, Dolores, offering lemonade to African American repairmen, to which Vallelonga responds by tossing the used glasses in the trash. He reluctantly accepts the job as Shirley’s driver.

To be expected, Vallelonga clashes with Shirley, and the two begin the eight-week tour in mutual dislike. Vallelonga becomes increasingly impressed with Shirley’s classical performances and the high end venues. He writes his wife that he thinks Shirley is a genius.

Vallelonga also becomes more and more aware of the blatant prejudice Shirley endures. He is forced to refer to a pamphlet called the Green Book, a guide for African Americans on where they are welcome to shop, eat and sleep.

The duo manage their way through segregated hotels and bathrooms, sundown towns and violent exchanges. Throughout the trip, Vallelonga writes letters to his wife detailing his experiences and attempting to express his love for her. With help from Shirley, Vallelonga improves his romantic prose and a new understanding between the two men develops.

While the movie is ripe with comedic moments, a dialogue is opened about race in America. At one point, Vallelonga claims that with his low-income and living situation, he is more African American than Shirley. He cites the fact that Shirley was raised in a high-class society, lives in an ornately decorated apartment above Carnegie Hall and is not at all familiar with the stereotypical food and music of African American culture. Shirley shuts him down by distinguishing between race and class. Even though poor and uneducated, Vallelonga is still white and this ultimately grants him privilege and access.

“Green Book,” directed by Peter Farrelly, is based off a true story. Vallelonga’s son, Nick Vallelonga, wrote the screenplay based on his father’s letters to his mother and interviews with his father and Shirley, who reportedly remained good friends. There has been recent controversy, however. Shirley’s living relatives condemned the film for overstating the friendship between the men, in addition to falsely portraying Shirley as isolated and uncomfortable with his identity. “The Green Book” also depends on the problematic “Magical Negro” trope, where a black man and his story only exist to help a white man with his problems, which is seen is “The Green Mile,” “Ghost,” “Shawshank Redemption” and “The Legend of Bagger Vance.”

Despite this, “Green Book” is a feel-good optimistic film. While at first glance the film comes across as formulaic, subscribing to both the buddy movie and road trip plot cliches, the phenomenal acting by both Mortensen and Ali contribute to a fresh, nuanced performance.

So far well-received by audiences and critics, “Green Book” is already generating awards season buzz. The National Board of Review has named it the best film of 2018.

“Green Book” is playing at Regal Davis Stadium 5 as well as at multiple theaters in Sacramento.

Written By: Cheyenne Wiseman — arts@theaggie.org

The post Review: Green Book appeared first on The Aggie.

***

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Residents, community leaders reflect on 125th anniversary of Evergreen Park

                                                                                                                              Photo by Joe Boyle

Anna Wassenaar, the reference librarian at the Evergreen Park Library, welcomes visitors to the 125th anniversary party for the village that was held last Thursday night. Wassenaar noted that the village was incorporated on the date of the gathering, Dec. 20, 1893.

By Joe Boyle

Residents came by to reminisce and catch up with present and former neighbors during a 125th anniversary celebration of Evergreen Park becoming a village that was held last Thursday night at the Evergreen Park Library.

The party was held to culminate special events and activities that were held during the past year to mark the anniversary of the village. However, the celebration held at the library was significant for one specific reason.

“This is the actual birthday of Evergreen Park being incorporated as a village,” pointed out Anna Wassenaar, the reference librarian at the Evergreen Park Library. “This is the culmination of a great year. This the last celebration of the 125th anniversary. It was also the same year of the Chicago World’s Fair. So, there was a lot going on that year.”

Evergreen Park was incorporated on Dec. 20, 1893 and has progressed from a series of truck farms into a municipality with a population of 20,000. The early founders of Evergreen Park chose the name because of the numerous pine trees that were found in what would later be called Klein Park, or Circle Park, at 97th Street and Homan Avenue.

Visitors were treated to cupcakes, hot cocoa and coffee on arriving at the library. Glenn Pniewski, who serves as the information representative for the village and is the executive director of the Evergreen Park Chamber of Commerce, also talked at the celebration that culminated a year of events honoring the 125 years the village was incorporated.

Pniewski, who is also active with the village’s theater department, introduced four performers who read passages from “Cherishing Our Past, Evergreen Park’s Centennial Celebration.” The performers read the recollections of past residents who recalled early life in the village that dated as far back as the early 20th century.

George Peso, chairman of the Evergreen Park Historical Commission, was also in attendance and was lauded by Pniewski for his efforts in showcasing Evergreen Park’s past during a well-received exhibit that was held in August at the Evergreen Park Senior Center.

Peso, who was wearing a Santa hat at last week’s party, plays St. Nick throughout the month of December and initially talked about greeting kids and passing out presents. But he added the commission members volunteered their time and put in the effort to make the exhibit special.

The exhibit included images of school classrooms from the 1930s, school uniforms and sport jerseys from Evergreen Park High School, and photos of the old Evergreen Plaza, Martinique and Bleeker’s Bowling alley.

“And you know this is not over,” Peso told the audience last week. “We are still collecting items from people that we can use. We welcome anyone who wants to bring us more items from the past. Anyone who would like to donate old cameras and other equipment will be most welcome.”

Peso, a retired contractor, said it took 18 months to compile information, collect photos, and display artifacts dating back 125 years of the village’s history.

“Everyone was surprised at what we have done,” said Peso, who has been a resident of Evergreen Park since 1955. “The mayor (Evergreen Park Mayor James Sexton) was completely in awe at what he saw. He was thrilled and nearly speechless.”

“I was in awe, to tell you the truth,” Sexton told The Reporter after witnessing the exhibit for the first time. “It’s just incredible what they have done. I have been here 43 years and my mouth just dropped at some of the things they were showing me. I thought I knew a lot and now I found out I don’t know that much. They have really worked hard on this. They are just great people.”

Boards were put on a table that provided a timeline of the village’s progression over the past 125 years. Wassenaar said a number of current and past items relating to Evergreen Park will be placed in a time capsule at the library to be opened up in 25 years in 2043.

“George and his people did a fantastic job with the museum this past summer.” Pniewski added.

The museum display boards during the exhibit also included photos from the old Evergreen Park Golf Course and information on the origins of Little Company of Mary Hospital. One of the passages that were read by a local actor mentioned Little Company was once swamp land.

A live podcast was also held at the library last Thursday with host Chris Nuti and co-host Hannah Kohut. They conducted interviews with Pniewski about the anniversary, and with Wassenaar about programs at the library.

More information about Evergreen Park’s history can be found at www.evergreenpark-ill.com. The Evergreen Park Library also maintains a history archive at www.evergreenparklibrary.org.

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Yale alumnus completes unprecedented crossing of Antarctica

Colin O’Brady ’06 completed the first ever “solo, unsupported, unaided” crossing of Antarctica on Wednesday, according to his website.

During the 54-day-long journey, which started on the Ronne Ice Shelf on the Atlantic and finished on the Leverett Glacier on the Pacific, O’Brady pulled a 300-pound sled 932 miles. In completing the crossing — which was unsupported by people and unaided by wind — O’Brady, 33, beat 49-year-old British army captain Louis Rudd, who had been competing against O’Brady to complete the unprecedented crossing. The two started at the same time on Nov. 3.

“I woke up this morning about 80 miles away from the finish line,” wrote O’Brady in an Instagram post published early Wednesday EST before finishing. “I wonder, would be possible to do one straight continuous push all the way to the end? By the time I was lacing up my boots the impossible plan had become a solidified goal. I’m going to go for it. I can feel it in my body that I am in the zone and want to harness that. It’s a rare and precious feeling to find the flow. I’m going to push on and try to finish all 80 miles to the end in one go.”

O’Brady completed the last 80 miles in a sleepless 32-hour push to the finish line.

Neither O’Brady nor anyone on his team was immediately available to comment.

Check back later for updates.

Skakel McCooey | skakel.mccooey@yale.edu

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U of L promotes John Michael Hayden to men’s soccer head coach

By Matt Bradshaw —

U of L has found a replacement for Ken Lolla two weeks out from the long-time leader’s resignation. Former assistant coach John Michael Hayden is officially taking over as the new head coach of Louisville men’s soccer.

The Personal Committee of the ULAA Board of Directors met to approve the promotion this morning, along with approving the promotion of Whitney Young to women’s golf head coach. Hayden has been signed to a four-year deal.

“Following a diligent search process, we are extremely pleased to name John Michael as our next head coach. There was an amazing amount of support for John Michael across all levels of the soccer world, including many connected with our program at Louisville,” athletics director Vince Tyra said. “He’s a talented coach and relentless recruiter who enjoys teaching an attacking style that will foster ongoing success.”

Hayden has experience as both a player and a coach, along with a history of winning championships.

He played collegiately for Indiana University, where he won back-to-back NCAA Championships in 2003 and 2004. Hayden was named to the NCAA College Cup All-Tournament Team during the 2004 title run.

The Louisville native, Trinity grad was selected in the 2007 MLS SuperDraft by the Houston Dynamo. His rookie season saw the Dynamo win the MLS Cup Championship.

“I am very excited to be the next head men’s soccer coach for the University of Louisville. I want to thank both Vince Tyra and Matt Banker for their belief in me. I firmly believe in Vince’s vision for this athletic program and know that I have the ability and passion to take the U of L soccer program to even greater heights,” Hayden said.

Hayden first coached on the U of L men’s soccer staff in 2012, when the Cardinals won the Big East and reached the Elite Eight. He next served as assistant coach at Lipscomb for two seasons, then assistant coach at Xavier in 2015.

The former pro returned to Louisville in 2016, when the Cards again reached the Elite Eight of the NCAA Championship. This past season, the men’s soccer team reached new heights with the program’s first ever ACC Championship title.

“Through my soccer career, I have spent time in a number of championship environments as both a player and coach, which gives me a blueprint for what it takes to win,” Hayden said. “My hope is to build on the success Ken Lolla achieved here at Louisville to raise the program to an even higher standard of excellence. Ken laid a great foundation and I’d be remiss to not thank him for all he has done for me. He is an unbelievable coach, mentor, and most importantly, a good friend. I wish Ken all the best in his future endeavors.”

Across his tenure as assistant coach, U of L holds a 52-19-11 overall record with four NCAA Championship berths and three Elite Eight appearances. Hayden becomes the fifth men’s soccer head coach in the history of the program.

Hayden has received vocal support for his new position from many across the sport, including Indiana head coach Todd Yeagley and Louisville FC head coach John Hackworth.

“John Michael has been instrumental in the success of the program over the past three seasons. He is prepared to lead the U of L men’s soccer program to greater success,” Lolla said. “Most importantly, he is a person of high integrity and strong character. This will be the basis for future growth of the program. His ties to the community will further connect U of L fans with the program. It will be exciting to watch the development under John Michael.”

Men’s soccer loses four seniors to graduation this coming year, including scoring leader Tate Schmitt. Hayden says he is ready to work with new players and get things going.

“We have a tremendous group of returning players and incoming recruits, so I’m ready to hit the ground running,” Hayden said. “Louisville is home for me and my family and there is no other place in the country I’d rather be than the University of Louisville.”

Hayden married Hollie Minogue in 2007, who played for U of L women’s soccer, and the pair have two sons: Liam and Jacob.

You can follow the Louisville Cardinal on Twitter @thecardsports.

Photo courtesy / Louisville Athletics

The post U of L promotes John Michael Hayden to men’s soccer head coach appeared first on The Louisville Cardinal.

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“A Brief Inquiry into Online Relationships”- Album Review

In the fall of 2016, I got to see The 1975 in concert at the Fox theater during their tour for their second album. It was a solid show with lead singer Matty Healy and company intertwining their old hits and new anthems into a performance that ultimately showcased their versatility as a rock band, pop group and occasionally a jazz quartet.

Healy was relaxed and confident, often addressing the audience directly, or embarking on pseudo-philosophical critiques of our tumultuous political climate or other topics I couldn’t quite distinguish being so far from the stage.

IN CONCERT AND INEBRIATED

Somewhere in between his monologuing and erratic dancing, Healy had procured a bottle of wine and was taking large swigs from it in between songs. I thought it was odd but not uncharacteristic of the ecentric rock personality to enjoy a drink or two during his own concert. After the show, I learned that the bottle of wine during the later half of their concert was as much a part of Healy’s performance as his wild dancing style.

In an interview to the Guardian, Healy said, “I never used to really drink, but the bottle of wine on stage quickly became something to calm the nerves, and then part of the show.” If Healy needed a bottle of wine to get through a show every night, I wondered if he was doing as well as he’d like fans to believe.

Shortly before the release of their first single earlier this year, my question about Healy’s wellbeing was answered. After he admitted to a heroin addiction and subsequent relapse, it became clear that The 1975 frontman was definitely not well.

But after seven weeks in rehab, and a string of fresh singles teasing a new LP, The 1975 are back with an album that’s equally as inspired by Healy’s own demons as it is with the rest of the world’s problems.

Many of the themes and sounds on this record are the direct descendants of the genre bending music of their last album, but more developed and consequently more touching because of it.

HARD ROCK, AND EVEN HARDER SOCIAL COMMENTARY

On Love Me, the lead single to the band’s previous album, Healy asks “Hey, would you like to look outside sometimes? I’m just with my friends online and there’s things we’d like to change.” This lyric seemed vague at the time, but Healy uses A Brief Inquiry into Online Relationships to make all the things he’d “like to change perfectly clear,” augmenting the salient social commentary with personal self-reflection that’s just as eye-catching as it is eye roll worthy at times.

On the album’s lead single, “Love It If We Made It,” Healy fires off a list of pop cultural references, political happenings, and personal experiences, all erratically existing alongside one another, mimicking the way newsfeeds and social media haphazardly allows these events and experiences to coexist in one place.

The result is jarring and catchy as Healy’s bitingly Staccato delivery hits with the force of a thousand snare drums. Healy nimbly moves from topic to topic, addressing Kanye West, Donald Trump, the prison industrial system, the opioid epidemic, and even bored teens online.

THE SOFTER SIDE OF ROCK

On “Give Yourself A Try,” Healy offers his sage advice to twenty somethings with vinyl collections and coffee addictions over a manic techno instrumentation that sounds like an alarm going off to alert you that you’re probably wasting your twenties, and that’s okay. It’s a track that’s both sincere and comical, and addresses the potentially frightening prospect of growing older with a sense of humor and sympathy that many will find endearing but not cheesy.

One of my favorite tracks on the album, “Sincerity Is Scary is a jazzy,” is alaid back song that finds Healy lamenting the death of sincerity in our increasingly ironic culture. This track has some of the best and worst lyrics on the album with Healy spouting “Instead of calling me out, you should be pulling me in,” as a surface deep critique of internet culture.

But in the next line he asks “why would you believe you could control how your perceived when at your best you’re intermediately versed in your own feelings?”

It’s a sharply written lyric that highlights how Healy can occasionally deliver lyricism that’s insightful and impacting, like a swift punch in the gut.

HEALY’S DEMONS AND OUR DEMONS

In other areas of the record, the 1975 broach more personal subjects. The bright piano driven track, “It’s Not Living If (It’s Not With You)” gives Healy the chance to sonically address his anthropomorphized heroin addiction. The playful pop instrumentation contrasts the serious subject matter.“Collapse my veins wearing beautiful shoes, It’s not living if its not with you”, Healy sings, describing the obsessive allure of a dangerous drug habit.

The album clocks in at 15 tracks which is shorter than their 2016 album but still feels like it could have been shorter. A few tracks towards the middle of the album slow down its momentum, often forcing a press of the skip button.

“I Like America and America Likes Me” is the band’s take on trap music with an oddly existential lyricism. Healy’s autotuned voice screeching about his fear of death is an odd juxtaposition that I’m not sure works completely. Likewise, the tracks Inside My Mind and Be My Mistake are largely forgettable songs that sound like less compelling versions of songs from their last two albums.

THE BEGINNING IN THE END

However, The 1975 end the album on an emotionally resonant note with the tracks “I Couldn’t Be More In Love” and “I Always Wanna Die (Sometimes).” The former sees Healy reflecting on a failed relationship in which he still felt love for the other person even after its conclusion. Healy shouts into some romantic void “What about these feelings I’ve got?”

The catchy and inexplicably uplifting I Always wanna Die (Sometimes) tackles the insurmountable sadness that comes from simply living and experiencing life, and always wanting to die (sometimes) because of it. It’s a relatable song that sees the band revive its older indie british rock sound and lends the album a sense of circularity and closure. The 1975 would “Love It If We Made It” but also acknowledges that “making it,” or surviving in the world also might mean wanting to die (sometimes).

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Retrievers impress against Hood

The Retrievers men’s basketball team lost two consecutive games in which they were heavily favored against Towson and FGCU. On Friday the Retrievers were heavily favored once again, with ESPN’s matchup predictor giving the Retrievers a 99.6 percent chance to beat the Division III Hood College Blazers.

But the Blazers impressed the Retrievers early on as they held an early 14-9 lead. Their three-point shooting was impressive through the first few minutes as they were shooting over 50 percent from behind the arch. They were able to keep the game close through much of the first half until UMBC went on a 10-0 run with 5:48 left in the half. The two teams would go into halftime with a 45-32 Retriever lead.

In the second half, the Blazers came out with an impressive performance. They would use a 15-5 run to cut the Retrievers lead to just 3 points. However, Hood would be unable to tie the Retrievers for the rest of the game. Over the last 13 minutes of the game, UMBC would dominate, giving them an easy 86-65 victory.

Graduate-forward Joe Sherburne impressed on the evening, as he started the game scoring 7 of the teams first 9 points. Overall Sherburne went 6-10 from the field scoring 15 points and narrowly missing a double-double with 9 rebounds. Sherburne also registered 6 assists.

Sophomore-forward Brandon Horvath led the team in scoring with 19 points off the bench. He also registered 5 rebounds and had 3 of the Retrievers 8 rebounds on the evening.

Senior-guard Isiah Rodgers has perhaps the most exciting performance on the evening. Rodgers does not get much playing time, but in the closing minutes, he dazzled the crowd. In the closing minute, Rodgers notched his first career three-point basket, taking an open three from the right side of the arch as teammates celebrated. He also made a layup directly under the basket for UMBC’s last points of the game. There was an opportunity for another three-pointer with an open shot from the left corner, but the ball went in and out causing groans from teammates. On the evening Rodgers registered a career-high 5 points.

The Retrievers improve their record to 7-6 on the year. After a hiatus for the holiday, the team will play again on Dec. 29 at NIT champion Penn State.

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Jaden Smith expands his horizons with ‘The Sunset Tapes’

Jaden Smith, like the rest of his family, has been displaying his talent across multiple platforms since a young age. He has acted in a number of movies and shows. He founded JUST Water, an eco-friendly water company. He also founded MSFTSRep, short for MSFTS Republic, an art collective that includes Smith and other artists such as his sister Willow, ¿Téo? and Harry Hudson. In terms of his music career, Smith released his first studio album “SYRE” in 2017. On Nov. 17, 2018, the one year anniversary of the “SYRE” drop, Smith released “The Sunset Tapes: A Cool Tape Story,” an 11-track mixtape that speaks to Smith’s range as an artist. He also released his clothing line, The (((VISION))) Collection, on the same day.

Smith worked to hype up the album release by tweeting pictures of various girls with the caption “November 17th.” On Nov. 23, Smith tweeted an explanation of his artistic intentions with the creation of “The Sunset Tapes.”

“I Evolved My Sound To Involve A Wider Group Of People To Our Conversation,” he wrote. “I Had To Bridge The Gap Between SYRE & ERYS Because The Chasm Is Too Vast.” Smith references the personas he has created for his albums, Syre being one of his middle names and Erys being Syre reversed. Smith also wrote that he was inspired by all of the women in his life, which can explain the album’s softer, more emotionally vulnerable side. Overall, Smith has a hip-hop sound that gets his listeners hype, but he displays his versatility by also including more mellow, chill R&B songs that can put you in your feelings.

The album opens with “SOHO,” a song that seems to start out slow with the tinkling of a few piano notes, but with the looming feeling that a beat is going to drop. It does, and Smith smoothly raps about a girl who broke up with him: “Said that I’d give you the world and you turned it to a snow globe.” He drops references to Asian culture, like the writings of Osho, the Indian spiritual guru, and kimonos. Smith also specifically references Japanese culture in his single “GOKU,” for which the music video was shot on a city street in Japan and features Smith going ‘Super Saiyan’ just like the “Dragon Ball Z” character.

The next song on the album is “A Calabasas Freestyle,” which has an immediate beat drop. He raps about his current lifestyle and those who can’t see his vision: “They can’t understand my intentions / Man, they can’t understand my inventions.” He also includes a line that further explains his aim for the album: “This is drastically different / That’s why I had to drop the tape just to gradually shift it.” The tape is an effort on Smith’s part to bridge the gaps between his works.

“Plastic” is also immediately hype, with Smith rapping through auto-tune and a distortion filter. The music video features his usual aesthetic choices, the sunset providing a picturesque backdrop while Smith dances around a Tesla. He wears clothes from his own line and drinks JUST Water, which ties back to the title of the song and Smith’s efforts to be more environmentally conscious. The video also has a moment when “This Is Not A Part Of The SYRE Timeline” flashes in yellow print, further showing how Smith wants to create a distinction between his works. However, with the similarities in music video and song styles, it’s hard to see much difference between this timeline and that of Smith’s previous album.

There’s even a song on “The Sunset Tapes” that references Smith’s past persona, called “SYRE In Abbey Road.” Another one of Smith’s softer ballads about a girl he’s in love with, the song also features a distortion filter that provokes a transcendent state for the listener. The penultimate song of the album, “FALLEN Part 2,” provides another reference to Smith’s previous work, as “SYRE” features a song called “Fallen.” Smith reminisces about a past love, as opposed to the original “Fallen,” where he initially professes his feelings. Both songs are sure to plunge the listener into their feelings, whether over an ex or a current crush.

I really enjoy listening to this album and appreciate Smith’s versatility as an artist in terms of the different vibes he creates through his sound. I can see the tape as a bridge between what Smith has been creating and what he will create in the future, but I would’ve liked to feel more growth from his previous album. Therefore, I’d give “The Sunset Tapes” an 8/10.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Jaden Smith expands his horizons with ‘The Sunset Tapes’

Jaden Smith, like the rest of his family, has been displaying his talent across multiple platforms since a young age. He has acted in a number of movies and shows. He founded JUST Water, an eco-friendly water company. He also founded MSFTSRep, short for MSFTS Republic, an art collective that includes Smith and other artists such as his sister Willow, ¿Téo? and Harry Hudson. In terms of his music career, Smith released his first studio album “SYRE” in 2017. On Nov. 17, 2018, the one year anniversary of the “SYRE” drop, Smith released “The Sunset Tapes: A Cool Tape Story,” an 11-track mixtape that speaks to Smith’s range as an artist. He also released his clothing line, The (((VISION))) Collection, on the same day.

Smith worked to hype up the album release by tweeting pictures of various girls with the caption “November 17th.” On Nov. 23, Smith tweeted an explanation of his artistic intentions with the creation of “The Sunset Tapes.”

“I Evolved My Sound To Involve A Wider Group Of People To Our Conversation,” he wrote. “I Had To Bridge The Gap Between SYRE & ERYS Because The Chasm Is Too Vast.” Smith references the personas he has created for his albums, Syre being one of his middle names and Erys being Syre reversed. Smith also wrote that he was inspired by all of the women in his life, which can explain the album’s softer, more emotionally vulnerable side. Overall, Smith has a hip-hop sound that gets his listeners hype, but he displays his versatility by also including more mellow, chill R&B songs that can put you in your feelings.

The album opens with “SOHO,” a song that seems to start out slow with the tinkling of a few piano notes, but with the looming feeling that a beat is going to drop. It does, and Smith smoothly raps about a girl who broke up with him: “Said that I’d give you the world and you turned it to a snow globe.” He drops references to Asian culture, like the writings of Osho, the Indian spiritual guru, and kimonos. Smith also specifically references Japanese culture in his single “GOKU,” for which the music video was shot on a city street in Japan and features Smith going ‘Super Saiyan’ just like the “Dragon Ball Z” character.

The next song on the album is “A Calabasas Freestyle,” which has an immediate beat drop. He raps about his current lifestyle and those who can’t see his vision: “They can’t understand my intentions / Man, they can’t understand my inventions.” He also includes a line that further explains his aim for the album: “This is drastically different / That’s why I had to drop the tape just to gradually shift it.” The tape is an effort on Smith’s part to bridge the gaps between his works.

“Plastic” is also immediately hype, with Smith rapping through auto-tune and a distortion filter. The music video features his usual aesthetic choices, the sunset providing a picturesque backdrop while Smith dances around a Tesla. He wears clothes from his own line and drinks JUST Water, which ties back to the title of the song and Smith’s efforts to be more environmentally conscious. The video also has a moment when “This Is Not A Part Of The SYRE Timeline” flashes in yellow print, further showing how Smith wants to create a distinction between his works. However, with the similarities in music video and song styles, it’s hard to see much difference between this timeline and that of Smith’s previous album.

There’s even a song on “The Sunset Tapes” that references Smith’s past persona, called “SYRE In Abbey Road.” Another one of Smith’s softer ballads about a girl he’s in love with, the song also features a distortion filter that provokes a transcendent state for the listener. The penultimate song of the album, “FALLEN Part 2,” provides another reference to Smith’s previous work, as “SYRE” features a song called “Fallen.” Smith reminisces about a past love, as opposed to the original “Fallen,” where he initially professes his feelings. Both songs are sure to plunge the listener into their feelings, whether over an ex or a current crush.

I really enjoy listening to this album and appreciate Smith’s versatility as an artist in terms of the different vibes he creates through his sound. I can see the tape as a bridge between what Smith has been creating and what he will create in the future, but I would’ve liked to feel more growth from his previous album. Therefore, I’d give “The Sunset Tapes” an 8/10.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Jaden Smith expands his horizons with ‘The Sunset Tapes’

Jaden Smith, like the rest of his family, has been displaying his talent across multiple platforms since a young age. He has acted in a number of movies and shows. He founded JUST Water, an eco-friendly water company. He also founded MSFTSRep, short for MSFTS Republic, an art collective that includes Smith and other artists such as his sister Willow, ¿Téo? and Harry Hudson. In terms of his music career, Smith released his first studio album “SYRE” in 2017. On Nov. 17, 2018, the one year anniversary of the “SYRE” drop, Smith released “The Sunset Tapes: A Cool Tape Story,” an 11-track mixtape that speaks to Smith’s range as an artist. He also released his clothing line, The (((VISION))) Collection, on the same day.

Smith worked to hype up the album release by tweeting pictures of various girls with the caption “November 17th.” On Nov. 23, Smith tweeted an explanation of his artistic intentions with the creation of “The Sunset Tapes.”

“I Evolved My Sound To Involve A Wider Group Of People To Our Conversation,” he wrote. “I Had To Bridge The Gap Between SYRE & ERYS Because The Chasm Is Too Vast.” Smith references the personas he has created for his albums, Syre being one of his middle names and Erys being Syre reversed. Smith also wrote that he was inspired by all of the women in his life, which can explain the album’s softer, more emotionally vulnerable side. Overall, Smith has a hip-hop sound that gets his listeners hype, but he displays his versatility by also including more mellow, chill R&B songs that can put you in your feelings.

The album opens with “SOHO,” a song that seems to start out slow with the tinkling of a few piano notes, but with the looming feeling that a beat is going to drop. It does, and Smith smoothly raps about a girl who broke up with him: “Said that I’d give you the world and you turned it to a snow globe.” He drops references to Asian culture, like the writings of Osho, the Indian spiritual guru, and kimonos. Smith also specifically references Japanese culture in his single “GOKU,” for which the music video was shot on a city street in Japan and features Smith going ‘Super Saiyan’ just like the “Dragon Ball Z” character.

The next song on the album is “A Calabasas Freestyle,” which has an immediate beat drop. He raps about his current lifestyle and those who can’t see his vision: “They can’t understand my intentions / Man, they can’t understand my inventions.” He also includes a line that further explains his aim for the album: “This is drastically different / That’s why I had to drop the tape just to gradually shift it.” The tape is an effort on Smith’s part to bridge the gaps between his works.

“Plastic” is also immediately hype, with Smith rapping through auto-tune and a distortion filter. The music video features his usual aesthetic choices, the sunset providing a picturesque backdrop while Smith dances around a Tesla. He wears clothes from his own line and drinks JUST Water, which ties back to the title of the song and Smith’s efforts to be more environmentally conscious. The video also has a moment when “This Is Not A Part Of The SYRE Timeline” flashes in yellow print, further showing how Smith wants to create a distinction between his works. However, with the similarities in music video and song styles, it’s hard to see much difference between this timeline and that of Smith’s previous album.

There’s even a song on “The Sunset Tapes” that references Smith’s past persona, called “SYRE In Abbey Road.” Another one of Smith’s softer ballads about a girl he’s in love with, the song also features a distortion filter that provokes a transcendent state for the listener. The penultimate song of the album, “FALLEN Part 2,” provides another reference to Smith’s previous work, as “SYRE” features a song called “Fallen.” Smith reminisces about a past love, as opposed to the original “Fallen,” where he initially professes his feelings. Both songs are sure to plunge the listener into their feelings, whether over an ex or a current crush.

I really enjoy listening to this album and appreciate Smith’s versatility as an artist in terms of the different vibes he creates through his sound. I can see the tape as a bridge between what Smith has been creating and what he will create in the future, but I would’ve liked to feel more growth from his previous album. Therefore, I’d give “The Sunset Tapes” an 8/10.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Jaden Smith expands his horizons with ‘The Sunset Tapes’

Jaden Smith, like the rest of his family, has been displaying his talent across multiple platforms since a young age. He has acted in a number of movies and shows. He founded JUST Water, an eco-friendly water company. He also founded MSFTSRep, short for MSFTS Republic, an art collective that includes Smith and other artists such as his sister Willow, ¿Téo? and Harry Hudson. In terms of his music career, Smith released his first studio album “SYRE” in 2017. On Nov. 17, 2018, the one year anniversary of the “SYRE” drop, Smith released “The Sunset Tapes: A Cool Tape Story,” an 11-track mixtape that speaks to Smith’s range as an artist. He also released his clothing line, The (((VISION))) Collection, on the same day.

Smith worked to hype up the album release by tweeting pictures of various girls with the caption “November 17th.” On Nov. 23, Smith tweeted an explanation of his artistic intentions with the creation of “The Sunset Tapes.”

“I Evolved My Sound To Involve A Wider Group Of People To Our Conversation,” he wrote. “I Had To Bridge The Gap Between SYRE & ERYS Because The Chasm Is Too Vast.” Smith references the personas he has created for his albums, Syre being one of his middle names and Erys being Syre reversed. Smith also wrote that he was inspired by all of the women in his life, which can explain the album’s softer, more emotionally vulnerable side. Overall, Smith has a hip-hop sound that gets his listeners hype, but he displays his versatility by also including more mellow, chill R&B songs that can put you in your feelings.

The album opens with “SOHO,” a song that seems to start out slow with the tinkling of a few piano notes, but with the looming feeling that a beat is going to drop. It does, and Smith smoothly raps about a girl who broke up with him: “Said that I’d give you the world and you turned it to a snow globe.” He drops references to Asian culture, like the writings of Osho, the Indian spiritual guru, and kimonos. Smith also specifically references Japanese culture in his single “GOKU,” for which the music video was shot on a city street in Japan and features Smith going ‘Super Saiyan’ just like the “Dragon Ball Z” character.

The next song on the album is “A Calabasas Freestyle,” which has an immediate beat drop. He raps about his current lifestyle and those who can’t see his vision: “They can’t understand my intentions / Man, they can’t understand my inventions.” He also includes a line that further explains his aim for the album: “This is drastically different / That’s why I had to drop the tape just to gradually shift it.” The tape is an effort on Smith’s part to bridge the gaps between his works.

“Plastic” is also immediately hype, with Smith rapping through auto-tune and a distortion filter. The music video features his usual aesthetic choices, the sunset providing a picturesque backdrop while Smith dances around a Tesla. He wears clothes from his own line and drinks JUST Water, which ties back to the title of the song and Smith’s efforts to be more environmentally conscious. The video also has a moment when “This Is Not A Part Of The SYRE Timeline” flashes in yellow print, further showing how Smith wants to create a distinction between his works. However, with the similarities in music video and song styles, it’s hard to see much difference between this timeline and that of Smith’s previous album.

There’s even a song on “The Sunset Tapes” that references Smith’s past persona, called “SYRE In Abbey Road.” Another one of Smith’s softer ballads about a girl he’s in love with, the song also features a distortion filter that provokes a transcendent state for the listener. The penultimate song of the album, “FALLEN Part 2,” provides another reference to Smith’s previous work, as “SYRE” features a song called “Fallen.” Smith reminisces about a past love, as opposed to the original “Fallen,” where he initially professes his feelings. Both songs are sure to plunge the listener into their feelings, whether over an ex or a current crush.

I really enjoy listening to this album and appreciate Smith’s versatility as an artist in terms of the different vibes he creates through his sound. I can see the tape as a bridge between what Smith has been creating and what he will create in the future, but I would’ve liked to feel more growth from his previous album. Therefore, I’d give “The Sunset Tapes” an 8/10.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Strong first quarter not enough against No. 18 Wildcats

Story by Gage Johnson

Senior writer

gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

In spite of a spectacular performance from junior forward Evelyn Adebayo, Murray State’s women’s basketball team couldn’t quite slay the No. 17 University of Kentucky Wildcats.

The Racers came charging out of the gates, looking to go toe-to-toe with the Wildcats. After one quarter of play Murray State had done just that, with the score knotted up at 20 thanks to a 5-for-6 shooting performance from junior forward Evelyn Adebayo. Adebayo would end the game a rebound shy of a double-double with 20 points and nine rebounds.

For the second game in a row, a rough second quarter stint would come back to haunt the Racers. UK would go on an 18-3 run to outscore Murray State 22-8 in the second quarter, thus taking a 42-28 lead into the locker room.

Head Coach Rechelle Turner attributed turnovers to being a big part of their offensive struggles, as the Racers had 18 going into the second half.

“In the first half we had 18 turnovers and they got 18 points off of it,” Turner said in her post-game radio comments. “Some of it is because of their pressure and length, but some of it’s unforced, and that’s just not mentally being tagged in on what we’re trying to do. We’ve got to find a way to get more possessions.”

From there on it would be all Wildcats. UK controlled the game on both ends of the floor outscoring the Racers 46-21 in the second half to claim an 88-49 victory.

The Wildcats showed just why they are one of the top 25 teams in the country, shooting just over 50 percent from the field with 10-for-21 shooting from beyond the arch. UK would also turn 27 turnovers into 25 points throughout the game.

Turner believes Murray State has yet to hit its peak and is excited for the challenge of taking on the University of Tennessee. Despite the inevitable outcomes, she hopes that these two tough contests will be confidence boosters and help her team grow going into its opening conference game on Jan. 3.

“We’re in a process right now,” Turner said. “In the long run it’s going to make us a better program. Getting a new locker room and helping our facilities for our locker room and helping our players feel ownership in our program is part of the process. So if we have to take some losses along the way then so be it.”

The Racers will now have a week to rest before heading to Knoxville, Tennessee, to take on the No. 9 Volunteers at 6 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 28, at the Thompson-Boling Arena.

***

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Opinion: The failed impeachment against Gov. Luke Turner proves that Student Government is not for the students

Editor’s note: Sayd Hussain is a former Student Court associate justice. He authored the Articles of Impeachment in an attempt to remove Boca campus Gov. Luke Turner from office.

Student Government was created to help students learn and serve the university’s community, but nothing could be further from the truth right now.

In November, a firm majority of 23 house members voted to impeach Luke Turner, our Boca Raton campus governor. They believed he was incompetent, neglected his duties, and obstructed justice. But according to the SG constitution, a two-thirds majority is required for an impeachment to proceed in SG, meaning 29 votes were needed to impeach Turner.

Despite my belief that Turner wasted students’ money and committed other offenses, 17 House members voted to keep him in office. Regardless of how much damage one man can do, and of how much power one man can have, they actively voted against the better interest of the 500 students they each represent.

SG is no longer for the students but instead for those who abuse the little power they hold.

The University Press reached out to Turner for comment but did not receive a response as of publication time.

Turner only looked after his own interests

During the impeachment, Rep. Matthew McClure asked the campus governor about the firing of Elijah Colas, the multicultural program director, and Gabby Webb, the Boca campus treasurer.

“Did you read the UPress articles?” Turner responded.

I believe he was referring to the fact that Colas and Webb both commented in a previous University Press article about the impeachment. Webb cited her concerns regarding finance, while Colas commented on Turner’s “incompetence.”

I do not think Turner was happy that they spoke to the press. Shortly after their comments were posted by the UP, he filed an executive order to remove them from their respective positions.

I maintain he may have done this as an act of retaliation for the statements that they gave.

“I got temporarily fired for speaking out against Gov. Turner, which risked not only my job but Elijah’s [Colas] too,” Webb commented after the impeachment.

Webb and Colas were removed from their positions until Turner withdrew his executive order the same day he issued it.

“This risked losing valuable pay, my internship credit, and my reputation as campus treasurer. Furthermore, I have not been spoken to by the governor because it seems that things will never change,” Webb added.

But despite removing the campus treasurer and multicultural programming director for allegedly speaking out against him in a blatant abuse of power, 17 house members still voted against the impeachment.

And this is not the only thing I think he should’ve been impeached for.

Turner’s actions shouldn’t just be upsetting me

The governor’s budget is taken from Activity and Service (A&S) fees, which are collected as part of our tuition and are supposed to be spent to benefit the students.

Despite this, I believe Turner wasted your hard-earned money.

According to a public records request of the Boca Raton governor’s budget, Turner spent $3,488 in student fees to go to Washington, D.C. for the American Student Government Association conference (ASGA) in October.

The trip itself was booked less than one month prior, even though the reservation deadline was in July, meaning the resulting late registration fees were paid by A&S fees.

But this wasn’t his only instance of wild spending. The records request also revealed that Turner:

  • Spent $4,189 on a campus address, which is an annual speech each campus governor is required to give
  • Spent $5,000 on ponchos that were meant for the football season but arrived after it was over

The amount of money put into his campus address was especially concerning, as former Boca campus Gov. Der’Resha Bastien spent $184 on her campus address.

That means that Turner spent almost 23 times more money on his speech than Bastien.

The quality of SG programs will have to be sacrificed because of Turner’s handling of A&S fees.

And I do not think Turner has hosted a single successful event that was dedicated to the betterment of the student body.

His $36,000 budget is not his money. It’s the students’ money, and we entrusted him with our wallets only to be taken advantage of.

Turner and the rest of SG let the student body down

Along with many other students, I supported Turner when he first ran for office

From initiatives to include on-campus Chick-fil-A breakfast options to his claim that he was the best candidate to provide for the students, Turner had a great campaign message and even greater promises.

But these were promises he failed to live up to.

Watching Turner fail to provide for students with their A&S fees is a slap in the face to those who voted to put him in power.

I tried to impeach him, but SG did not believe in me as a student, nor will it believe in you.

It will only believe in the man with power.

Sayd Hussain is a contributing writer with the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email shussain2016@fau.edu.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Opinion: The failed impeachment against Gov. Luke Turner proves that Student Government is not for the students

Editor’s note: Sayd Hussain is a former Student Court associate justice. He authored the Articles of Impeachment in an attempt to remove Boca campus Gov. Luke Turner from office.

Student Government was created to help students learn and serve the university’s community, but nothing could be further from the truth right now.

In November, a firm majority of 23 house members voted to impeach Luke Turner, our Boca Raton campus governor. They believed he was incompetent, neglected his duties, and obstructed justice. But according to the SG constitution, a two-thirds majority is required for an impeachment to proceed in SG, meaning 29 votes were needed to impeach Turner.

Despite my belief that Turner wasted students’ money and committed other offenses, 17 House members voted to keep him in office. Regardless of how much damage one man can do, and of how much power one man can have, they actively voted against the better interest of the 500 students they each represent.

SG is no longer for the students but instead for those who abuse the little power they hold.

The University Press reached out to Turner for comment but did not receive a response as of publication time.

Turner only looked after his own interests

During the impeachment, Rep. Matthew McClure asked the campus governor about the firing of Elijah Colas, the multicultural program director, and Gabby Webb, the Boca campus treasurer.

“Did you read the UPress articles?” Turner responded.

I believe he was referring to the fact that Colas and Webb both commented in a previous University Press article about the impeachment. Webb cited her concerns regarding finance, while Colas commented on Turner’s “incompetence.”

I do not think Turner was happy that they spoke to the press. Shortly after their comments were posted by the UP, he filed an executive order to remove them from their respective positions.

I maintain he may have done this as an act of retaliation for the statements that they gave.

“I got temporarily fired for speaking out against Gov. Turner, which risked not only my job but Elijah’s [Colas] too,” Webb commented after the impeachment.

Webb and Colas were removed from their positions until Turner withdrew his executive order the same day he issued it.

“This risked losing valuable pay, my internship credit, and my reputation as campus treasurer. Furthermore, I have not been spoken to by the governor because it seems that things will never change,” Webb added.

But despite removing the campus treasurer and multicultural programming director for allegedly speaking out against him in a blatant abuse of power, 17 house members still voted against the impeachment.

And this is not the only thing I think he should’ve been impeached for.

Turner’s actions shouldn’t just be upsetting me

The governor’s budget is taken from Activity and Service (A&S) fees, which are collected as part of our tuition and are supposed to be spent to benefit the students.

Despite this, I believe Turner wasted your hard-earned money.

According to a public records request of the Boca Raton governor’s budget, Turner spent $3,488 in student fees to go to Washington, D.C. for the American Student Government Association conference (ASGA) in October.

The trip itself was booked less than one month prior, even though the reservation deadline was in July, meaning the resulting late registration fees were paid by A&S fees.

But this wasn’t his only instance of wild spending. The records request also revealed that Turner:

  • Spent $4,189 on a campus address, which is an annual speech each campus governor is required to give
  • Spent $5,000 on ponchos that were meant for the football season but arrived after it was over

The amount of money put into his campus address was especially concerning, as former Boca campus Gov. Der’Resha Bastien spent $184 on her campus address.

That means that Turner spent almost 23 times more money on his speech than Bastien.

The quality of SG programs will have to be sacrificed because of Turner’s handling of A&S fees.

And I do not think Turner has hosted a single successful event that was dedicated to the betterment of the student body.

His $36,000 budget is not his money. It’s the students’ money, and we entrusted him with our wallets only to be taken advantage of.

Turner and the rest of SG let the student body down

Along with many other students, I supported Turner when he first ran for office

From initiatives to include on-campus Chick-fil-A breakfast options to his claim that he was the best candidate to provide for the students, Turner had a great campaign message and even greater promises.

But these were promises he failed to live up to.

Watching Turner fail to provide for students with their A&S fees is a slap in the face to those who voted to put him in power.

I tried to impeach him, but SG did not believe in me as a student, nor will it believe in you.

It will only believe in the man with power.

Sayd Hussain is a contributing writer with the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email shussain2016@fau.edu.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Book Review: Sy Hersh’s “Reporter” tells of an era of journalism long past, a must-read for any college student

BY
Editor in Chief

Reporter Caleb Owens/THE REVIEW

Very rarely can an autobiography — much less one written in the terse, trademark prose of any longtime reporter — read with the thrill of fiction, replete with behind-the-scenes national security drama from the Nixon administration to the present day.

In fact, there’s about one living person whose life is actually that interesting — Seymour Hersh, the investigative reporter who, from the Vietnam War massacre at My Lai to the so-called War on Terror, has been making America’s darkest military and security secrets available for public scrutiny (or, often, lack thereof). In his memoir, “Reporter,” Hersh, now 81, reflects on a life spent maneuvering adroitly — albeit in his blunt, brazen manner — among Washington D.C.’s most secretive circles, chasing improbable leads across the country and world in pursuit of sources and stories.

Charting successes and mistakes, the memoir reads as a manual on investigative reporting, provided by the field’s finest practitioner. Yet, it does not translate directly into the present-day world of journalism. As Hersh, who at times spent years on a single story, notes in the introduction, “Today’s newspapers and networks simply cannot afford to keep correspondents in the field.”

In the 1960s, when Hersh got his start, though, the world was a different one. Hersh, a native of Chicago’s south side, recounts a youth spent operating a dry cleaning shop and squeezing in classes at the University of Chicago. A dropout of the university’s law school, Hersh stumbled into reporting, quick to observe the media’s self-censoring reluctance to address Chicago’s endemic corruption and racist police brutality. Low-grade reporting gigs continued, whether in Chicago, or, for a year, in South Dakota, until he headed out to D.C.

Hersh didn’t break out with the My Lai story until his 30s, and, as his early life demonstrates, a glamorous career does not necessarily have glamorous beginnings. (Nor does it necessarily require a glamorous educational background, a seeming prerequisite for the best reporting gigs today.) But, to Hersh, these early years were indispensible, highlighting the virtues and pitfalls of an industry that his later years would redefine.

In D.C., Hersh, a brash Midwestern outsider who hardly fit the D.C. culture, established a network of inside sources —whether in the Nixon White House or the C.I.A. — that would last the duration of his career. He goes into detail about chasing his My Lai story — soon to alter history and the war — as a freelance journalist, requiring a tenacity that brought him to Las Vegas and led him meandering around a military base. With the My Lai breakthrough, his career was set on the trajectory that threw him into the thick of Nixon-era reporting, making him a central player at The New York Times in the post-Watergate frenzy.

Fiercely unrelenting in his pursuit of both truth and autonomy in unmasking it, Hersh recounts his conflicted relationships with editors, whether Abe Rosenthal of the 1970s Times or, more recently, with David Remnick at The New Yorker, describing the difficulties of penetrating standard media narratives with controversial, and simply depressing, reporting. Hersh’s heavy reliance on anonymous sources, as well as his rogue style, repeatedly challenged editorial norms but generally prevailed.

It’s impossible for any aspiring reporter to read of Hersh’s life without envy and nostalgia. The off-the-record lunches with unnamed officials, the spontaneous flights across the country, the standoffs with men like Henry Kissinger. The memoir reminds of a different era of journalism, one where damning investigative reports led to changes from the White House, and where they could be pursued in full, rather than published the moment a leak is released.

Yet, with nearly every major story, Hersh notes that popularity did not follow. The press, it seems, even at its height, has been forever embattled. The difference between then and now is that it was, even if unpopular, respected.

Hersh leaves untold how he grappled with the many, more practical concerns that plague future journalists. How was the stress managed? How was it possible to have a wife and three kids while being one of the most prolific journalists in history? How were the mortgage payments kept up with? It’s questions like these that are turning would-be reporters to law school and bogus PR gigs. But one can hardly blame Hersh for leaving such topics unaddressed — in reading, it’s evident that telling the story, and telling it right, would not be interfered with by stress or money. Perhaps this is his implicit answer to such questions.

And, in this sense, the book’s most striking revelations surround Hersh’s unwavering integrity and conviction. During the post-Watergate rivalry between The New York Times and The Washington Post, Hersh describes a relationship with Bob Woodward, the Post’s investigative counterpart, in which both Hersh and Woodward had an interest in ensuring that the government was held accountable, no matter who got the byline. He describes respecting sources, and taking extreme pains to ensure the veracity of what he wrote. In today’s world, where “journalists” often set out to be celebrities, and where, at the expense of fact-checking and quality content, publications race to publish first, such anecdotes are instructive.

Hersh also avoids banal appeals to destiny and some deeper driving philosophy, something that, in the age of “doing what you love,” most college students search for in futility before pursuing any career, and a mantra that plagues journalistic “storytellers” in particular. Although it at times seems as though Hersh were born for the reporting he did, or that he must have been driven by some deep and sophisticated search for truth, the reality is that Hersh stumbled into the field because it was the practical thing to do, and that he was often just “doing his job.”

From today’s vantage, with the media distrusted and in decline, Hersh’s biography, most importantly, points to the invaluable role of journalism in unveiling a history now taken for granted, from government research into biological weapons, to My Lai, to debunking the mythology surrounding Henry Kissinger, to U.S. torture at Abu Ghraib. “Reporter” reveals an era that aspiring journalists today, in a world where commentary is confused with coverage and in which “news” is entertainment, need to study intently.

Aspiring journalist or not, though, all Americans would do well to read this book and remind themselves — or learn for the first time — of the vital importance of a free press, today frequently finding its members murdered or behind bars, both of which we ought to be thankful that Hersh managed (somehow) to avoid.

The post Book Review: Sy Hersh’s “Reporter” tells of an era of journalism long past, a must-read for any college student appeared first on The Review.

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Book Review: Sy Hersh’s “Reporter” tells of an era of journalism long past, a must-read for any college student

BY
Editor in Chief

Reporter Caleb Owens/THE REVIEW

Very rarely can an autobiography — much less one written in the terse, trademark prose of any longtime reporter — read with the thrill of fiction, replete with behind-the-scenes national security drama from the Nixon administration to the present day.

In fact, there’s about one living person whose life is actually that interesting — Seymour Hersh, the investigative reporter who, from the Vietnam War massacre at My Lai to the so-called War on Terror, has been making America’s darkest military and security secrets available for public scrutiny (or, often, lack thereof). In his memoir, “Reporter,” Hersh, now 81, reflects on a life spent maneuvering adroitly — albeit in his blunt, brazen manner — among Washington D.C.’s most secretive circles, chasing improbable leads across the country and world in pursuit of sources and stories.

Charting successes and mistakes, the memoir reads as a manual on investigative reporting, provided by the field’s finest practitioner. Yet, it does not translate directly into the present-day world of journalism. As Hersh, who at times spent years on a single story, notes in the introduction, “Today’s newspapers and networks simply cannot afford to keep correspondents in the field.”

In the 1960s, when Hersh got his start, though, the world was a different one. Hersh, a native of Chicago’s south side, recounts a youth spent operating a dry cleaning shop and squeezing in classes at the University of Chicago. A dropout of the university’s law school, Hersh stumbled into reporting, quick to observe the media’s self-censoring reluctance to address Chicago’s endemic corruption and racist police brutality. Low-grade reporting gigs continued, whether in Chicago, or, for a year, in South Dakota, until he headed out to D.C.

Hersh didn’t break out with the My Lai story until his 30s, and, as his early life demonstrates, a glamorous career does not necessarily have glamorous beginnings. (Nor does it necessarily require a glamorous educational background, a seeming prerequisite for the best reporting gigs today.) But, to Hersh, these early years were indispensible, highlighting the virtues and pitfalls of an industry that his later years would redefine.

In D.C., Hersh, a brash Midwestern outsider who hardly fit the D.C. culture, established a network of inside sources —whether in the Nixon White House or the C.I.A. — that would last the duration of his career. He goes into detail about chasing his My Lai story — soon to alter history and the war — as a freelance journalist, requiring a tenacity that brought him to Las Vegas and led him meandering around a military base. With the My Lai breakthrough, his career was set on the trajectory that threw him into the thick of Nixon-era reporting, making him a central player at The New York Times in the post-Watergate frenzy.

Fiercely unrelenting in his pursuit of both truth and autonomy in unmasking it, Hersh recounts his conflicted relationships with editors, whether Abe Rosenthal of the 1970s Times or, more recently, with David Remnick at The New Yorker, describing the difficulties of penetrating standard media narratives with controversial, and simply depressing, reporting. Hersh’s heavy reliance on anonymous sources, as well as his rogue style, repeatedly challenged editorial norms but generally prevailed.

It’s impossible for any aspiring reporter to read of Hersh’s life without envy and nostalgia. The off-the-record lunches with unnamed officials, the spontaneous flights across the country, the standoffs with men like Henry Kissinger. The memoir reminds of a different era of journalism, one where damning investigative reports led to changes from the White House, and where they could be pursued in full, rather than published the moment a leak is released.

Yet, with nearly every major story, Hersh notes that popularity did not follow. The press, it seems, even at its height, has been forever embattled. The difference between then and now is that it was, even if unpopular, respected.

Hersh leaves untold how he grappled with the many, more practical concerns that plague future journalists. How was the stress managed? How was it possible to have a wife and three kids while being one of the most prolific journalists in history? How were the mortgage payments kept up with? It’s questions like these that are turning would-be reporters to law school and bogus PR gigs. But one can hardly blame Hersh for leaving such topics unaddressed — in reading, it’s evident that telling the story, and telling it right, would not be interfered with by stress or money. Perhaps this is his implicit answer to such questions.

And, in this sense, the book’s most striking revelations surround Hersh’s unwavering integrity and conviction. During the post-Watergate rivalry between The New York Times and The Washington Post, Hersh describes a relationship with Bob Woodward, the Post’s investigative counterpart, in which both Hersh and Woodward had an interest in ensuring that the government was held accountable, no matter who got the byline. He describes respecting sources, and taking extreme pains to ensure the veracity of what he wrote. In today’s world, where “journalists” often set out to be celebrities, and where, at the expense of fact-checking and quality content, publications race to publish first, such anecdotes are instructive.

Hersh also avoids banal appeals to destiny and some deeper driving philosophy, something that, in the age of “doing what you love,” most college students search for in futility before pursuing any career, and a mantra that plagues journalistic “storytellers” in particular. Although it at times seems as though Hersh were born for the reporting he did, or that he must have been driven by some deep and sophisticated search for truth, the reality is that Hersh stumbled into the field because it was the practical thing to do, and that he was often just “doing his job.”

From today’s vantage, with the media distrusted and in decline, Hersh’s biography, most importantly, points to the invaluable role of journalism in unveiling a history now taken for granted, from government research into biological weapons, to My Lai, to debunking the mythology surrounding Henry Kissinger, to U.S. torture at Abu Ghraib. “Reporter” reveals an era that aspiring journalists today, in a world where commentary is confused with coverage and in which “news” is entertainment, need to study intently.

Aspiring journalist or not, though, all Americans would do well to read this book and remind themselves — or learn for the first time — of the vital importance of a free press, today frequently finding its members murdered or behind bars, both of which we ought to be thankful that Hersh managed (somehow) to avoid.

The post Book Review: Sy Hersh’s “Reporter” tells of an era of journalism long past, a must-read for any college student appeared first on The Review.

***

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GALLERY: Celebration in the Oaks

lights.jpg

Trees boast their green lights as families navigate through the paths of Celebration in the Oaks. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

walkway.jpg

Bright lights illuminate the path to Celebration in the Oaks. The festival is in its 32nd year of lighting up the holidays. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

strolling.jpg

Couples stroll through the Celebration's garden of mushrooms, insects and other fantastic forest-themed lights. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

trains.jpg

Families gather around to watch the toy trains and streetcars roll through a New Orleans-themed track. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

kiss.jpg

Loved ones stop and take a moment to capture kisses on camera at one of the Merry Kissmas booths throughout the Celebration. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

poinsettias.jpg

Poinsettias form a large Christmas tree in the middle of the botanical gardens. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

vines.jpg

Vines weave in and out of the lights hanging on the trees. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

oyster.jpg

Children watch as an oyster shows off its luminescent pearl. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

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Lights spelling 'peace' hang from an oak tree, giving the name Christmas in the Oaks its meaning. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

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A gecko slithers up one of the big oak trees in celebration of his favorite holiday. Photo credit: Madison Mcloughlin

Every holiday season, City Park is decorated in lights.

The post GALLERY: Celebration in the Oaks appeared first on The Maroon.

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Herd conquers Bulls in Gasparilla Bowl, extends bowl win streak

TAMPA, Fla. – Marshall football’s bowl game win streak reached seven games Thursday night, as the Thundering Herd (9-4, 6-2 C-USA) defeated South Florida (7-6, 3-5 American), 38-20, in the Bad Boy Mowers Gasparilla Bowl at Raymond James Stadium.

 

Head coach Doc Holliday, who is a perfect 6-0 in bowl games at Marshall, said, “The ones you win are the ones you remember. There’s nothing like that locker room after a bowl game win. Fortunately, we’ve had six straight that have been happy locker rooms. There’s nothing better than that.”

 

After a slow start to the first quarter, Marshall’s offense came alive on an 81-yard drive capped by Isaiah Green’s first career rushing touchdown – a 10-yard run off the left edge. That touchdown run was set up by a trick play as Green pitched it to Marcel Williams, who threw back across the field to Green, who then found Xavier Gaines for a 27-yard gain.

 

The Thundering Herd doubled its lead 37 seconds later after a bad snap was recovered by Darius Hodge and returned to the USF 1-yard line. Anthony Anderson scored on the ensuing play, leaping over the line to push Marshall’s lead to 14-0.

 

South Florida got on the board using a trick play, as Tyre McCants found Randall St. Felix for a 38-yard touchdown on a wide receiver pass. The Herd quickly answered that with an 80-yard drive capped by an 8-yard TD by Brenden Knox to take a 21-7 lead after one quarter.

 

Marshall added to its lead late in the second quarter when Keion Davis scored on a 5-yard touchdown run, padding the Herd’s lead to 28-7.

 

“It was as simple as that,” Davis said. “(Cain Madden) made the block and I finished the run.”

 

South Florida tacked on a field goal just before halftime to send the teams to the locker room with the Herd in front, 28-10.

 

USF opened the second half with a long drive that lasted nearly six minutes but only mustered a field goal out of it. Marshall responded with a Justin Rohrwasser 28-yard field goal to increase its lead to 31-13.

 

South Florida cut the Herd’s lead to 31-20 late in the third quarter, as Blake Barnett connected with St. Felix for his second touchdown reception of the game.

 

The Herd iced the game in the fourth quarter when Davis scored on a 16-yard run to extend the lead to 38-20. Marshall’s defense kept USF’s offense in check and closed out the 12th bowl win in program history. Davis, who was named the game’s most valuable player, finished with 94 yards and a pair of touchdowns on the ground and added 77 yards on kick returns.

 

“Keion is a special player,” Holliday said. “He’s been that way, he makes things happen every time he gets the opportunity. I’m proud of him and the way he went in there and stepped up when he had to make plays.”

 

USF’s offense, which was averaging nearly 450 yards per game, was limited to 360 yards and was 4-for-15 on third down conversions. Marshall had four sacks of Barnett, including two by Channing Hames, who was the 2017 New Mexico Bowl Defensive MVP.

 

USF head coach Charlie Strong said, “There’s a lot of work that has to be done for this program, and we got to go get it done, we need to coach better and we got to play better, and there’s a lot to be done.”

 

Marshall finished its season with nine wins, marking the fourth time under Holliday that the Thundering Herd reached that mark.

 

The Herd sent its 17 seniors out the only way the team wanted to: with a win.

 

***

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Herd conquers Bulls in Gasparilla Bowl, extends bowl win streak

TAMPA, Fla. – Marshall football’s bowl game win streak reached seven games Thursday night, as the Thundering Herd (9-4, 6-2 C-USA) defeated South Florida (7-6, 3-5 American), 38-20, in the Bad Boy Mowers Gasparilla Bowl at Raymond James Stadium.

 

Head coach Doc Holliday, who is a perfect 6-0 in bowl games at Marshall, said, “The ones you win are the ones you remember. There’s nothing like that locker room after a bowl game win. Fortunately, we’ve had six straight that have been happy locker rooms. There’s nothing better than that.”

 

After a slow start to the first quarter, Marshall’s offense came alive on an 81-yard drive capped by Isaiah Green’s first career rushing touchdown – a 10-yard run off the left edge. That touchdown run was set up by a trick play as Green pitched it to Marcel Williams, who threw back across the field to Green, who then found Xavier Gaines for a 27-yard gain.

 

The Thundering Herd doubled its lead 37 seconds later after a bad snap was recovered by Darius Hodge and returned to the USF 1-yard line. Anthony Anderson scored on the ensuing play, leaping over the line to push Marshall’s lead to 14-0.

 

South Florida got on the board using a trick play, as Tyre McCants found Randall St. Felix for a 38-yard touchdown on a wide receiver pass. The Herd quickly answered that with an 80-yard drive capped by an 8-yard TD by Brenden Knox to take a 21-7 lead after one quarter.

 

Marshall added to its lead late in the second quarter when Keion Davis scored on a 5-yard touchdown run, padding the Herd’s lead to 28-7.

 

“It was as simple as that,” Davis said. “(Cain Madden) made the block and I finished the run.”

 

South Florida tacked on a field goal just before halftime to send the teams to the locker room with the Herd in front, 28-10.

 

USF opened the second half with a long drive that lasted nearly six minutes but only mustered a field goal out of it. Marshall responded with a Justin Rohrwasser 28-yard field goal to increase its lead to 31-13.

 

South Florida cut the Herd’s lead to 31-20 late in the third quarter, as Blake Barnett connected with St. Felix for his second touchdown reception of the game.

 

The Herd iced the game in the fourth quarter when Davis scored on a 16-yard run to extend the lead to 38-20. Marshall’s defense kept USF’s offense in check and closed out the 12th bowl win in program history. Davis, who was named the game’s most valuable player, finished with 94 yards and a pair of touchdowns on the ground and added 77 yards on kick returns.

 

“Keion is a special player,” Holliday said. “He’s been that way, he makes things happen every time he gets the opportunity. I’m proud of him and the way he went in there and stepped up when he had to make plays.”

 

USF’s offense, which was averaging nearly 450 yards per game, was limited to 360 yards and was 4-for-15 on third down conversions. Marshall had four sacks of Barnett, including two by Channing Hames, who was the 2017 New Mexico Bowl Defensive MVP.

 

USF head coach Charlie Strong said, “There’s a lot of work that has to be done for this program, and we got to go get it done, we need to coach better and we got to play better, and there’s a lot to be done.”

 

Marshall finished its season with nine wins, marking the fourth time under Holliday that the Thundering Herd reached that mark.

 

The Herd sent its 17 seniors out the only way the team wanted to: with a win.

 

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Herd conquers Bulls in Gasparilla Bowl, extends bowl win streak

TAMPA, Fla. – Marshall football’s bowl game win streak reached seven games Thursday night, as the Thundering Herd (9-4, 6-2 C-USA) defeated South Florida (7-6, 3-5 American), 38-20, in the Bad Boy Mowers Gasparilla Bowl at Raymond James Stadium.

 

Head coach Doc Holliday, who is a perfect 6-0 in bowl games at Marshall, said, “The ones you win are the ones you remember. There’s nothing like that locker room after a bowl game win. Fortunately, we’ve had six straight that have been happy locker rooms. There’s nothing better than that.”

 

After a slow start to the first quarter, Marshall’s offense came alive on an 81-yard drive capped by Isaiah Green’s first career rushing touchdown – a 10-yard run off the left edge. That touchdown run was set up by a trick play as Green pitched it to Marcel Williams, who threw back across the field to Green, who then found Xavier Gaines for a 27-yard gain.

 

The Thundering Herd doubled its lead 37 seconds later after a bad snap was recovered by Darius Hodge and returned to the USF 1-yard line. Anthony Anderson scored on the ensuing play, leaping over the line to push Marshall’s lead to 14-0.

 

South Florida got on the board using a trick play, as Tyre McCants found Randall St. Felix for a 38-yard touchdown on a wide receiver pass. The Herd quickly answered that with an 80-yard drive capped by an 8-yard TD by Brenden Knox to take a 21-7 lead after one quarter.

 

Marshall added to its lead late in the second quarter when Keion Davis scored on a 5-yard touchdown run, padding the Herd’s lead to 28-7.

 

“It was as simple as that,” Davis said. “(Cain Madden) made the block and I finished the run.”

 

South Florida tacked on a field goal just before halftime to send the teams to the locker room with the Herd in front, 28-10.

 

USF opened the second half with a long drive that lasted nearly six minutes but only mustered a field goal out of it. Marshall responded with a Justin Rohrwasser 28-yard field goal to increase its lead to 31-13.

 

South Florida cut the Herd’s lead to 31-20 late in the third quarter, as Blake Barnett connected with St. Felix for his second touchdown reception of the game.

 

The Herd iced the game in the fourth quarter when Davis scored on a 16-yard run to extend the lead to 38-20. Marshall’s defense kept USF’s offense in check and closed out the 12th bowl win in program history. Davis, who was named the game’s most valuable player, finished with 94 yards and a pair of touchdowns on the ground and added 77 yards on kick returns.

 

“Keion is a special player,” Holliday said. “He’s been that way, he makes things happen every time he gets the opportunity. I’m proud of him and the way he went in there and stepped up when he had to make plays.”

 

USF’s offense, which was averaging nearly 450 yards per game, was limited to 360 yards and was 4-for-15 on third down conversions. Marshall had four sacks of Barnett, including two by Channing Hames, who was the 2017 New Mexico Bowl Defensive MVP.

 

USF head coach Charlie Strong said, “There’s a lot of work that has to be done for this program, and we got to go get it done, we need to coach better and we got to play better, and there’s a lot to be done.”

 

Marshall finished its season with nine wins, marking the fourth time under Holliday that the Thundering Herd reached that mark.

 

The Herd sent its 17 seniors out the only way the team wanted to: with a win.

 

***

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USLAC Protests Custodial Workloads, Demands Hiring of Five Additional Workers

Jordan Saliby, Staff Writer

Jordan Saliby, Staff Writer

On Nov. 29, dozens of protesters gathered outside North College for a rally in support of custodial workers on campus. Holding signs and chanting, the protesters blocked the entrance to the building for almost an hour.

The rally was organized by the United Student/Labor Action Coalition (USLAC) and addressed concerns from students and custodial staff regarding unreasonable workloads and issues with the staff’s treatment on campus.

The event was part of an ongoing discussion of the treatment of custodial workers on campus. It came in the wake of the firing of María Sarabia, a 55-year-old custodian who had worked at Wesleyan’s Freeman Athletic Center for nine years, in August. Sarabia was employed by Service Management Group (SMG), which Wesleyan contracts for janitorial services around campus.

Sarabia, who is diabetic, was fired when her boss caught her taking a break to regain her energy with a cup of coffee. In early October, students organized to raise money for Sarabia, who has sole custody over her four grandchildren, and demand that SMG rehire her. Members of USLAC drafted a petition and delivered over 1,100 signed papers to a meeting of Physical Plant and SMG employees. As of now, the GoFundMe set up for Sarabia has raised almost $7,000.

In an email sent to USLAC member Emma Llano ’19, an SMG member named Louise Linsky addressed Sarabia’s firing and complaints about understaffing in the campus buildings SMG covers. The letter pointed to inaccuracies in Sarabia’s story, which was published in full in the “story” section of the GoFundMe campaign.

“The details that are currently circulating surrounding Maria’s dismissal are grossly inaccurate,” Linksy wrote. “However, if Maria would sign a Release, SMG would be able to provide the documentation related to her termination.”

Llano has been in contact with Sarabia, who told her that she has tried to call SMG’s HR department in order to sign the release but that the department has yet to answer her calls.

Linsky’s email comes as a response to the over-1,100 petitions that were delivered to Physical Plant and SMG staff in October. These petitions called for Sarabia to be rehired and for SMG to bring on five more employees by the end of the school year in order to decrease the workloads of its current staff.

USLAC members see SMG’s response as insufficient and misrepresentative of the realities of Sarabia’s situation. In a Facebook post publicizing the rally, USLAC pointed out Wesleyan’s failure to comment on the matter and what its members see as the unreasonable workloads thrust upon SMG employees.

“Wesleyan did not respond at all, while SMG responded that custodians at Wesleyan have reasonable workloads,” the post read. “As members of the Wesleyan community, we have witnessed the unreasonable workloads of custodians on this campus in our dorms, dining halls, academic buildings, and athletic facilities.”

When USLAC began working with Sarabia, she had already filed a grievance with her union, SEIU 32BJ. The grievance remains unsolved within the union, though, and is currently in arbitration, a process that can take years.

“The corporation and the union can’t come to an agreement,” Llano said. “So then it goes to what is called an arbitration process where a third party will look at both sides and decide what should be the outcome.”

USLAC member Tomás Rogel ’19 believes that the union contract all members sign does not adequately protect workers from unjust termination. He attributes this to the document’s unclear description of what “just cause” for termination means.

“There’s a section [in the union contract] about discharging employees for just cause, but just cause is never actually defined,” Rogel said.

SEIU 32BJ publishes its union contract online, and the termination clause Rogel mentioned is particularly vague.

“The Employer may discharge a member of the bargaining unit for just cause,” the union contract reads.

What constitutes “just cause” for terminating an employee is never explicitly defined in the contract. Therefore, the power to decide what justifies termination in situations like Sarabia’s is ultimately up to the employer. USLAC hopes to change this.

“We do have concerns, in general, from workers that we would like to address with the union,” Rogel said. “So, it’s a relationship in which we want to keep an eye on the union, and making sure they are functioning in the way that a union should, which is in the interest of the worker not the business.”

Another important matter raised by Sarabia’s firing and the protest is how much control the University has over the treatment of contracted labor. In 2000, the University, prompted by a USLAC proposal, introduced the Employment Code for Service Contractors to exert some form of control over the companies it contracts to fill jobs around campus. This document outlined job conditions, types of labor permitted, and employee protections for contracted labor and established a Code Compliance Board to enforce and monitor the code’s provisions.

The Code Compliance Board has not functioned for the past few years, but USLAC members Joy Ming King ’20 and Indigo Cochran ’21 are working with the administration to revive the board’s activities.

The enforcement and monitoring section of the Code states that service contractors must give a copy of the document to all employees.

“Such reference shall require that the service contractor acknowledge that he/she/it has read and understood the code and agrees to be bound by its terms on behalf of itself, its employees, subcontractors and agents,” the Code reads. “Each service contractor will be required to provide this code to its employees, including providing it in languages other than English.”

Cochran believes that service contractors have not distributed this document to their employees.

“We definitely have been meeting with workers and union stewards and know that this code that is supposed to be the set of rules that service contractors follow has not been distributed and has not been edited in years,” Cochran said.

The document was most recently revised in September when information on wages was updated.

Workers, no matter their contractual status, have always been a part of the Wesleyan community. Olin Librarian Andrew White commented on the wonderful services that custodial workers provide for the library but said that he has heard that some buildings on campus are understaffed.

“I’m very happy with the folks who are assigned to Olin, I think they do a fantastic job and they are well-integrated into our staff,” White said. “But I have heard from my staff who are in the Science Library in Exley that there is not enough custodial coverage.”

Linsky responded to claims of understaffing in the email sent to Llano, writing that SMG has always abided by industry standards in assigning workers to campus buildings.

“SMG’s staffing levels on the Wesleyan campus are well within industry standards for APPA level II cleaning standards in a university setting,” the email read. “On the Wesleyan campus the cleanable square foot levels have remained consistent since the inception of our contract.”

Llano and other USLAC members argue that the industry standards should be disregarded in this circumstance since some workers have expressed dissatisfaction with their workloads. They think that more workers should be hired, even if SMG’s staffing levels are within industry standards.

In a USLAC survey of custodial workers, some workers expressed that the work they are expected to do is unreasonable and requires them to work longer hours than they intend to.

One custodial worker reported that she arrives on campus at 7:00 in the morning and is expected to finish cleaning a large part of a building before 8:30, which she sees as an impossible task. She ends up leaving around 10:00 or 11:00 and is then expected to clean an entire dorm building. This is her routine five days per week.

Another employee cited workloads that leave him without a lunch break on his busiest days. He also stated that he is sometimes expected to be on call when he is not on duty.

Following the protest, USLAC members met with President Michael Roth to discuss their demands that the University hire an additional five custodial workers by the end of the academic year. In a statement released by USLAC on Dec. 10, the organization reported that the University will be responding to their demands shortly.

“On Monday, three USLAC student representatives met with President Roth, who at the meeting agreed to respond to USLAC within a week with a timeline for how the administration will respond to our demands,” the statement compiled by Llano, Sophie Martin ’19, and Maia Reumann-Moore ’19 reads. “Michael Roth has gotten in contact with the administrators in charge of finance who will be investigating the issue over the break. We have scheduled a meeting with him early next semester to discuss the results of this investigation and steps moving forward.”

While the University may be working to address some of USLAC’s demands, Sarabia’s termination and case with her union remain unresolved. As written in the USLAC statement, there is still time for the Wesleyan community and SMG managers to take actions to rehire her.

“As of today, María Sarabia, whose case started this movement, is still out of a job,” the statement reads. “The Wesleyan administration does not have much power over individual employees and their responses are slow. We want to get Maria employed as soon as possible, so we want to urge students, staff, and faculty to call Gisela at SMG Human Resource and demand that SMG hire Maria at one of their open positions.”

Sarabia’s case with her union remains in arbitration, but USLAC points out that there are simple ways in which students can show their solidarity with Wesleyan’s custodial staff.

“A lot of the time, workers would like recognition,” Llano said. “Even starting a conversation, or just being conscious of the workers goes a long way.”

 

Jordan Saliby can be reached at jsaliby@wesleyan.edu.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

USLAC Protests Custodial Workloads, Demands Hiring of Five Additional Workers

Jordan Saliby, Staff Writer

Jordan Saliby, Staff Writer

On Nov. 29, dozens of protesters gathered outside North College for a rally in support of custodial workers on campus. Holding signs and chanting, the protesters blocked the entrance to the building for almost an hour.

The rally was organized by the United Student/Labor Action Coalition (USLAC) and addressed concerns from students and custodial staff regarding unreasonable workloads and issues with the staff’s treatment on campus.

The event was part of an ongoing discussion of the treatment of custodial workers on campus. It came in the wake of the firing of María Sarabia, a 55-year-old custodian who had worked at Wesleyan’s Freeman Athletic Center for nine years, in August. Sarabia was employed by Service Management Group (SMG), which Wesleyan contracts for janitorial services around campus.

Sarabia, who is diabetic, was fired when her boss caught her taking a break to regain her energy with a cup of coffee. In early October, students organized to raise money for Sarabia, who has sole custody over her four grandchildren, and demand that SMG rehire her. Members of USLAC drafted a petition and delivered over 1,100 signed papers to a meeting of Physical Plant and SMG employees. As of now, the GoFundMe set up for Sarabia has raised almost $7,000.

In an email sent to USLAC member Emma Llano ’19, an SMG member named Louise Linsky addressed Sarabia’s firing and complaints about understaffing in the campus buildings SMG covers. The letter pointed to inaccuracies in Sarabia’s story, which was published in full in the “story” section of the GoFundMe campaign.

“The details that are currently circulating surrounding Maria’s dismissal are grossly inaccurate,” Linksy wrote. “However, if Maria would sign a Release, SMG would be able to provide the documentation related to her termination.”

Llano has been in contact with Sarabia, who told her that she has tried to call SMG’s HR department in order to sign the release but that the department has yet to answer her calls.

Linsky’s email comes as a response to the over-1,100 petitions that were delivered to Physical Plant and SMG staff in October. These petitions called for Sarabia to be rehired and for SMG to bring on five more employees by the end of the school year in order to decrease the workloads of its current staff.

USLAC members see SMG’s response as insufficient and misrepresentative of the realities of Sarabia’s situation. In a Facebook post publicizing the rally, USLAC pointed out Wesleyan’s failure to comment on the matter and what its members see as the unreasonable workloads thrust upon SMG employees.

“Wesleyan did not respond at all, while SMG responded that custodians at Wesleyan have reasonable workloads,” the post read. “As members of the Wesleyan community, we have witnessed the unreasonable workloads of custodians on this campus in our dorms, dining halls, academic buildings, and athletic facilities.”

When USLAC began working with Sarabia, she had already filed a grievance with her union, SEIU 32BJ. The grievance remains unsolved within the union, though, and is currently in arbitration, a process that can take years.

“The corporation and the union can’t come to an agreement,” Llano said. “So then it goes to what is called an arbitration process where a third party will look at both sides and decide what should be the outcome.”

USLAC member Tomás Rogel ’19 believes that the union contract all members sign does not adequately protect workers from unjust termination. He attributes this to the document’s unclear description of what “just cause” for termination means.

“There’s a section [in the union contract] about discharging employees for just cause, but just cause is never actually defined,” Rogel said.

SEIU 32BJ publishes its union contract online, and the termination clause Rogel mentioned is particularly vague.

“The Employer may discharge a member of the bargaining unit for just cause,” the union contract reads.

What constitutes “just cause” for terminating an employee is never explicitly defined in the contract. Therefore, the power to decide what justifies termination in situations like Sarabia’s is ultimately up to the employer. USLAC hopes to change this.

“We do have concerns, in general, from workers that we would like to address with the union,” Rogel said. “So, it’s a relationship in which we want to keep an eye on the union, and making sure they are functioning in the way that a union should, which is in the interest of the worker not the business.”

Another important matter raised by Sarabia’s firing and the protest is how much control the University has over the treatment of contracted labor. In 2000, the University, prompted by a USLAC proposal, introduced the Employment Code for Service Contractors to exert some form of control over the companies it contracts to fill jobs around campus. This document outlined job conditions, types of labor permitted, and employee protections for contracted labor and established a Code Compliance Board to enforce and monitor the code’s provisions.

The Code Compliance Board has not functioned for the past few years, but USLAC members Joy Ming King ’20 and Indigo Cochran ’21 are working with the administration to revive the board’s activities.

The enforcement and monitoring section of the Code states that service contractors must give a copy of the document to all employees.

“Such reference shall require that the service contractor acknowledge that he/she/it has read and understood the code and agrees to be bound by its terms on behalf of itself, its employees, subcontractors and agents,” the Code reads. “Each service contractor will be required to provide this code to its employees, including providing it in languages other than English.”

Cochran believes that service contractors have not distributed this document to their employees.

“We definitely have been meeting with workers and union stewards and know that this code that is supposed to be the set of rules that service contractors follow has not been distributed and has not been edited in years,” Cochran said.

The document was most recently revised in September when information on wages was updated.

Workers, no matter their contractual status, have always been a part of the Wesleyan community. Olin Librarian Andrew White commented on the wonderful services that custodial workers provide for the library but said that he has heard that some buildings on campus are understaffed.

“I’m very happy with the folks who are assigned to Olin, I think they do a fantastic job and they are well-integrated into our staff,” White said. “But I have heard from my staff who are in the Science Library in Exley that there is not enough custodial coverage.”

Linsky responded to claims of understaffing in the email sent to Llano, writing that SMG has always abided by industry standards in assigning workers to campus buildings.

“SMG’s staffing levels on the Wesleyan campus are well within industry standards for APPA level II cleaning standards in a university setting,” the email read. “On the Wesleyan campus the cleanable square foot levels have remained consistent since the inception of our contract.”

Llano and other USLAC members argue that the industry standards should be disregarded in this circumstance since some workers have expressed dissatisfaction with their workloads. They think that more workers should be hired, even if SMG’s staffing levels are within industry standards.

In a USLAC survey of custodial workers, some workers expressed that the work they are expected to do is unreasonable and requires them to work longer hours than they intend to.

One custodial worker reported that she arrives on campus at 7:00 in the morning and is expected to finish cleaning a large part of a building before 8:30, which she sees as an impossible task. She ends up leaving around 10:00 or 11:00 and is then expected to clean an entire dorm building. This is her routine five days per week.

Another employee cited workloads that leave him without a lunch break on his busiest days. He also stated that he is sometimes expected to be on call when he is not on duty.

Following the protest, USLAC members met with President Michael Roth to discuss their demands that the University hire an additional five custodial workers by the end of the academic year. In a statement released by USLAC on Dec. 10, the organization reported that the University will be responding to their demands shortly.

“On Monday, three USLAC student representatives met with President Roth, who at the meeting agreed to respond to USLAC within a week with a timeline for how the administration will respond to our demands,” the statement compiled by Llano, Sophie Martin ’19, and Maia Reumann-Moore ’19 reads. “Michael Roth has gotten in contact with the administrators in charge of finance who will be investigating the issue over the break. We have scheduled a meeting with him early next semester to discuss the results of this investigation and steps moving forward.”

While the University may be working to address some of USLAC’s demands, Sarabia’s termination and case with her union remain unresolved. As written in the USLAC statement, there is still time for the Wesleyan community and SMG managers to take actions to rehire her.

“As of today, María Sarabia, whose case started this movement, is still out of a job,” the statement reads. “The Wesleyan administration does not have much power over individual employees and their responses are slow. We want to get Maria employed as soon as possible, so we want to urge students, staff, and faculty to call Gisela at SMG Human Resource and demand that SMG hire Maria at one of their open positions.”

Sarabia’s case with her union remains in arbitration, but USLAC points out that there are simple ways in which students can show their solidarity with Wesleyan’s custodial staff.

“A lot of the time, workers would like recognition,” Llano said. “Even starting a conversation, or just being conscious of the workers goes a long way.”

 

Jordan Saliby can be reached at jsaliby@wesleyan.edu.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

USLAC Protests Custodial Workloads, Demands Hiring of Five Additional Workers

Jordan Saliby, Staff Writer

Jordan Saliby, Staff Writer

On Nov. 29, dozens of protesters gathered outside North College for a rally in support of custodial workers on campus. Holding signs and chanting, the protesters blocked the entrance to the building for almost an hour.

The rally was organized by the United Student/Labor Action Coalition (USLAC) and addressed concerns from students and custodial staff regarding unreasonable workloads and issues with the staff’s treatment on campus.

The event was part of an ongoing discussion of the treatment of custodial workers on campus. It came in the wake of the firing of María Sarabia, a 55-year-old custodian who had worked at Wesleyan’s Freeman Athletic Center for nine years, in August. Sarabia was employed by Service Management Group (SMG), which Wesleyan contracts for janitorial services around campus.

Sarabia, who is diabetic, was fired when her boss caught her taking a break to regain her energy with a cup of coffee. In early October, students organized to raise money for Sarabia, who has sole custody over her four grandchildren, and demand that SMG rehire her. Members of USLAC drafted a petition and delivered over 1,100 signed papers to a meeting of Physical Plant and SMG employees. As of now, the GoFundMe set up for Sarabia has raised almost $7,000.

In an email sent to USLAC member Emma Llano ’19, an SMG member named Louise Linsky addressed Sarabia’s firing and complaints about understaffing in the campus buildings SMG covers. The letter pointed to inaccuracies in Sarabia’s story, which was published in full in the “story” section of the GoFundMe campaign.

“The details that are currently circulating surrounding Maria’s dismissal are grossly inaccurate,” Linksy wrote. “However, if Maria would sign a Release, SMG would be able to provide the documentation related to her termination.”

Llano has been in contact with Sarabia, who told her that she has tried to call SMG’s HR department in order to sign the release but that the department has yet to answer her calls.

Linsky’s email comes as a response to the over-1,100 petitions that were delivered to Physical Plant and SMG staff in October. These petitions called for Sarabia to be rehired and for SMG to bring on five more employees by the end of the school year in order to decrease the workloads of its current staff.

USLAC members see SMG’s response as insufficient and misrepresentative of the realities of Sarabia’s situation. In a Facebook post publicizing the rally, USLAC pointed out Wesleyan’s failure to comment on the matter and what its members see as the unreasonable workloads thrust upon SMG employees.

“Wesleyan did not respond at all, while SMG responded that custodians at Wesleyan have reasonable workloads,” the post read. “As members of the Wesleyan community, we have witnessed the unreasonable workloads of custodians on this campus in our dorms, dining halls, academic buildings, and athletic facilities.”

When USLAC began working with Sarabia, she had already filed a grievance with her union, SEIU 32BJ. The grievance remains unsolved within the union, though, and is currently in arbitration, a process that can take years.

“The corporation and the union can’t come to an agreement,” Llano said. “So then it goes to what is called an arbitration process where a third party will look at both sides and decide what should be the outcome.”

USLAC member Tomás Rogel ’19 believes that the union contract all members sign does not adequately protect workers from unjust termination. He attributes this to the document’s unclear description of what “just cause” for termination means.

“There’s a section [in the union contract] about discharging employees for just cause, but just cause is never actually defined,” Rogel said.

SEIU 32BJ publishes its union contract online, and the termination clause Rogel mentioned is particularly vague.

“The Employer may discharge a member of the bargaining unit for just cause,” the union contract reads.

What constitutes “just cause” for terminating an employee is never explicitly defined in the contract. Therefore, the power to decide what justifies termination in situations like Sarabia’s is ultimately up to the employer. USLAC hopes to change this.

“We do have concerns, in general, from workers that we would like to address with the union,” Rogel said. “So, it’s a relationship in which we want to keep an eye on the union, and making sure they are functioning in the way that a union should, which is in the interest of the worker not the business.”

Another important matter raised by Sarabia’s firing and the protest is how much control the University has over the treatment of contracted labor. In 2000, the University, prompted by a USLAC proposal, introduced the Employment Code for Service Contractors to exert some form of control over the companies it contracts to fill jobs around campus. This document outlined job conditions, types of labor permitted, and employee protections for contracted labor and established a Code Compliance Board to enforce and monitor the code’s provisions.

The Code Compliance Board has not functioned for the past few years, but USLAC members Joy Ming King ’20 and Indigo Cochran ’21 are working with the administration to revive the board’s activities.

The enforcement and monitoring section of the Code states that service contractors must give a copy of the document to all employees.

“Such reference shall require that the service contractor acknowledge that he/she/it has read and understood the code and agrees to be bound by its terms on behalf of itself, its employees, subcontractors and agents,” the Code reads. “Each service contractor will be required to provide this code to its employees, including providing it in languages other than English.”

Cochran believes that service contractors have not distributed this document to their employees.

“We definitely have been meeting with workers and union stewards and know that this code that is supposed to be the set of rules that service contractors follow has not been distributed and has not been edited in years,” Cochran said.

The document was most recently revised in September when information on wages was updated.

Workers, no matter their contractual status, have always been a part of the Wesleyan community. Olin Librarian Andrew White commented on the wonderful services that custodial workers provide for the library but said that he has heard that some buildings on campus are understaffed.

“I’m very happy with the folks who are assigned to Olin, I think they do a fantastic job and they are well-integrated into our staff,” White said. “But I have heard from my staff who are in the Science Library in Exley that there is not enough custodial coverage.”

Linsky responded to claims of understaffing in the email sent to Llano, writing that SMG has always abided by industry standards in assigning workers to campus buildings.

“SMG’s staffing levels on the Wesleyan campus are well within industry standards for APPA level II cleaning standards in a university setting,” the email read. “On the Wesleyan campus the cleanable square foot levels have remained consistent since the inception of our contract.”

Llano and other USLAC members argue that the industry standards should be disregarded in this circumstance since some workers have expressed dissatisfaction with their workloads. They think that more workers should be hired, even if SMG’s staffing levels are within industry standards.

In a USLAC survey of custodial workers, some workers expressed that the work they are expected to do is unreasonable and requires them to work longer hours than they intend to.

One custodial worker reported that she arrives on campus at 7:00 in the morning and is expected to finish cleaning a large part of a building before 8:30, which she sees as an impossible task. She ends up leaving around 10:00 or 11:00 and is then expected to clean an entire dorm building. This is her routine five days per week.

Another employee cited workloads that leave him without a lunch break on his busiest days. He also stated that he is sometimes expected to be on call when he is not on duty.

Following the protest, USLAC members met with President Michael Roth to discuss their demands that the University hire an additional five custodial workers by the end of the academic year. In a statement released by USLAC on Dec. 10, the organization reported that the University will be responding to their demands shortly.

“On Monday, three USLAC student representatives met with President Roth, who at the meeting agreed to respond to USLAC within a week with a timeline for how the administration will respond to our demands,” the statement compiled by Llano, Sophie Martin ’19, and Maia Reumann-Moore ’19 reads. “Michael Roth has gotten in contact with the administrators in charge of finance who will be investigating the issue over the break. We have scheduled a meeting with him early next semester to discuss the results of this investigation and steps moving forward.”

While the University may be working to address some of USLAC’s demands, Sarabia’s termination and case with her union remain unresolved. As written in the USLAC statement, there is still time for the Wesleyan community and SMG managers to take actions to rehire her.

“As of today, María Sarabia, whose case started this movement, is still out of a job,” the statement reads. “The Wesleyan administration does not have much power over individual employees and their responses are slow. We want to get Maria employed as soon as possible, so we want to urge students, staff, and faculty to call Gisela at SMG Human Resource and demand that SMG hire Maria at one of their open positions.”

Sarabia’s case with her union remains in arbitration, but USLAC points out that there are simple ways in which students can show their solidarity with Wesleyan’s custodial staff.

“A lot of the time, workers would like recognition,” Llano said. “Even starting a conversation, or just being conscious of the workers goes a long way.”

 

Jordan Saliby can be reached at jsaliby@wesleyan.edu.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Music Teacher Gives East and South L.A. Students Opportunities He Missed

As a child, Timothy Maloof loved classical music but his family couldn’t afford lessons for him to learn how to play an instrument. Still, he vowed to someday be a musician.

Not only did he achieve his dream, but he now teaches music to students in underserved communities. One of those students is Salma Shannon, who grew up in South Los Angeles.

This is the story of how they learned from each other and formed a lifelong bond.

Classical music for everyone

Maloof, who has been teaching music on and off for more than a dozen years, works in afterschool programs at the Los Angeles Music and Art School in the Eastside and Watts-Willowbrook Conservatory in South L.A.

“I remember Timothy 15 years ago, jumping on his [motorcycle], violin on his back, heading to a school program to teach violin to low-income kids,” said Xavier Pilsudski, a film actor and editor who worked on a short film that Maloof composed music for. “Timothy believes that classical music shouldn’t be for elite kids only.”

Maloof worked as a dishwasher and a cook in various restaurants to pay his way through school, eventually earning two bachelor’s degrees and this year, a master’s degree in music from California State University, Los Angeles. In addition to teaching in the afterschool programs and giving private music and violin lessons, Maloof performs in several ensembles, Bedouin X, the Los Angeles Arab Orchestra and Qamar, an Arabic, jazz and rock fusion band.

But he says he’s most passionate about helping students like Shannon and seeing them learn, grow and eventually succeed in life and their careers.

Overcoming doubts

Shannon started getting music lessons from Maloof when she was 12. Through programs she and Maloof participated in, Shannon received several years of guided music lessons free of charge. The two spent even more time, many hours per week, when she was in middle school, hoping to study at LACHSA, the Los Angeles County High School of the Arts.

On the afternoon of the audition, Salma’s uncle dropped her off, along with her mom.

As she walked toward LACHSA’s big orchestra room, she could see three judges in it and could hear other students practicing.

The melodies all around her, which would usually calm her, made her nervous. The other students were amazing.

“Am I going to be as good as them?” she recalled thinking. Thousands of hours of practice came down to this moment.

Walking into the audition room, she picked up her violin, hands trembling.

As she started playing, her confidence grew. The 5-minute audition felt much shorter. The audition seemed to go well. She hoped the judges thought so, too.

About a week after the audition, her mom had already left for work when Salma awoke, around 6 a.m. A sticky note next to her bed immediately caught her eye. Decorated with a smiley face, it read in her mom’s handwriting: “Congratulations! You got in.”

She could almost feel her heart swell with pride and a rush of emotions set in. She did it.

A lifelong bond

Maloof recalled how much joy it brought to him as well. And he remembers a special moment with her at the Watts-Willowbrook Conservatory soon after.

It was his birthday and he was enjoying how 14-year-old Shannon could freely coordinate her body moments with the tune of her music: Her forearm, upper arm, fingers and wrist were in perfect harmony with the melody of her violin.

Teaching her and hearing her play was a true gift, he thought.

At the end of class that day, as he was wrapping up and preparing to leave the classroom, he heard footsteps approaching his desk. He looked over his shoulder and saw Shannon and her mother.

“I know you will like it. It is your favorite color,” Salma said, handing him an orange tie as her mother thanked him for all he does.

It’s my pleasure, he replied.

The gesture warmed his heart and made it a birthday he’ll always remember.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Music Teacher Gives East and South L.A. Students Opportunities He Missed

As a child, Timothy Maloof loved classical music but his family couldn’t afford lessons for him to learn how to play an instrument. Still, he vowed to someday be a musician.

Not only did he achieve his dream, but he now teaches music to students in underserved communities. One of those students is Salma Shannon, who grew up in South Los Angeles.

This is the story of how they learned from each other and formed a lifelong bond.

Classical music for everyone

Maloof, who has been teaching music on and off for more than a dozen years, works in afterschool programs at the Los Angeles Music and Art School in the Eastside and Watts-Willowbrook Conservatory in South L.A.

“I remember Timothy 15 years ago, jumping on his [motorcycle], violin on his back, heading to a school program to teach violin to low-income kids,” said Xavier Pilsudski, a film actor and editor who worked on a short film that Maloof composed music for. “Timothy believes that classical music shouldn’t be for elite kids only.”

Maloof worked as a dishwasher and a cook in various restaurants to pay his way through school, eventually earning two bachelor’s degrees and this year, a master’s degree in music from California State University, Los Angeles. In addition to teaching in the afterschool programs and giving private music and violin lessons, Maloof performs in several ensembles, Bedouin X, the Los Angeles Arab Orchestra and Qamar, an Arabic, jazz and rock fusion band.

But he says he’s most passionate about helping students like Shannon and seeing them learn, grow and eventually succeed in life and their careers.

Overcoming doubts

Shannon started getting music lessons from Maloof when she was 12. Through programs she and Maloof participated in, Shannon received several years of guided music lessons free of charge. The two spent even more time, many hours per week, when she was in middle school, hoping to study at LACHSA, the Los Angeles County High School of the Arts.

On the afternoon of the audition, Salma’s uncle dropped her off, along with her mom.

As she walked toward LACHSA’s big orchestra room, she could see three judges in it and could hear other students practicing.

The melodies all around her, which would usually calm her, made her nervous. The other students were amazing.

“Am I going to be as good as them?” she recalled thinking. Thousands of hours of practice came down to this moment.

Walking into the audition room, she picked up her violin, hands trembling.

As she started playing, her confidence grew. The 5-minute audition felt much shorter. The audition seemed to go well. She hoped the judges thought so, too.

About a week after the audition, her mom had already left for work when Salma awoke, around 6 a.m. A sticky note next to her bed immediately caught her eye. Decorated with a smiley face, it read in her mom’s handwriting: “Congratulations! You got in.”

She could almost feel her heart swell with pride and a rush of emotions set in. She did it.

A lifelong bond

Maloof recalled how much joy it brought to him as well. And he remembers a special moment with her at the Watts-Willowbrook Conservatory soon after.

It was his birthday and he was enjoying how 14-year-old Shannon could freely coordinate her body movements with the tune of her music: Her forearm, upper arm, fingers and wrist were in perfect harmony with the melody of her violin.

Teaching her and hearing her play was a true gift, he recalled thinking.

At the end of class that day, as he was wrapping up and preparing to leave the classroom, he heard footsteps approaching his desk. He looked over his shoulder and saw Shannon and her mother.

“I know you will like it. It is your favorite color,” Salma said, handing him an orange tie as her mother thanked him for all he does.

It’s my pleasure, he replied.

The gesture warmed his heart and made it a birthday he’ll always remember.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Music Teacher Gives East and South L.A. Students Opportunities He Missed

As a child, Timothy Maloof loved classical music but his family couldn’t afford lessons for him to learn how to play an instrument. Still, he vowed to someday be a musician.

Not only did he achieve his dream, but he now teaches music to students in underserved communities. One of those students is Salma Shannon, who grew up in South Los Angeles.

This is the story of how they learned from each other and formed a lifelong bond.

Classical music for everyone

Maloof, who has been teaching music on and off for more than a dozen years, works in afterschool programs at the Los Angeles Music and Art School in the Eastside and Watts-Willowbrook Conservatory in South L.A.

“I remember Timothy 15 years ago, jumping on his [motorcycle], violin on his back, heading to a school program to teach violin to low-income kids,” said Xavier Pilsudski, a film actor and editor who worked on a short film that Maloof composed music for. “Timothy believes that classical music shouldn’t be for elite kids only.”

Maloof worked as a dishwasher and a cook in various restaurants to pay his way through school, eventually earning two bachelor’s degrees and this year, a master’s degree in music from California State University, Los Angeles. In addition to teaching in the afterschool programs and giving private music and violin lessons, Maloof performs in several ensembles, Bedouin X, the Los Angeles Arab Orchestra and Qamar, an Arabic, jazz and rock fusion band.

But he says he’s most passionate about helping students like Shannon and seeing them learn, grow and eventually succeed in life and their careers.

Overcoming doubts

Shannon started getting music lessons from Maloof when she was 12. Through programs she and Maloof participated in, Shannon received several years of guided music lessons free of charge. The two spent even more time, many hours per week, when she was in middle school, hoping to study at LACHSA, the Los Angeles County High School of the Arts.

On the afternoon of the audition, Salma’s uncle dropped her off, along with her mom.

As she walked toward LACHSA’s big orchestra room, she could see three judges in it and could hear other students practicing.

The melodies all around her, which would usually calm her, made her nervous. The other students were amazing.

“Am I going to be as good as them?” she recalled thinking. Thousands of hours of practice came down to this moment.

Walking into the audition room, she picked up her violin, hands trembling.

As she started playing, her confidence grew. The 5-minute audition felt much shorter. The audition seemed to go well. She hoped the judges thought so, too.

About a week after the audition, her mom had already left for work when Salma awoke, around 6 a.m. A sticky note next to her bed immediately caught her eye. Decorated with a smiley face, it read in her mom’s handwriting: “Congratulations! You got in.”

She could almost feel her heart swell with pride and a rush of emotions set in. She did it.

A lifelong bond

Maloof recalled how much joy it brought to him as well. And he remembers a special moment with her at the Watts-Willowbrook Conservatory soon after.

It was his birthday and he was enjoying how 14-year-old Shannon could freely coordinate her body movements with the tune of her music: Her forearm, upper arm, fingers and wrist were in perfect harmony with the melody of her violin.

Teaching her and hearing her play was a true gift, he recalled thinking.

At the end of class that day, as he was wrapping up and preparing to leave the classroom, he heard footsteps approaching his desk. He looked over his shoulder and saw Shannon and her mother.

“I know you will like it. It is your favorite color,” Salma said, handing him an orange tie as her mother thanked him for all he does.

It’s my pleasure, he replied.

The gesture warmed his heart and made it a birthday he’ll always remember.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Wrightsil wraps up Spring Hill on the road

Loyola didn’t have to travel to the North Pole to get an early Christmas present. Instead, the Wolf Pack went to Spring Hill Collge to take on the Badgers and left win a 97-79 win over their long-time rivals.

The win is Loyola’s fifth-straight victory against Spring Hill dating back to 2014. The all-time series is now 20-16 with the Badgers still retaining the lead.

Mass communication freshman Zach Wrightsil decked the halls as he nearly racked up a triple-double in the contest. Wrightsil led Loyola in points, rebounds and assists.

He racked up 27 points, scoring 18 points in the first half alone and marking the fourth time he scored 20 points or more this season. Wrightsil also took home a career-high in rebounds with 14 and dished out nine assists.

Wrightsil’s performance marks his fourth double-double on the year and his third consecutive game with the stat line.

Mass communication freshman Myles Burns and business sophomore Terry Smith Jr. both notched 16 points. Smith nearly recorded a double-double with nine rebounds.

Overall, Loyola has a record of 7-4 with a 2-3 road record. The Wolf Pack also sport a 2-2 conference record.

Loyola will kick back up on Jan. 3 at home versus Stillman College at 7:30 p.m.

The post Wrightsil wraps up Spring Hill on the road appeared first on The Maroon.

***

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Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Towson Trills Celebrate the Season on WBAL-TV 11

By: Christian Benford, Contributing Writer
Featured image courtesy of Towson Trills

The Towson Trills performed in last night’s “Season to Celebrate” holiday special by WBAL-TV 11.

The group, who consists of TU students Aaron Bayne, Harmony Reichert, Missy Melkonian, Katie Sacha, Nick Zuelsdorf, William Damanka Jr., and Leroy Hyson, were recently offered the opportunity to be filmed for the special, where they were asked to sing classic Christmas songs.

“They were looking for a couple a capella groups to do the show this year because they haven’t had a lot of those in the past,” Bayne said. “They were looking at, primarily, Baltimore groups…They saw our video on YouTube and just reached out.”

The “Season to Celebrate” special was aired at 8 p.m. on Dec. 19. Hyson voiced his appreciation for the TV airing with much excitement.

“Yeah, it’s really cool,” Hyson said. “Just to be able to be picked out of all the groups that [are] in this area. For them to reach out and for us to be able to film and record; it was a really cool opportunity just to be that kind of example for a cappella groups in this area.”

Hyson and Bayne, seniors now, started the group their freshman year of college in the fall of 2015. The group started out practicing in dorms and stairwells, and have since grown, received a practice room, and have become well-known across campus, Baltimore and internationally, as they were finalists in the 2017 International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella.

The Trills sung classics like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” and Mariah Carey’s famous “All I Want for Christmas is You.” The group hadn’t seen their recorded performance prior to the TV airtime, so even they were in for the surprise.

If you missed last night’s performance, the special will air again on Dec. 22 at 5 p.m. The show is set to rerun on WBAL-TV 11 on Dec. 23 & 24 at 7 p.m., Dec. 25 at 9 p.m., and Dec. 30 at 2 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Third quarter struggles come back to haunt Racers

Story by Gage Johnson

Senior writer

gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

A pair of Salukis and an unordinary third quarter led to a 65-59 loss for the Murray State women’s basketball team on Tuesday.

Coming off of a 26-point home victory against Bethel University, the Racers picked up right where they left off in the first quarter against Southern Illinois University, jumping out to an 18-10 lead thanks to nine early points from junior forward Evelyn Adebayo.

SIU would bounce back in the second quarter outscoring Murray State 17-11, but still trailing 29-27 heading into the locker room.

It took two minutes of play in the second half for someone to put one through the net, but once the Salukis did, they couldn’t miss.

Junior guard Kristen Nelson’s three, one of her four on the night, would trigger a 16-0 run for SIU. Not only were they clicking on offense, but on defense as well. After stopping the run, the Racers would still go on to be outscored 23-7 in the third quarter.

“We can’t go stagnant like that,” said Head Coach Rechelle Turner. “We can’t give good teams opportunities to take advantage of us. You can’t do that at this level, especially if you’re not getting continuous stops.”

Another major factor in the Salukis outpouring on offense were contributions from Nelson and sophomore guard Makenzie Silvey.

Nelson was 8-10 from the field, knocking down 4-4 threes en route to leading all scorers with 24 points. Silvey also added a 23-point performance, as the 2017-2018 MVC All-Freshman team selection shot 8-13, while shooting 3-6 from beyond the arch. The two were the only ones in double figures for SIU, with no other player scoring more than six points.

“Silvey is outstanding,” Turner said. “She’s a crafty, clever player; one of the best in the Missouri Valley Conference . Just like most do, every team has someone that when they need a bucket they can go to, and she was that for them. Then I thought Nelson hit some big shots. She can shoot the basketball.”

The Racers would outscore the Salukis 23-15 in the fourth quarter, but it would be for not as Murray State would fall to SIU 65-59.

The Racers will now hit the road for their toughest stretch of the season, taking on the No. 18 University of Kentucky, and No. 9 University of Tennessee. First will be a trip to take on the Wildcats at 11 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 21, at the Memorial Coliseum.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

University solicits feedback on draft of new personal relationships policy

Vice Provost Sunil Kumar informed the Hopkins community in an email sent on Friday, Dec. 14 that the University is drafting a policy regarding personal relationships, particularly between students and professors. The Draft Personal Relationships Policy defines personal relationships as dating, romantic and sexual relationships. The University is currently soliciting feedback on the draft.

In the past two weeks, students have protested the Office of Institutional Equity’s (OIE) mishandling of sexual violence cases as well as a sexual assault allegation against a current professor, Juan Obarrio. It also came to light that OIE’s website had mistakenly blocked 18 reports of alleged sexual misconduct over the past three years. In his email, Kumar explained that OIE staff members are currently working to address the cases that were not investigated and have expressed their sincere regret to the individuals involved in these reports.

Kumar emphasized that the administration does not condone sexual misconduct and stated that the a new policy will help to create an environment where all members of the community can thrive.

“We have been working to develop a university wide policy regarding sexual and romantic relationships between faculty and students, supervisors and supervisees, or other situations where there may be an academic or professional power differential between individuals,” he wrote.

In an interview with The News-Letter, Kumar and Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs Susan Courtney-Farquee explained that the University began working to create a revised policy on personal relationships long before the incident of alleged sexual misconduct and OIE’s error. Instead, Courtney-Farquee explained that the idea to create a new policy originated in 2017 as a result of the #MeToo movement.

“Last year, with increasing attention focused on sexual harassment and professional power dynamics, there was a sense that we needed to revisit our own policies and make sure that we’re being consistent and proactive,” Courtney-Farquee said.

Kumar encouraged recipients of the email to make suggestions to improve the policy via the University’s Policy website. Additionally, the University will host a series of forums and listening sessions to gather responses from the Hopkins community.

Kumar noted that the University will not enforce the new proposed policies until there is sufficient support and community input.

“This is not yet a policy because it still lays open a variety of options for consideration. Based on the feedback we hope to get, we will then refine an active policy that will go into effect next academic year,” he said.

In an email to The News-Letter, seniors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant, co-directors of the Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU), explained that they are looking forward to reviewing the draft policy.

“We are very excited to see this issue getting the attention it deserves and look forward to reviewing the new policy closely and staying in conversation with JHU administration on the process and impact of the new policy,” they wrote.

Currently, this draft states that personal relationships between students (both graduate and undergraduate) and anyone who can have “influence over their academic progress and/or funding” are prohibited by the University.

“Because student-teacher relationships form the heart of our institutional identity, this Policy pays particular attention to such situations. Romantic and/or sexual relationships are viewed as inimical to the student-teacher relationship,” the document reads. “Our mission depends on having a climate of mutual respect in which academic, professional and scholarly achievements are unambiguously seen as the only criteria for success.”

The draft policy provides four potential options for prohibited graduate student and faculty relationships. These include: prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member has direct influence over a graduate student’s academics; prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member and a graduate student are in the same department; prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member and a graduate student could potentially have an academic relationship; and prohibiting any form of personal relationship between graduate students and faculty or staff members in their same institution.

The last option is clearly labeled as up for debate after taking into consideration community input. In an email to The News-Letter, Isadora Schaller, who leads bystander intervention training, expressed that the proposed prohibition of relationships between graduate students and faculty or staff members at the same institution should be enforced because it will protect students.

“The power dynamic between a student and any faculty or staff with the authority to potentially dictate the success of a student’s academic and professional career cannot be underestimated. Power and control dynamics are antithetical to healthy and successful relationships, and the University should be doing its best to protect all undergraduate and graduate students from situations where they are inherently incapable of giving consent,” she wrote.

Schaller added that although she appreciated University officials for taking the initiative in setting up specific policies for personal relationships, she noted that the current climate in which the draft was released indicates how they have previously neglected to address these issues.

The draft policy also indicates that preexisting relationships that violate these rules are still prohibited. However, the document also notes that exceptions can be made in cases where the relationship is disclosed, the person in a position of power is removed from having authority over the other individual, the impact on the Hopkins community is minimal and a management plan for the relationship is written.

In case of a former relationship between a faculty or staff member and a student, the faculty or staff member will be removed from a position of authority over the student.

The drafted policy further outlines regulations for relationships between two students. Option 1 prohibits relationships between a graduate student and an undergraduate student where the graduate student is in a teaching or supervisory role over the undergraduate student. Option 2 would prohibit relationship where one student is in a supervisory or teaching position over another, regardless of whether they are both graduate or undergraduate students.

This draft also prohibits relationships between two employees where one is a direct supervisor of or has professional influence over the other. Preexisting relationships must be disclosed.

Additionally, family members or members of the same household are not allowed to hold positions of authority over one another.

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) will investigate any violations, including non-consensual relationships, which may result in termination or revocation of tenure. Provost Sunil Kumar explained that this draft of the policy intends to set up guidelines for what is a consensual relationship when placed in the context of power imbalances, i.e. a relationship between a student and their advisor.

“This policy is intended, in part, to prevent relationships that have huge power differentials. Should a non-consensual relationship be identified by either a person in the relationship or someone else, then our normal mechanisms for investigating this, which is through OIE, will kick in,” he said.

He also acknowledged some of the issues students have expressed with OIE, stating that the University has consulted an external firm to conduct a review of the Office.

Sophomore Elana Rubin shared her thoughts on the proposed policy in an email to The News-Letter.

“At first, it seems like a good idea to enforce policies like this to prevent unequal power dynamics. However, I feel like these are limited cases where these rules actually apply. The University seems to be circumventing the actual problem, which is sexual violence and misconduct, which can often occur and does occur without a relationship,” she wrote.

She added that she would like to see University officials take measures to prevent sexual assault and misconduct on campus.

“It’s hard for a university to make policies to try to fix this problem in society, but the most effective way would be making it clear that these behaviors will be met with severe punishments,” she wrote.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

University solicits feedback on draft of new personal relationships policy

Provost Sunil Kumar informed the Hopkins community in an email sent on Friday, Dec. 14 that the University is drafting a policy regarding personal relationships, particularly between students and professors. The Draft Personal Relationships Policy defines personal relationships as dating, romantic and sexual relationships. The University is currently soliciting feedback on the draft.

In the past two weeks, students have protested the Office of Institutional Equity’s (OIE) mishandling of sexual violence cases as well as a sexual assault allegation against a current professor, Juan Obarrio. It also came to light that OIE’s website had mistakenly blocked 18 reports of alleged sexual misconduct over the past three years. In his email, Kumar explained that OIE staff members are currently working to address the cases that were not investigated and have expressed their sincere regret to the individuals involved in these reports.

Kumar emphasized that the administration does not condone sexual misconduct and stated that the a new policy will help to create an environment where all members of the community can thrive.

“We have been working to develop a university wide policy regarding sexual and romantic relationships between faculty and students, supervisors and supervisees, or other situations where there may be an academic or professional power differential between individuals,” he wrote.

In an interview with The News-Letter, Kumar and Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs Susan Courtney-Faruqee explained that the University began working to create a revised policy on personal relationships long before the incident of alleged sexual misconduct and OIE’s error. Instead, Courtney-Faruqee explained that the idea to create a new policy originated in 2017 as a result of the #MeToo movement.

“Last year, with increasing attention focused on sexual harassment and professional power dynamics, there was a sense that we needed to revisit our own policies and make sure that we’re being consistent and proactive,” Courtney-Faruqee said.

Kumar encouraged recipients of the email to make suggestions to improve the policy via the University’s Policy website. Additionally, the University will host a series of forums and listening sessions to gather responses from the Hopkins community.

Kumar noted that the University will not enforce the new proposed policies until there is sufficient support and community input.

“This is not yet a policy because it still lays open a variety of options for consideration. Based on the feedback we hope to get, we will then refine an active policy that will go into effect next academic year,” he said.

In an email to The News-Letter, seniors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant, co-directors of the Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU), explained that they are looking forward to reviewing the draft policy.

“We are very excited to see this issue getting the attention it deserves and look forward to reviewing the new policy closely and staying in conversation with JHU administration on the process and impact of the new policy,” they wrote.

Currently, this draft states that personal relationships between students (both graduate and undergraduate) and anyone who can have “influence over their academic progress and/or funding” are prohibited by the University.

“Because student-teacher relationships form the heart of our institutional identity, this Policy pays particular attention to such situations. Romantic and/or sexual relationships are viewed as inimical to the student-teacher relationship,” the document reads. “Our mission depends on having a climate of mutual respect in which academic, professional and scholarly achievements are unambiguously seen as the only criteria for success.”

The draft policy provides four potential options for prohibited graduate student and faculty relationships. These include: prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member has direct influence over a graduate student’s academics; prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member and a graduate student are in the same department; prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member and a graduate student could potentially have an academic relationship; and prohibiting any form of personal relationship between graduate students and faculty or staff members in their same institution.

These options are clearly labeled as up for debate after taking into consideration community input. In an email to The News-Letter, Isadora Schaller, who leads bystander intervention training, expressed that the proposed prohibition of relationships between graduate students and faculty or staff members at the same institution should be enforced because it will protect students.

“The power dynamic between a student and any faculty or staff with the authority to potentially dictate the success of a student’s academic and professional career cannot be underestimated. Power and control dynamics are antithetical to healthy and successful relationships, and the University should be doing its best to protect all undergraduate and graduate students from situations where they are inherently incapable of giving consent,” she wrote.

Schaller added that although she appreciated University officials for taking the initiative in setting up specific policies for personal relationships, she noted that the current climate in which the draft was released indicates how they have previously neglected to address these issues.

The draft policy also indicates that preexisting relationships that violate these rules are still prohibited. However, the document also notes that exceptions can be made in cases where the relationship is disclosed, the person in a position of power is removed from having authority over the other individual, the impact on the Hopkins community is minimal and a management plan for the relationship is written.

In case of a former relationship between a faculty or staff member and a student, the faculty or staff member will be removed from a position of authority over the student.

The drafted policy further outlines regulations for relationships between two students. Option 1 prohibits relationships between a graduate student and an undergraduate student where the graduate student is in a teaching or supervisory role over the undergraduate student. Option 2 would prohibit relationship where one student is in a supervisory or teaching position over another, regardless of whether they are both graduate or undergraduate students.

This draft also prohibits relationships between two employees where one is a direct supervisor of or has professional influence over the other. Preexisting relationships must be disclosed.

Additionally, family members or members of the same household are not allowed to hold positions of authority over one another.

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) will investigate any violations, including non-consensual relationships, which may result in termination or revocation of tenure. Provost Sunil Kumar explained that this draft of the policy intends to set up guidelines for what is a consensual relationship when placed in the context of power imbalances, i.e. a relationship between a student and their advisor.

“This policy is intended, in part, to prevent relationships that have huge power differentials. Should a non-consensual relationship be identified by either a person in the relationship or someone else, then our normal mechanisms for investigating this, which is through OIE, will kick in,” he said.

He also acknowledged some of the issues students have expressed with OIE, stating that the University has consulted an external firm to conduct a review of the Office.

Sophomore Elana Rubin shared her thoughts on the proposed policy in an email to The News-Letter.

“At first, it seems like a good idea to enforce policies like this to prevent unequal power dynamics. However, I feel like these are limited cases where these rules actually apply. The University seems to be circumventing the actual problem, which is sexual violence and misconduct, which can often occur and does occur without a relationship,” she wrote.

She added that she would like to see University officials take measures to prevent sexual assault and misconduct on campus.

“It’s hard for a university to make policies to try to fix this problem in society, but the most effective way would be making it clear that these behaviors will be met with severe punishments,” she wrote.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

University solicits feedback on draft of new personal relationships policy

Provost Sunil Kumar informed the Hopkins community in an email sent on Friday, Dec. 14 that the University is drafting a policy regarding personal relationships, particularly between students and professors. The Draft Personal Relationships Policy defines personal relationships as dating, romantic and sexual relationships. The University is currently soliciting feedback on the draft.

In the past two weeks, students have protested the Office of Institutional Equity’s (OIE) mishandling of sexual violence cases as well as a sexual assault allegation against a current professor, Juan Obarrio. It also came to light that OIE’s website had mistakenly blocked 18 reports of alleged sexual misconduct over the past three years. In his email, Kumar explained that OIE staff members are currently working to address the cases that were not investigated and have expressed their sincere regret to the individuals involved in these reports.

Kumar emphasized that the administration does not condone sexual misconduct and stated that the a new policy will help to create an environment where all members of the community can thrive.

“We have been working to develop a university wide policy regarding sexual and romantic relationships between faculty and students, supervisors and supervisees, or other situations where there may be an academic or professional power differential between individuals,” he wrote.

In an interview with The News-Letter, Kumar and Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs Susan Courtney-Faruqee explained that the University began working to create a revised policy on personal relationships long before the incident of alleged sexual misconduct and OIE’s error. Instead, Courtney-Faruqee explained that the idea to create a new policy originated in 2017 as a result of the #MeToo movement.

“Last year, with increasing attention focused on sexual harassment and professional power dynamics, there was a sense that we needed to revisit our own policies and make sure that we’re being consistent and proactive,” Courtney-Faruqee said.

Kumar encouraged recipients of the email to make suggestions to improve the policy via the University’s Policy website. Additionally, the University will host a series of forums and listening sessions to gather responses from the Hopkins community.

Kumar noted that the University will not enforce the new proposed policies until there is sufficient support and community input.

“This is not yet a policy because it still lays open a variety of options for consideration. Based on the feedback we hope to get, we will then refine an active policy that will go into effect next academic year,” he said.

In an email to The News-Letter, seniors Mayuri Viswanathan and Bella Radant, co-directors of the Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU), explained that they are looking forward to reviewing the draft policy.

“We are very excited to see this issue getting the attention it deserves and look forward to reviewing the new policy closely and staying in conversation with JHU administration on the process and impact of the new policy,” they wrote.

Currently, this draft states that personal relationships between students (both graduate and undergraduate) and anyone who can have “influence over their academic progress and/or funding” are prohibited by the University.

“Because student-teacher relationships form the heart of our institutional identity, this Policy pays particular attention to such situations. Romantic and/or sexual relationships are viewed as inimical to the student-teacher relationship,” the document reads. “Our mission depends on having a climate of mutual respect in which academic, professional and scholarly achievements are unambiguously seen as the only criteria for success.”

The draft policy provides four potential options for prohibited graduate student and faculty relationships. These include: prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member has direct influence over a graduate student’s academics; prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member and a graduate student are in the same department; prohibiting relationships where a faculty or staff member and a graduate student could potentially have an academic relationship; and prohibiting any form of personal relationship between graduate students and faculty or staff members in their same institution.

These options are clearly labeled as up for debate after taking into consideration community input. In an email to The News-Letter, Isadora Schaller, who leads bystander intervention training, expressed that the proposed prohibition of relationships between graduate students and faculty or staff members at the same institution should be enforced because it will protect students.

“The power dynamic between a student and any faculty or staff with the authority to potentially dictate the success of a student’s academic and professional career cannot be underestimated. Power and control dynamics are antithetical to healthy and successful relationships, and the University should be doing its best to protect all undergraduate and graduate students from situations where they are inherently incapable of giving consent,” she wrote.

Schaller added that although she appreciated University officials for taking the initiative in setting up specific policies for personal relationships, she noted that the current climate in which the draft was released indicates how they have previously neglected to address these issues.

The draft policy also indicates that preexisting relationships that violate these rules are still prohibited. However, the document also notes that exceptions can be made in cases where the relationship is disclosed, the person in a position of power is removed from having authority over the other individual, the impact on the Hopkins community is minimal and a management plan for the relationship is written.

In case of a former relationship between a faculty or staff member and a student, the faculty or staff member will be removed from a position of authority over the student.

The drafted policy further outlines regulations for relationships between two students. Option 1 prohibits relationships between a graduate student and an undergraduate student where the graduate student is in a teaching or supervisory role over the undergraduate student. Option 2 would prohibit relationship where one student is in a supervisory or teaching position over another, regardless of whether they are both graduate or undergraduate students.

This draft also prohibits relationships between two employees where one is a direct supervisor of or has professional influence over the other. Preexisting relationships must be disclosed.

Additionally, family members or members of the same household are not allowed to hold positions of authority over one another.

The Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) will investigate any violations, including non-consensual relationships, which may result in termination or revocation of tenure. Provost Sunil Kumar explained that this draft of the policy intends to set up guidelines for what is a consensual relationship when placed in the context of power imbalances, i.e. a relationship between a student and their advisor.

“This policy is intended, in part, to prevent relationships that have huge power differentials. Should a non-consensual relationship be identified by either a person in the relationship or someone else, then our normal mechanisms for investigating this, which is through OIE, will kick in,” he said.

He also acknowledged some of the issues students have expressed with OIE, stating that the University has consulted an external firm to conduct a review of the Office.

Sophomore Elana Rubin shared her thoughts on the proposed policy in an email to The News-Letter.

“At first, it seems like a good idea to enforce policies like this to prevent unequal power dynamics. However, I feel like these are limited cases where these rules actually apply. The University seems to be circumventing the actual problem, which is sexual violence and misconduct, which can often occur and does occur without a relationship,” she wrote.

She added that she would like to see University officials take measures to prevent sexual assault and misconduct on campus.

“It’s hard for a university to make policies to try to fix this problem in society, but the most effective way would be making it clear that these behaviors will be met with severe punishments,” she wrote.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Movie review: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

A new Spider-Man movie has been released and it’s not the usual live-action Spider-Man film one would expect. 

The focus of the movie is not on Peter Parker but on a new, different Spider-Man in a somewhat similar universe named Miles Morales. 

Morales is an Afro-Latino teenager in the bustling city of New York. Morales is a relatively new character when compared to the character of Spider-Man, Parker. 

The character Morales was created in 2009 by Marvel Comics writer and artist, Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli. Morales soon gained popularity in the comic book community for being a new person to dawn the webbed mask. 

Last year, there was an announcement that an animated Spider-Man film was in the works. Fans were excited to hear that it would be focusing on a new character and how he became Spider-Man. 

However, Morales is not the only Spider-Man or rather Spider-person in this film. Different universes consisting of different Spider-people make their debut. 

There is an older Peter Parker who reluctantly dawns the mantle of Spider-Man for reasons to be revealed. He assumes the role of a mentor to Morales throughout the film. 

There is also a teenaged girl named Gwen who is Spider-Woman, a 1930’s noir detective named Spider-Man Noir, Peni Parker a young girl from the future who commands Spider-Man robot and lastly, a wacky cartoon pig version of the Web Slinger hilariously named, Spider-Ham. 

The movie is vibrant and so deliciously animated, the film has elements by its transitions that makes it feel the viewer is experiencing a comic book. 

The entire cast gives stellar performances throughout the movie, with celebrities such as Shameik Moore, Mahershala Ali, Brian Tyree Henry, and Nicholas Cage. The soundtrack for the movie sets the mood of each scene appropriately, giving the feel and perspective for young Miles. Artists such as Post Malone and Vincent Staples contributed their talents to the soundtrack. 

Fans of Spider-Man, young and old, will take delight in all the Spider-Man references displayed in the movie. Even though this isn’t a Marvel Studios film, there is an end credits scene which leaves a small opening for the sequel. 

Overall, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was not only a phenomenal film but a spectacular Spider-Man movie. The film has the grandeur, comedy, and heart that perfectly depicts a sensational Spider-Man story. 

The film presents itself displaying everything about the original Spider-Man mythos while having new elements to bring satisfaction and amazement within older and new generations alike.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Movie review: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

A new Spider-Man movie has been released and it’s not the usual live-action Spider-Man film one would expect. 

The focus of the movie is not on Peter Parker but on a new, different Spider-Man in a somewhat similar universe named Miles Morales. 

Morales is an Afro-Latino teenager in the bustling city of New York. Morales is a relatively new character when compared to the character of Spider-Man, Parker. 

The character Morales was created in 2009 by Marvel Comics writer and artist, Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli. Morales soon gained popularity in the comic book community for being a new person to dawn the webbed mask. 

Last year, there was an announcement that an animated Spider-Man film was in the works. Fans were excited to hear that it would be focusing on a new character and how he became Spider-Man. 

However, Morales is not the only Spider-Man or rather Spider-person in this film. Different universes consisting of different Spider-people make their debut. 

There is an older Peter Parker who reluctantly dawns the mantle of Spider-Man for reasons to be revealed. He assumes the role of a mentor to Morales throughout the film. 

There is also a teenaged girl named Gwen who is Spider-Woman, a 1930’s noir detective named Spider-Man Noir, Peni Parker a young girl from the future who commands Spider-Man robot and lastly, a wacky cartoon pig version of the Web Slinger hilariously named, Spider-Ham. 

The movie is vibrant and so deliciously animated, the film has elements by its transitions that makes it feel the viewer is experiencing a comic book. 

The entire cast gives stellar performances throughout the movie, with celebrities such as Shameik Moore, Mahershala Ali, Brian Tyree Henry, and Nicholas Cage. The soundtrack for the movie sets the mood of each scene appropriately, giving the feel and perspective for young Miles. Artists such as Post Malone and Vincent Staples contributed their talents to the soundtrack. 

Fans of Spider-Man, young and old, will take delight in all the Spider-Man references displayed in the movie. Even though this isn’t a Marvel Studios film, there is an end credits scene which leaves a small opening for the sequel. 

Overall, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was not only a phenomenal film but a spectacular Spider-Man movie. The film has the grandeur, comedy, and heart that perfectly depicts a sensational Spider-Man story. 

The film presents itself displaying everything about the original Spider-Man mythos while having new elements to bring satisfaction and amazement within older and new generations alike.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Movie review: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

A new Spider-Man movie has been released and it’s not the usual live-action Spider-Man film one would expect. 

The focus of the movie is not on Peter Parker but on a new, different Spider-Man in a somewhat similar universe named Miles Morales. 

Morales is an Afro-Latino teenager in the bustling city of New York. Morales is a relatively new character when compared to the character of Spider-Man, Parker. 

The character Morales was created in 2009 by Marvel Comics writer and artist, Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli. Morales soon gained popularity in the comic book community for being a new person to dawn the webbed mask. 

Last year, there was an announcement that an animated Spider-Man film was in the works. Fans were excited to hear that it would be focusing on a new character and how he became Spider-Man. 

However, Morales is not the only Spider-Man or rather Spider-person in this film. Different universes consisting of different Spider-people make their debut. 

There is an older Peter Parker who reluctantly dawns the mantle of Spider-Man for reasons to be revealed. He assumes the role of a mentor to Morales throughout the film. 

There is also a teenaged girl named Gwen who is Spider-Woman, a 1930’s noir detective named Spider-Man Noir, Peni Parker a young girl from the future who commands Spider-Man robot and lastly, a wacky cartoon pig version of the Web Slinger hilariously named, Spider-Ham. 

The movie is vibrant and so deliciously animated, the film has elements by its transitions that makes it feel the viewer is experiencing a comic book. 

The entire cast gives stellar performances throughout the movie, with celebrities such as Shameik Moore, Mahershala Ali, Brian Tyree Henry, and Nicholas Cage. The soundtrack for the movie sets the mood of each scene appropriately, giving the feel and perspective for young Miles. Artists such as Post Malone and Vincent Staples contributed their talents to the soundtrack. 

Fans of Spider-Man, young and old, will take delight in all the Spider-Man references displayed in the movie. Even though this isn’t a Marvel Studios film, there is an end credits scene which leaves a small opening for the sequel. 

Overall, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was not only a phenomenal film but a spectacular Spider-Man movie. The film has the grandeur, comedy, and heart that perfectly depicts a sensational Spider-Man story. 

The film presents itself displaying everything about the original Spider-Man mythos while having new elements to bring satisfaction and amazement within older and new generations alike.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Movie review: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

A new Spider-Man movie has been released and it’s not the usual live-action Spider-Man film one would expect. 

The focus of the movie is not on Peter Parker but on a new, different Spider-Man in a somewhat similar universe named Miles Morales. 

Morales is an Afro-Latino teenager in the bustling city of New York. Morales is a relatively new character when compared to the character of Spider-Man, Parker. 

The character Morales was created in 2009 by Marvel Comics writer and artist, Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli. Morales soon gained popularity in the comic book community for being a new person to dawn the webbed mask. 

Last year, there was an announcement that an animated Spider-Man film was in the works. Fans were excited to hear that it would be focusing on a new character and how he became Spider-Man. 

However, Morales is not the only Spider-Man or rather Spider-person in this film. Different universes consisting of different Spider-people make their debut. 

There is an older Peter Parker who reluctantly dawns the mantle of Spider-Man for reasons to be revealed. He assumes the role of a mentor to Morales throughout the film. 

There is also a teenaged girl named Gwen who is Spider-Woman, a 1930’s noir detective named Spider-Man Noir, Peni Parker a young girl from the future who commands Spider-Man robot and lastly, a wacky cartoon pig version of the Web Slinger hilariously named, Spider-Ham. 

The movie is vibrant and so deliciously animated, the film has elements by its transitions that makes it feel the viewer is experiencing a comic book. 

The entire cast gives stellar performances throughout the movie, with celebrities such as Shameik Moore, Mahershala Ali, Brian Tyree Henry, and Nicholas Cage. The soundtrack for the movie sets the mood of each scene appropriately, giving the feel and perspective for young Miles. Artists such as Post Malone and Vincent Staples contributed their talents to the soundtrack. 

Fans of Spider-Man, young and old, will take delight in all the Spider-Man references displayed in the movie. Even though this isn’t a Marvel Studios film, there is an end credits scene which leaves a small opening for the sequel. 

Overall, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was not only a phenomenal film but a spectacular Spider-Man movie. The film has the grandeur, comedy, and heart that perfectly depicts a sensational Spider-Man story. 

The film presents itself displaying everything about the original Spider-Man mythos while having new elements to bring satisfaction and amazement within older and new generations alike.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Movie review: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

A new Spider-Man movie has been released and it’s not the usual live-action Spider-Man film one would expect. 

The focus of the movie is not on Peter Parker but on a new, different Spider-Man in a somewhat similar universe named Miles Morales. 

Morales is an Afro-Latino teenager in the bustling city of New York. Morales is a relatively new character when compared to the character of Spider-Man, Parker. 

The character Morales was created in 2009 by Marvel Comics writer and artist, Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli. Morales soon gained popularity in the comic book community for being a new person to dawn the webbed mask. 

Last year, there was an announcement that an animated Spider-Man film was in the works. Fans were excited to hear that it would be focusing on a new character and how he became Spider-Man. 

However, Morales is not the only Spider-Man or rather Spider-person in this film. Different universes consisting of different Spider-people make their debut. 

There is an older Peter Parker who reluctantly dawns the mantle of Spider-Man for reasons to be revealed. He assumes the role of a mentor to Morales throughout the film. 

There is also a teenaged girl named Gwen who is Spider-Woman, a 1930’s noir detective named Spider-Man Noir, Peni Parker a young girl from the future who commands Spider-Man robot and lastly, a wacky cartoon pig version of the Web Slinger hilariously named, Spider-Ham. 

The movie is vibrant and so deliciously animated, the film has elements by its transitions that makes it feel the viewer is experiencing a comic book. 

The entire cast gives stellar performances throughout the movie, with celebrities such as Shameik Moore, Mahershala Ali, Brian Tyree Henry, and Nicholas Cage. The soundtrack for the movie sets the mood of each scene appropriately, giving the feel and perspective for young Miles. Artists such as Post Malone and Vincent Staples contributed their talents to the soundtrack. 

Fans of Spider-Man, young and old, will take delight in all the Spider-Man references displayed in the movie. Even though this isn’t a Marvel Studios film, there is an end credits scene which leaves a small opening for the sequel. 

Overall, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was not only a phenomenal film but a spectacular Spider-Man movie. The film has the grandeur, comedy, and heart that perfectly depicts a sensational Spider-Man story. 

The film presents itself displaying everything about the original Spider-Man mythos while having new elements to bring satisfaction and amazement within older and new generations alike.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

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Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

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Men’s basketball loses heartbreaker to Pacific

The men’s basketball team lost heartbreakingly to Pacific on Sunday, blowing a three-point lead with 40 seconds left in the game to lose 79-77.

In a game that saw five lead changes, as well as five times where the score was tied, it’s only fitting that it would come down to the final seconds to determine a victor.

The Matadors held the lead with less than a minute to go, but a rare mistake from sophomore Terrell Gomez saw the Tigers tie the game on free throws after Gomez fouled senior Roberto Gallinat on a deep three-point attempt.

With the game tied and only 32 seconds remaining, the Matadors attempted to drain the clock and take the last shot, but their efforts were wasted after freshman Darius Brown coughed up the ball and the Tigers hit the game-winning layup with only two seconds left.

“I think the number one thing is you got to be able to finish a game,” coach Mark Gottfried said. “We didn’t finish it and (we were) in a position to finish it, and we got to do a better job. But we got to keep our head up, and you got to bounce back. You got a lot of games left to play, and unfortunately, we just don’t have a lot to show for it tonight. But I thought our guys played hard. They played well at times. We just got to finish the game a little better.”

As has been the case all season, free throws really hurt CSUN, especially in the second half. The Matadors went 8-13 from the charity stripe in the second half after a respectable 11-15 showing in the first half, compared to the Tigers who shot 16-19 in the second half and 25-28 overall.

Pacific forward Anthony Townes led all scorers with 24 points, while forward Lamine Diane led the Matadors with 23 points, grabbing eight rebounds and blocking four shots as well.

Brown, despite the turnover at the end, would have a nice game as well, recording 11 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals.

They would be the only starters to play up their season averages in what was a game to forget for many Matadors.

Gomez, who averaged 18.1 points and 3 three-pointers per game entering the contest, scored 11 points, but shot 1-7 from a distance and had only one assist.

“(Gomez can) find other ways to benefit the team,” Brown said. “You know, if you can’t hit shots, you got to step up, do something else. Assists, defense, steals. Everybody has an off shooting game, so nobody holds it against him. It is what it is.”

Graduate transfer Cameron Gottfried scored only three points while senior Blair Orr went scoreless and played just 12 minutes in what was his worst game since entering the starting lineup four games ago.

With the starters unable to perform to their usual standards, it was up to the bench to carry the load, scoring a season-high 29 points.

Junior Rodney “Rocket” Henderson was electric, scoring 17 points in only 19 minutes and hitting all five of his three-point attempts, while freshman Elijah Harkless contributed seven points, two rebounds and two assists in 11 minutes of action.

“I thought (Henderson) gave us a great lift and made some big shots at some critical times, crucial times,” said coach Gottfried. “He did a really nice job.”

After the loss, the Matadors now have a record of 3-7. They will travel to New Mexico State for a 6 p.m. game on Wednesday, Dec. 19 for the next round of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic before heading to Las Vegas for the final rounds next weekend. They will play SIUE on Saturday, Dec. 22 at 11 a.m. before playing either Northern Colorado or Rider on Sunday, Dec. 23.

The Matadors’ next home game is on Saturday, Dec. 29 against Morgan State at 7 p.m.

***

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No. 11 Texas Tech dominates in Wildcats’ second loss

It was throwback night in Lubbock Saturday evening as No. 11 Texas Tech hosted the Wildcats and defeated them 82-48 in what was the last game to be played in Lubbock Municipal Coliseum.

Each team wore throwback uniforms in front of a soldout crowd of 7,169 people.

The Wildcats held a lead nearly four minutes into the game, but the Red Raiders jumped ahead 8-6 at the 16:20 mark and never looked back.

Texas Tech took a double-digit lead halfway through the half at 22-11 and cruised its way to a 41-26 lead at halftime.

ACU could only muster up 22 points in the second half, while the Red Raiders matched its first half with another 41 points to pick up the lopsided victory.

Head coach Joe Golding said Texas Tech is well-coached and a tough team to face.

“We have the ultimate respect for Texas Tech,” Golding said. “There’s no dropoff from their team last year and it was like playing the same team defensively.”

Compared to their last few games, the men saw a drop in their shooting percentage Saturday evening as they shot 28.3 percent from the field and 23.8 percent beyond the arc.

Redshirt junior center Jalone Friday led the team in scoring with 12 points and added seven rebounds, a block and a steal.

Texas Tech shot 55.6 percent from the field converting on 30 of 54 shots in the game.

Sophomore guard Jarrett Culver, a Lubbock native, helped the Red Raiders’ shooting cause making 12 of his 13 shots. He came away with 30 points, seven rebounds and four assists.

Golding said Culver had a huge impact in the game and was tough to stop.

“He looked like an NBA player,” Golding said. “Fortunately for us, we don’t have to face Culver in our league. He’s a special player, he’s the best player we’ve played against to this point in the year.”

With the loss, the Wildcats slip to 9-2 on the season, while Texas Tech stays undefeated at 10-0.

The men will now get most of the week off and hit the road again Friday to face Southeast Missouri State in Cape Girardeau. Tipoff will be at 6:30 p.m. and coverage will air on ESPN+.

The post No. 11 Texas Tech dominates in Wildcats’ second loss appeared first on Optimist.

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Podcast: It’s all about football

The Wildcat Rumble is back for its final episode of the semester. In this episode Andrew and Ricardo are joined by Alex Grant. Football is the topic of discussion as the NFL season presses on. Listen for your favorite segments, like game of the week, freaks and geeks and the moment of the week. Agree or disagree with anything? Comment below and tell us what you think.

The Wildcat Rumble will be back spring semester with new guests, different segments and more content. Be sure to check out the other podcasts from The Orion and give them a listen. “And if we don’t see ya, see ya.”

Andrew Baumgartner can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com or @abaum94 on Twitter.

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University to conduct controlled deer hunt in Nature Preserve

As campus empties for winter break, Binghamton University’s Nature Preserve will be closed for a controlled bowhunt in an effort to fight the overpopulation of deer in the area.

The hunt, which will be conducted from Dec. 16 to 18, is the result of recommendations from the Committee on the University Environment (CUE), which has been working toward a solution for the deer overpopulation problem at BU for roughly seven years.

The overpopulation problem, which has developed over the past 40 years, is a result of a large amount of protected land without any natural predators. There are no wolves or pumas in the Nature Preserve and only a small number of other predators, such as coyotes, which has allowed the deer population to grow on campus. It is estimated that the Nature Preserve is home to at least 175 deer this year, roughly 10 times the number that should be there for a healthy forest ecosystem.

The overpopulation is causing environmental issues within the Nature Preserve. In recent years, the area has lost numerous species of wildflowers and currently lacks a layer of vegetation beneath the main canopy of the forest, disrupting regeneration and causing a decline in various species of ground nesting birds and small mammals, which rely on these plants to survive. The deer have also begun venturing into main areas of campus to find food, habituating them to humans and causing an increased number of car crashes as they cross University roads.

To decrease the deer population, the University plans to conduct a series of controlled hunts over the next several years. According to Dylan Horvath, steward of BU’s natural areas, all of the hunts will follow guidelines and regulations set by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the town of Vestal, and the hunts will be held during the winter break, when classes aren’t in session.

“We are facilitating a culture that already occurs on adjacent properties and across the state and country,” Horvath said. “Since this isn’t a cull, this first try isn’t likely to have a significant effect, but if successful, then future years should see more of a reduction.”

During this year’s hunt, 20 to 50 deer will be killed by bowhunters, who were selected by Binghamton’s New York State University Police (UPD), according to a “Frequently Asked Questions” on the hunt released by the University. UPD will be closing off entrances to the Nature Preserve and ensuring students, faculty and community members stay out of the area while the hunt is being conducted.

“A select number of seasoned, experienced bowhunters were selected,” the page read. “If this pilot program goes well, the hunter application process will be opened to a larger number of community members next time.”

The University previously tried to address the overpopulation problem, proposing a cull in 2011, a process where professionals would bait, capture and kill deer. However, the move was met with a lawsuit from Charles Carpenter, a former BU English professor and Vestal resident who lives near the Nature Preserve, and In Defense of Animals (IDA), a national nonprofit organization. The plaintiffs argued the culling would pose “a significant safety risk to the citizens of the area” and that “the University should have conducted a ‘safety study’ prior to deciding,” according to court documents. Ultimately, the State Supreme Court ruled against the University, eliminating the plans for a cull.

This time, the University isn’t planning a cull, and will kill a smaller number of deer in the Nature Preserve. It also created a deer management plan containing research on the deer population in the Nature Preserve and options to handle the issue, which included fencing, translocation and sterilization. Horvath said he worked with CUE to explore these options, but ultimately decided the hunt was the more feasible within the limits of the Nature Preserve, and most ethical for the deer.

“Making these decisions isn’t easy as I love deer, too,” Horvath said. “However, I love other animals and the plants as well. It’s actually more stressful and heartbreaking to watch the forest diminish.”

According to Horvath, the alternate options were difficult to implement because of the size of the Nature Preserve, which spans roughly 182 acres. Additionally, Horvath said he feared options like translocation or sterilization could result in the deer being harmed during the process, and would cause the animals undue stress. Robert Holahan, an associate professor of environmental studies and political science, said the hunt is ultimately necessary to control the large deer population.

“The hunt is absolutely necessary,” Holahan said. “There really aren’t good alternatives considering the sheer size of the herd, so that’s why the University is going with the hunt.”

Although the 2011 plan to cull the deer population was met with resistance from students, this year’s hunt has seen less backlash. Ezra Beede, a sophomore double-majoring in history and philosophy, politics and law, said without significant predators, a controlled bowhunt is appropriate and will help protect the Nature Preserve.

“The deers’ natural predators are gone,” Beede said. “So, even though [a hunt] can sound bad, it’s actually a good thing.”

***

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University to conduct controlled deer hunt in Nature Preserve

As campus empties for winter break, Binghamton University’s Nature Preserve will be closed for a controlled bowhunt in an effort to fight the overpopulation of deer in the area.

The hunt, which will be conducted from Dec. 16 to 18, is the result of recommendations from the Committee on the University Environment (CUE), which has been working toward a solution for the deer overpopulation problem at BU for roughly seven years.

The overpopulation problem, which has developed over the past 40 years, is a result of a large amount of protected land without any natural predators. There are no wolves or pumas in the Nature Preserve and only a small number of other predators, such as coyotes, which has allowed the deer population to grow on campus. It is estimated that the Nature Preserve is home to at least 175 deer this year, roughly 10 times the number that should be there for a healthy forest ecosystem.

The overpopulation is causing environmental issues within the Nature Preserve. In recent years, the area has lost numerous species of wildflowers and currently lacks a layer of vegetation beneath the main canopy of the forest, disrupting regeneration and causing a decline in various species of ground nesting birds and small mammals, which rely on these plants to survive. The deer have also begun venturing into main areas of campus to find food, habituating them to humans and causing an increased number of car crashes as they cross University roads.

To decrease the deer population, the University plans to conduct a series of controlled hunts over the next several years. According to Dylan Horvath, steward of BU’s natural areas, all of the hunts will follow guidelines and regulations set by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the town of Vestal, and the hunts will be held during the winter break, when classes aren’t in session.

“We are facilitating a culture that already occurs on adjacent properties and across the state and country,” Horvath said. “Since this isn’t a cull, this first try isn’t likely to have a significant effect, but if successful, then future years should see more of a reduction.”

During this year’s hunt, 20 to 50 deer will be killed by bowhunters, who were selected by Binghamton’s New York State University Police (UPD), according to a “Frequently Asked Questions” on the hunt released by the University. UPD will be closing off entrances to the Nature Preserve and ensuring students, faculty and community members stay out of the area while the hunt is being conducted.

“A select number of seasoned, experienced bowhunters were selected,” the page read. “If this pilot program goes well, the hunter application process will be opened to a larger number of community members next time.”

The University previously tried to address the overpopulation problem, proposing a cull in 2011, a process where professionals would bait, capture and kill deer. However, the move was met with a lawsuit from Charles Carpenter, a former BU English professor and Vestal resident who lives near the Nature Preserve, and In Defense of Animals (IDA), a national nonprofit organization. The plaintiffs argued the culling would pose “a significant safety risk to the citizens of the area” and that “the University should have conducted a ‘safety study’ prior to deciding,” according to court documents. Ultimately, the State Supreme Court ruled against the University, eliminating the plans for a cull.

This time, the University isn’t planning a cull, and will kill a smaller number of deer in the Nature Preserve. It also created a deer management plan containing research on the deer population in the Nature Preserve and options to handle the issue, which included fencing, translocation and sterilization. Horvath said he worked with CUE to explore these options, but ultimately decided the hunt was the more feasible within the limits of the Nature Preserve, and most ethical for the deer.

“Making these decisions isn’t easy as I love deer, too,” Horvath said. “However, I love other animals and the plants as well. It’s actually more stressful and heartbreaking to watch the forest diminish.”

According to Horvath, the alternate options were difficult to implement because of the size of the Nature Preserve, which spans roughly 182 acres. Additionally, Horvath said he feared options like translocation or sterilization could result in the deer being harmed during the process, and would cause the animals undue stress. Robert Holahan, an associate professor of environmental studies and political science, said the hunt is ultimately necessary to control the large deer population.

“The hunt is absolutely necessary,” Holahan said. “There really aren’t good alternatives considering the sheer size of the herd, so that’s why the University is going with the hunt.”

Although the 2011 plan to cull the deer population was met with resistance from students, this year’s hunt has seen less backlash. Ezra Beede, a sophomore double-majoring in history and philosophy, politics and law, said without significant predators, a controlled bowhunt is appropriate and will help protect the Nature Preserve.

“The deers’ natural predators are gone,” Beede said. “So, even though [a hunt] can sound bad, it’s actually a good thing.”

***

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Incident in Glickman Library reported to Portland Police

Valerie Kazarian, Staff Writer

Officers from both USM Public Safely and the Portland Police Department were called to Glickman Library at about 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 12 in response to a disorderly conduct complaint. The incident involved students, staff and alumni, according to David Roussel, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs.   

“USM Public Safety has been called by Glickman Family Library staff four times in the past six weeks,” said Noel March, USM Chief of Police, “to help them address repeated reports of loud and unruly behavior during evening hours.” On Wednesday, “the conflict became loud and Portland police was called to assist the USM officer in escorting a few people from the library.”

The Office of Student Affairs sent all students a campus incident email providing initial information about the event. According to the email, “the incident was reported to USM officials and a full and timely investigation is being conducted related to this incident.”

Those affected by the disturbance will be contacted by USM administrators and campus officials, said Roussel. President Cummings, Chief March, and the human resources and student and academic affairs offices have begun the process of reviewing and evaluating relevant procedures to develop a report and action plan once the investigation is complete. “Student Affairs is reviewing the matter with the library and Public Safety staff to seek solutions to this type of unrest in the future,” March said.

This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available.         

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Incident in Glickman Library reported to Portland Police

Valerie Kazarian, Staff Writer

Officers from both USM Public Safely and the Portland Police Department were called to Glickman Library at about 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 12 in response to a disorderly conduct complaint. The incident involved students, staff and alumni, according to David Roussel, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs.   

“USM Public Safety has been called by Glickman Family Library staff four times in the past six weeks,” said Noel March, USM Chief of Police, “to help them address repeated reports of loud and unruly behavior during evening hours.” On Wednesday, “the conflict became loud and Portland police was called to assist the USM officer in escorting a few people from the library.”

The Office of Student Affairs sent all students a campus incident email providing initial information about the event. According to the email, “the incident was reported to USM officials and a full and timely investigation is being conducted related to this incident.”

Those affected by the disturbance will be contacted by USM administrators and campus officials, said Roussel. President Cummings, Chief March, and the human resources and student and academic affairs offices have begun the process of reviewing and evaluating relevant procedures to develop a report and action plan once the investigation is complete. “Student Affairs is reviewing the matter with the library and Public Safety staff to seek solutions to this type of unrest in the future,” March said.

This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available.         

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Incident in Glickman Library reported to Portland Police

Valerie Kazarian, Staff Writer

Officers from both USM Public Safely and the Portland Police Department were called to Glickman Library at about 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 12 in response to a disorderly conduct complaint. The incident involved students, staff and alumni, according to David Roussel, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs.   

“USM Public Safety has been called by Glickman Family Library staff four times in the past six weeks,” said Noel March, USM Chief of Police, “to help them address repeated reports of loud and unruly behavior during evening hours.” On Wednesday, “the conflict became loud and Portland police was called to assist the USM officer in escorting a few people from the library.”

The Office of Student Affairs sent all students a campus incident email providing initial information about the event. According to the email, “the incident was reported to USM officials and a full and timely investigation is being conducted related to this incident.”

Those affected by the disturbance will be contacted by USM administrators and campus officials, said Roussel. President Cummings, Chief March, and the human resources and student and academic affairs offices have begun the process of reviewing and evaluating relevant procedures to develop a report and action plan once the investigation is complete. “Student Affairs is reviewing the matter with the library and Public Safety staff to seek solutions to this type of unrest in the future,” March said.

This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available.         

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Letter to the Editor 12/14/2018

In response to Hopkins Hospital continues to undervalue the lives of its patients published on Dec. 26:

Dear Editors,

The Johns Hopkins News-Letter recently published a story and editorial that overlooked a number of important facts regarding nursing and patient care at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Safe, high-quality patient care is our first priority. The Johns Hopkins Hospital, a nonprofit hospital providing care for a large number of underserved residents, consistently earns recognition as one of the nation’s best hospitals for patient safety and care.

As your readers may be aware, National Nurses United has been trying to unionize nurses at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The story reports the results of a union survey based on responses from just 5 percent of the 3,200 nurses who work at the hospital. The survey does not accurately represent the voice of nurses, nor does your story mention the many nurses who oppose unionization.

Please allow me to set the record straight on several other issues.

While the union has filed complaints with the National Labor Relations Board, we believe the charges lack merit. Contrary to what the story reports, the NLRB process is ongoing and final determinations have not yet been made.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital is well-staffed to provide high-quality care. Our nurse turnover rates are well below the national average, and nurse vacancy rates are consistent with the national average. We offer nurses important scheduling flexibility and the option to work three 12-hour shifts each week – a schedule that many nurses want and prefer.

Our model is recognized across the country and around the world for a culture of clinical collaboration, open communication and shared governance. This approach helped The Johns Hopkins Hospital earn Magnet recognition for nursing excellence – the highest national distinction for professional nursing practice, awarded to only 8 percent of hospitals in the U.S. We were the first hospital in Maryland to earn the designation, in 2003, and among less than 1 percent of hospitals in the U.S. to receive Magnet designation four consecutive times.

Our nurses and hospital are among the best in the world. Together we make extraordinary contributions to the communities we serve. I am incredibly proud of what we have achieved and am grateful for the skills and commitment of all our nurses.

Signed,
Deborah Baker
Senior Vice President for Nursing, Johns Hopkins Health System
Vice President of Nursing and Patient Care Services, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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Alumnus offers opportunities for artists

Recent CSUN grad and author Jesse Orenshein is helping current students bridge the gap from students to professionals by recruiting them to work as illustrators on his series of children’s’ books. Louise Calvento, an animation major who graduated this fall, was the first to take him up on his offer.

“This was my very first children’s book experience,” Calvento said. “And I’m using the knowledge I learned from making this book with (Orenshein) at my current job. If anything, he was the reason why I got this gig I have now.”

Since graduating in May of 2018, Orenshein has published two books with CSUN artists and is in production on seven more with five other Matador artists. He describes the working relationship as a partnership and is offering interested artists an opportunity to develop new skills and challenge themselves creatively.

“I give the artists a lot of creative freedom,” Orenshein said. “Sometimes I have specific ideas for how I want something to look, but mostly it’s a collaborative process. And they’ve come up with some amazing stuff that I wouldn’t have even thought of.”

His second book, “The Strongest Man”, was just published last Friday. Its release coincides with the launch of his website and self-publishing brand: Grandpa Herbie’s Stories. All stories published under this umbrella will follow three rules that Orenshein feels are important elements of his style of storytelling: they rhyme, are adventurous and teach a moral lesson. The site features Orenshein’s current work and a peak at his upcoming projects.

“It’s named after my Grandfather who taught me to love story telling,” Orenshein said.

Orenshein, who transferred from Santa Monica College, started putting flyers up around campus during his first semester at CSUN. He quickly received dozens of responses from interested artists. Calvento was the first to send him a portfolio.

“I was blown away by her work,” Orenshein said. “She’s such a talented artist and it was a great experience working with her. I’ve been impressed by all of the CSUN artists I’ve worked with, with the professional quality of the work they’ve shown me.”

Calvento and Orenshein worked together on “The Boy Who Owned a Candy Store” which was published in June 2018. For Calvento, the experience was transformative, teaching her new skills and preparing her for a career path she hadn’t envisioned before.

“It taught me how to storyboard, how to structure books, it takes a lot of planning,” Calvento said. “And I’m actually doing children’s books as a living right now because of it.”

Orenshein has been busy since graduating, finishing 14 stories that still need collaborating artists.

“I work faster than I can find illustrators,” Orenshein said.

Orenshein is still looking for artists and still putting up flyers around CSUN. If you ask Calvento for her advice, she’d tell you not to just walk past those bulletin boards on campus.

“If you see an opportunity, take it,” Calvento said. “You don’t know where it could lead. I thought this was something small, but it became this real legit book that I have. It’s always been on my bucket list to have a book, and now it’s given me experience in real life, a career. So, if you see something that interests you, just go for it.”

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Star running back Devin Singletary declares for the 2019 NFL Draft

The most productive football player in FAU history is taking his talents to the next level, as star running back Devin Singletary announced in a Twitter post that he is declaring for the 2019 NFL draft.

“I hope I left a lasting impression on The University, football program, and the entire community,” Singletary wrote in the tweet. ““As I take the next step in to my career I will continue to represent FAU in the right way and you will forever be in my heart.”

Singletary is coming off an incredible junior season, rushing for 1,348 yards and 22 touchdowns on 5.2 yards per carry. His sophomore year was equally as special, the running back picking up 1,920 rushing yards to go along with 32 touchdowns.

Consistently fighting to get extra yards, Singletary is an incredibly powerful rusher who can shed tackles and truck defenders with ease. While he stands at just 5-foot 9, he is as hard to bring down as any big-bodied ballcarrier.

NFL teams will be salivating at the chance to get Singletary after the record-breaking career he had in Boca Raton. In only three season, Singletary became the leading rusher in FAU history and is sixth all-time in touchdowns nationally (66).

Singletary is the second Owl to declare early for the NFL draft, as redshirt-junior wide receiver Jovon Durante declared days prior. Walter Football, an NFL draft analysis website, projects Singletary to be selected between the second and fourth round.

If Singletary were selected in the second round, he would be the highest drafted player in program history. Defensive end Trey Hendrickson and cornerback D’Joun Smith were both taken in the third round in 2017 and 2015 respectively.

FAU fans will miss No. 5 taking the field at FAU Stadium, but can cheer him on wherever he lands in the professional ranks.

Zachary Weinberger is a contributing writer with the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email zawein11@gmail.com or tweet him @ZachWeinberger

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Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Oakland files lawsuit against Raiders, NFL

The town is taking the Raiders and NFL to court.
On Tuesday, City Attorney Barbara Parker said she will file a federal antitrust lawsuit against the team and the league, a suit city leaders hope could net millions in damages and pay off the approximately $80 million in debt remaining from renovations at the Coliseum.
It may also send the on-again, off-again Oakland Raiders packing early for Las Vegas.
Parker said the NFL violated antitrust laws by approving the move to Vegas and the team’s departure goes against the league’s relocation policy.
“The defendants brazenly violated federal antitrust law and the league’s own policies when they boycotted Oakland as a host city,” Parker said in a statement. “The Raiders’ illegal move lines the pockets of NFL owners and sticks Oakland, its residents, taxpayers and dedicated fans with the bill. The purpose of this lawsuit is to hold the defendants accountable and help to compensate Oakland for the damages the defendants’ unlawful actions have caused and will cause to the people of Oakland.”
Oakland City Council had earlier voted to authorize Parker to file the suit, along with outside law firms. Two fan groups, We Stand with Oakland and Forever Oakland, led by Raymond Bobbitt and Gregory “Griz” Jones, first called for legal action.
The outside law firms include Berg & Androphy and Pearson, Simon & Warshaw, LLP. “The NFL has a long history of misusing its tremendous market power in violation of antitrust laws,” Quinn, the lead attorney from Berg & Androphy said in a statement. “This time the NFL defendants violated their own bylaws in their effort to cash in on the Raiders’ move. Oakland is standing up to this unlawful and disloyal treatment by the league owners.”
Quinn has had success in other suits against the NFL and in a case earlier this year, a judge in Missouri ruled in favor of St. Louis officials suing the Rams for relocating to Los Angeles.
But legal victories in antitrust cases against the NFL are rare. Stadium expert Roger Noll, professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University, earlier said the only successful antitrust suit by a city against the league was LA Coliseum vs. NFL, which included the Raiders.
“Many cities have sued to try to block a team from moving, and none have succeeded,” Noll said in September. “Of course, the city (Oakland) may have an interesting, new theory of antitrust harm, so I want to read the complaint before I reach a conclusion about the merits.”
The suit comes as the Coliseum authority is negotiating with the Raiders to extend the team’s Coliseum lease for one year. The lease negotiations could include an option to play the 2020 season in Oakland in case the $1.9 billion, 65,000-seat Las Vegas stadium doesn’t open on schedule.
Coliseum authority Executive Director Scott McKibben said the team “made it very clear” it would not sign a lease extension if a lawsuit is filed.
“The Raiders demand language that assures them the city will not file a lawsuit against them,” McKibben said Tuesday.
Team officials have not commented since word of a potential lawsuit first leaked out in September. Team owner Mark Davis, too, has not returned messages. The outside law firms have taken the case on a contingency basis, meaning it comes at not cost to the city, though critics have worried about the possibility that Oakland would not be covered if the Raiders filed a counter suit.
It’s unclear where the team would play in 2019, if not at the Coliseum. Noll said there are no attractive options in the Bay Area or Las Vegas. Seating capacity at college stadiums are smaller than the Coliseum, he said.
“In this case, the Raiders would be sacrificing a lot not to stay in the Coliseum, so the issue is how much it is worth to them to retaliate against the city on their way out of town,” Noll said. “As a business proposition, moving next year makes no sense.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Oakland files lawsuit against Raiders, NFL

The town is taking the Raiders and NFL to court.
On Tuesday, City Attorney Barbara Parker said she will file a federal antitrust lawsuit against the team and the league, a suit city leaders hope could net millions in damages and pay off the approximately $80 million in debt remaining from renovations at the Coliseum.
It may also send the on-again, off-again Oakland Raiders packing early for Las Vegas.
Parker said the NFL violated antitrust laws by approving the move to Vegas and the team’s departure goes against the league’s relocation policy.
“The defendants brazenly violated federal antitrust law and the league’s own policies when they boycotted Oakland as a host city,” Parker said in a statement. “The Raiders’ illegal move lines the pockets of NFL owners and sticks Oakland, its residents, taxpayers and dedicated fans with the bill. The purpose of this lawsuit is to hold the defendants accountable and help to compensate Oakland for the damages the defendants’ unlawful actions have caused and will cause to the people of Oakland.”
Oakland City Council had earlier voted to authorize Parker to file the suit, along with outside law firms. Two fan groups, We Stand with Oakland and Forever Oakland, led by Raymond Bobbitt and Gregory “Griz” Jones, first called for legal action.
The outside law firms include Berg & Androphy and Pearson, Simon & Warshaw, LLP. “The NFL has a long history of misusing its tremendous market power in violation of antitrust laws,” Quinn, the lead attorney from Berg & Androphy said in a statement. “This time the NFL defendants violated their own bylaws in their effort to cash in on the Raiders’ move. Oakland is standing up to this unlawful and disloyal treatment by the league owners.”
Quinn has had success in other suits against the NFL and in a case earlier this year, a judge in Missouri ruled in favor of St. Louis officials suing the Rams for relocating to Los Angeles.
But legal victories in antitrust cases against the NFL are rare. Stadium expert Roger Noll, professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University, earlier said the only successful antitrust suit by a city against the league was LA Coliseum vs. NFL, which included the Raiders.
“Many cities have sued to try to block a team from moving, and none have succeeded,” Noll said in September. “Of course, the city (Oakland) may have an interesting, new theory of antitrust harm, so I want to read the complaint before I reach a conclusion about the merits.”
The suit comes as the Coliseum authority is negotiating with the Raiders to extend the team’s Coliseum lease for one year. The lease negotiations could include an option to play the 2020 season in Oakland in case the $1.9 billion, 65,000-seat Las Vegas stadium doesn’t open on schedule.
Coliseum authority Executive Director Scott McKibben said the team “made it very clear” it would not sign a lease extension if a lawsuit is filed.
“The Raiders demand language that assures them the city will not file a lawsuit against them,” McKibben said Tuesday.
Team officials have not commented since word of a potential lawsuit first leaked out in September. Team owner Mark Davis, too, has not returned messages. The outside law firms have taken the case on a contingency basis, meaning it comes at not cost to the city, though critics have worried about the possibility that Oakland would not be covered if the Raiders filed a counter suit.
It’s unclear where the team would play in 2019, if not at the Coliseum. Noll said there are no attractive options in the Bay Area or Las Vegas. Seating capacity at college stadiums are smaller than the Coliseum, he said.
“In this case, the Raiders would be sacrificing a lot not to stay in the Coliseum, so the issue is how much it is worth to them to retaliate against the city on their way out of town,” Noll said. “As a business proposition, moving next year makes no sense.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Oakland files lawsuit against Raiders, NFL

The town is taking the Raiders and NFL to court.
On Tuesday, City Attorney Barbara Parker said she will file a federal antitrust lawsuit against the team and the league, a suit city leaders hope could net millions in damages and pay off the approximately $80 million in debt remaining from renovations at the Coliseum.
It may also send the on-again, off-again Oakland Raiders packing early for Las Vegas.
Parker said the NFL violated antitrust laws by approving the move to Vegas and the team’s departure goes against the league’s relocation policy.
“The defendants brazenly violated federal antitrust law and the league’s own policies when they boycotted Oakland as a host city,” Parker said in a statement. “The Raiders’ illegal move lines the pockets of NFL owners and sticks Oakland, its residents, taxpayers and dedicated fans with the bill. The purpose of this lawsuit is to hold the defendants accountable and help to compensate Oakland for the damages the defendants’ unlawful actions have caused and will cause to the people of Oakland.”
Oakland City Council had earlier voted to authorize Parker to file the suit, along with outside law firms. Two fan groups, We Stand with Oakland and Forever Oakland, led by Raymond Bobbitt and Gregory “Griz” Jones, first called for legal action.
The outside law firms include Berg & Androphy and Pearson, Simon & Warshaw, LLP. “The NFL has a long history of misusing its tremendous market power in violation of antitrust laws,” Quinn, the lead attorney from Berg & Androphy said in a statement. “This time the NFL defendants violated their own bylaws in their effort to cash in on the Raiders’ move. Oakland is standing up to this unlawful and disloyal treatment by the league owners.”
Quinn has had success in other suits against the NFL and in a case earlier this year, a judge in Missouri ruled in favor of St. Louis officials suing the Rams for relocating to Los Angeles.
But legal victories in antitrust cases against the NFL are rare. Stadium expert Roger Noll, professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University, earlier said the only successful antitrust suit by a city against the league was LA Coliseum vs. NFL, which included the Raiders.
“Many cities have sued to try to block a team from moving, and none have succeeded,” Noll said in September. “Of course, the city (Oakland) may have an interesting, new theory of antitrust harm, so I want to read the complaint before I reach a conclusion about the merits.”
The suit comes as the Coliseum authority is negotiating with the Raiders to extend the team’s Coliseum lease for one year. The lease negotiations could include an option to play the 2020 season in Oakland in case the $1.9 billion, 65,000-seat Las Vegas stadium doesn’t open on schedule.
Coliseum authority Executive Director Scott McKibben said the team “made it very clear” it would not sign a lease extension if a lawsuit is filed.
“The Raiders demand language that assures them the city will not file a lawsuit against them,” McKibben said Tuesday.
Team officials have not commented since word of a potential lawsuit first leaked out in September. Team owner Mark Davis, too, has not returned messages. The outside law firms have taken the case on a contingency basis, meaning it comes at not cost to the city, though critics have worried about the possibility that Oakland would not be covered if the Raiders filed a counter suit.
It’s unclear where the team would play in 2019, if not at the Coliseum. Noll said there are no attractive options in the Bay Area or Las Vegas. Seating capacity at college stadiums are smaller than the Coliseum, he said.
“In this case, the Raiders would be sacrificing a lot not to stay in the Coliseum, so the issue is how much it is worth to them to retaliate against the city on their way out of town,” Noll said. “As a business proposition, moving next year makes no sense.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Oakland files lawsuit against Raiders, NFL

The town is taking the Raiders and NFL to court.
On Tuesday, City Attorney Barbara Parker said she will file a federal antitrust lawsuit against the team and the league, a suit city leaders hope could net millions in damages and pay off the approximately $80 million in debt remaining from renovations at the Coliseum.
It may also send the on-again, off-again Oakland Raiders packing early for Las Vegas.
Parker said the NFL violated antitrust laws by approving the move to Vegas and the team’s departure goes against the league’s relocation policy.
“The defendants brazenly violated federal antitrust law and the league’s own policies when they boycotted Oakland as a host city,” Parker said in a statement. “The Raiders’ illegal move lines the pockets of NFL owners and sticks Oakland, its residents, taxpayers and dedicated fans with the bill. The purpose of this lawsuit is to hold the defendants accountable and help to compensate Oakland for the damages the defendants’ unlawful actions have caused and will cause to the people of Oakland.”
Oakland City Council had earlier voted to authorize Parker to file the suit, along with outside law firms. Two fan groups, We Stand with Oakland and Forever Oakland, led by Raymond Bobbitt and Gregory “Griz” Jones, first called for legal action.
The outside law firms include Berg & Androphy and Pearson, Simon & Warshaw, LLP. “The NFL has a long history of misusing its tremendous market power in violation of antitrust laws,” Quinn, the lead attorney from Berg & Androphy said in a statement. “This time the NFL defendants violated their own bylaws in their effort to cash in on the Raiders’ move. Oakland is standing up to this unlawful and disloyal treatment by the league owners.”
Quinn has had success in other suits against the NFL and in a case earlier this year, a judge in Missouri ruled in favor of St. Louis officials suing the Rams for relocating to Los Angeles.
But legal victories in antitrust cases against the NFL are rare. Stadium expert Roger Noll, professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University, earlier said the only successful antitrust suit by a city against the league was LA Coliseum vs. NFL, which included the Raiders.
“Many cities have sued to try to block a team from moving, and none have succeeded,” Noll said in September. “Of course, the city (Oakland) may have an interesting, new theory of antitrust harm, so I want to read the complaint before I reach a conclusion about the merits.”
The suit comes as the Coliseum authority is negotiating with the Raiders to extend the team’s Coliseum lease for one year. The lease negotiations could include an option to play the 2020 season in Oakland in case the $1.9 billion, 65,000-seat Las Vegas stadium doesn’t open on schedule.
Coliseum authority Executive Director Scott McKibben said the team “made it very clear” it would not sign a lease extension if a lawsuit is filed.
“The Raiders demand language that assures them the city will not file a lawsuit against them,” McKibben said Tuesday.
Team officials have not commented since word of a potential lawsuit first leaked out in September. Team owner Mark Davis, too, has not returned messages. The outside law firms have taken the case on a contingency basis, meaning it comes at not cost to the city, though critics have worried about the possibility that Oakland would not be covered if the Raiders filed a counter suit.
It’s unclear where the team would play in 2019, if not at the Coliseum. Noll said there are no attractive options in the Bay Area or Las Vegas. Seating capacity at college stadiums are smaller than the Coliseum, he said.
“In this case, the Raiders would be sacrificing a lot not to stay in the Coliseum, so the issue is how much it is worth to them to retaliate against the city on their way out of town,” Noll said. “As a business proposition, moving next year makes no sense.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Oakland files lawsuit against Raiders, NFL

The town is taking the Raiders and NFL to court.
On Tuesday, City Attorney Barbara Parker said she will file a federal antitrust lawsuit against the team and the league, a suit city leaders hope could net millions in damages and pay off the approximately $80 million in debt remaining from renovations at the Coliseum.
It may also send the on-again, off-again Oakland Raiders packing early for Las Vegas.
Parker said the NFL violated antitrust laws by approving the move to Vegas and the team’s departure goes against the league’s relocation policy.
“The defendants brazenly violated federal antitrust law and the league’s own policies when they boycotted Oakland as a host city,” Parker said in a statement. “The Raiders’ illegal move lines the pockets of NFL owners and sticks Oakland, its residents, taxpayers and dedicated fans with the bill. The purpose of this lawsuit is to hold the defendants accountable and help to compensate Oakland for the damages the defendants’ unlawful actions have caused and will cause to the people of Oakland.”
Oakland City Council had earlier voted to authorize Parker to file the suit, along with outside law firms. Two fan groups, We Stand with Oakland and Forever Oakland, led by Raymond Bobbitt and Gregory “Griz” Jones, first called for legal action.
The outside law firms include Berg & Androphy and Pearson, Simon & Warshaw, LLP. “The NFL has a long history of misusing its tremendous market power in violation of antitrust laws,” Quinn, the lead attorney from Berg & Androphy said in a statement. “This time the NFL defendants violated their own bylaws in their effort to cash in on the Raiders’ move. Oakland is standing up to this unlawful and disloyal treatment by the league owners.”
Quinn has had success in other suits against the NFL and in a case earlier this year, a judge in Missouri ruled in favor of St. Louis officials suing the Rams for relocating to Los Angeles.
But legal victories in antitrust cases against the NFL are rare. Stadium expert Roger Noll, professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University, earlier said the only successful antitrust suit by a city against the league was LA Coliseum vs. NFL, which included the Raiders.
“Many cities have sued to try to block a team from moving, and none have succeeded,” Noll said in September. “Of course, the city (Oakland) may have an interesting, new theory of antitrust harm, so I want to read the complaint before I reach a conclusion about the merits.”
The suit comes as the Coliseum authority is negotiating with the Raiders to extend the team’s Coliseum lease for one year. The lease negotiations could include an option to play the 2020 season in Oakland in case the $1.9 billion, 65,000-seat Las Vegas stadium doesn’t open on schedule.
Coliseum authority Executive Director Scott McKibben said the team “made it very clear” it would not sign a lease extension if a lawsuit is filed.
“The Raiders demand language that assures them the city will not file a lawsuit against them,” McKibben said Tuesday.
Team officials have not commented since word of a potential lawsuit first leaked out in September. Team owner Mark Davis, too, has not returned messages. The outside law firms have taken the case on a contingency basis, meaning it comes at not cost to the city, though critics have worried about the possibility that Oakland would not be covered if the Raiders filed a counter suit.
It’s unclear where the team would play in 2019, if not at the Coliseum. Noll said there are no attractive options in the Bay Area or Las Vegas. Seating capacity at college stadiums are smaller than the Coliseum, he said.
“In this case, the Raiders would be sacrificing a lot not to stay in the Coliseum, so the issue is how much it is worth to them to retaliate against the city on their way out of town,” Noll said. “As a business proposition, moving next year makes no sense.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Oakland files lawsuit against Raiders, NFL

The town is taking the Raiders and NFL to court.
On Tuesday, City Attorney Barbara Parker said she will file a federal antitrust lawsuit against the team and the league, a suit city leaders hope could net millions in damages and pay off the approximately $80 million in debt remaining from renovations at the Coliseum.
It may also send the on-again, off-again Oakland Raiders packing early for Las Vegas.
Parker said the NFL violated antitrust laws by approving the move to Vegas and the team’s departure goes against the league’s relocation policy.
“The defendants brazenly violated federal antitrust law and the league’s own policies when they boycotted Oakland as a host city,” Parker said in a statement. “The Raiders’ illegal move lines the pockets of NFL owners and sticks Oakland, its residents, taxpayers and dedicated fans with the bill. The purpose of this lawsuit is to hold the defendants accountable and help to compensate Oakland for the damages the defendants’ unlawful actions have caused and will cause to the people of Oakland.”
Oakland City Council had earlier voted to authorize Parker to file the suit, along with outside law firms. Two fan groups, We Stand with Oakland and Forever Oakland, led by Raymond Bobbitt and Gregory “Griz” Jones, first called for legal action.
The outside law firms include Berg & Androphy and Pearson, Simon & Warshaw, LLP. “The NFL has a long history of misusing its tremendous market power in violation of antitrust laws,” Quinn, the lead attorney from Berg & Androphy said in a statement. “This time the NFL defendants violated their own bylaws in their effort to cash in on the Raiders’ move. Oakland is standing up to this unlawful and disloyal treatment by the league owners.”
Quinn has had success in other suits against the NFL and in a case earlier this year, a judge in Missouri ruled in favor of St. Louis officials suing the Rams for relocating to Los Angeles.
But legal victories in antitrust cases against the NFL are rare. Stadium expert Roger Noll, professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University, earlier said the only successful antitrust suit by a city against the league was LA Coliseum vs. NFL, which included the Raiders.
“Many cities have sued to try to block a team from moving, and none have succeeded,” Noll said in September. “Of course, the city (Oakland) may have an interesting, new theory of antitrust harm, so I want to read the complaint before I reach a conclusion about the merits.”
The suit comes as the Coliseum authority is negotiating with the Raiders to extend the team’s Coliseum lease for one year. The lease negotiations could include an option to play the 2020 season in Oakland in case the $1.9 billion, 65,000-seat Las Vegas stadium doesn’t open on schedule.
Coliseum authority Executive Director Scott McKibben said the team “made it very clear” it would not sign a lease extension if a lawsuit is filed.
“The Raiders demand language that assures them the city will not file a lawsuit against them,” McKibben said Tuesday.
Team officials have not commented since word of a potential lawsuit first leaked out in September. Team owner Mark Davis, too, has not returned messages. The outside law firms have taken the case on a contingency basis, meaning it comes at not cost to the city, though critics have worried about the possibility that Oakland would not be covered if the Raiders filed a counter suit.
It’s unclear where the team would play in 2019, if not at the Coliseum. Noll said there are no attractive options in the Bay Area or Las Vegas. Seating capacity at college stadiums are smaller than the Coliseum, he said.
“In this case, the Raiders would be sacrificing a lot not to stay in the Coliseum, so the issue is how much it is worth to them to retaliate against the city on their way out of town,” Noll said. “As a business proposition, moving next year makes no sense.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Oakland files lawsuit against Raiders, NFL

The town is taking the Raiders and NFL to court.
On Tuesday, City Attorney Barbara Parker said she will file a federal antitrust lawsuit against the team and the league, a suit city leaders hope could net millions in damages and pay off the approximately $80 million in debt remaining from renovations at the Coliseum.
It may also send the on-again, off-again Oakland Raiders packing early for Las Vegas.
Parker said the NFL violated antitrust laws by approving the move to Vegas and the team’s departure goes against the league’s relocation policy.
“The defendants brazenly violated federal antitrust law and the league’s own policies when they boycotted Oakland as a host city,” Parker said in a statement. “The Raiders’ illegal move lines the pockets of NFL owners and sticks Oakland, its residents, taxpayers and dedicated fans with the bill. The purpose of this lawsuit is to hold the defendants accountable and help to compensate Oakland for the damages the defendants’ unlawful actions have caused and will cause to the people of Oakland.”
Oakland City Council had earlier voted to authorize Parker to file the suit, along with outside law firms. Two fan groups, We Stand with Oakland and Forever Oakland, led by Raymond Bobbitt and Gregory “Griz” Jones, first called for legal action.
The outside law firms include Berg & Androphy and Pearson, Simon & Warshaw, LLP. “The NFL has a long history of misusing its tremendous market power in violation of antitrust laws,” Quinn, the lead attorney from Berg & Androphy said in a statement. “This time the NFL defendants violated their own bylaws in their effort to cash in on the Raiders’ move. Oakland is standing up to this unlawful and disloyal treatment by the league owners.”
Quinn has had success in other suits against the NFL and in a case earlier this year, a judge in Missouri ruled in favor of St. Louis officials suing the Rams for relocating to Los Angeles.
But legal victories in antitrust cases against the NFL are rare. Stadium expert Roger Noll, professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University, earlier said the only successful antitrust suit by a city against the league was LA Coliseum vs. NFL, which included the Raiders.
“Many cities have sued to try to block a team from moving, and none have succeeded,” Noll said in September. “Of course, the city (Oakland) may have an interesting, new theory of antitrust harm, so I want to read the complaint before I reach a conclusion about the merits.”
The suit comes as the Coliseum authority is negotiating with the Raiders to extend the team’s Coliseum lease for one year. The lease negotiations could include an option to play the 2020 season in Oakland in case the $1.9 billion, 65,000-seat Las Vegas stadium doesn’t open on schedule.
Coliseum authority Executive Director Scott McKibben said the team “made it very clear” it would not sign a lease extension if a lawsuit is filed.
“The Raiders demand language that assures them the city will not file a lawsuit against them,” McKibben said Tuesday.
Team officials have not commented since word of a potential lawsuit first leaked out in September. Team owner Mark Davis, too, has not returned messages. The outside law firms have taken the case on a contingency basis, meaning it comes at not cost to the city, though critics have worried about the possibility that Oakland would not be covered if the Raiders filed a counter suit.
It’s unclear where the team would play in 2019, if not at the Coliseum. Noll said there are no attractive options in the Bay Area or Las Vegas. Seating capacity at college stadiums are smaller than the Coliseum, he said.
“In this case, the Raiders would be sacrificing a lot not to stay in the Coliseum, so the issue is how much it is worth to them to retaliate against the city on their way out of town,” Noll said. “As a business proposition, moving next year makes no sense.”

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Are You Transy Field Hockey’s Newest Recruit?

Last week, many of you received an email recruiting you to play a sport you probably have never played in your life. That sport would be field hockey, and don’t worry, you weren’t the only one. If you received an email last week asking you to fill out a recruiting form, you’re in good company. The email went out to roughly 300,000 other people across the world.

While this was undoubtedly the result of a simple email mishap, it did make for quite the relatable moment for all of us who rely so heavily on technology. Everyone has hit reply all or sent a text to the wrong person before. Maybe not one that went out to over a quarter of a million people, but at the very least this made for some funny replies from people all across the globe.

There was a 73-year-old man who received the recruitment email and decided to write a reply. He said he still has remaining eligibility and that we should give him a shot. Before we get too carried away, it’s only fair that he comes in for a tryout so we can see his stick skills and his 40-yard dash time. If he’s got game, I say sign him up.

Another email was from a parent who has a son in high school who is awaiting emails from college coaches. The parent expressed gratitude for a college coach finally reaching out. This probably wasn’t the email the son wanted, or received because it was sent to the parent, but to that kid we say there is plenty of room for you to be a Pioneer. You just probably won’t be a member of the field hockey team.

Audrey Denham, a current junior on the team, wanted to express gratitude to her coaching staff for being so open-minded and inclusive. She said, “Well, I was kind of surprised that I was getting recruited again, which was pretty exciting. It’s an honor to be a part of a team that wants to include all of Transy and all of America.”

While Denham was thankful, there were some students at Transy who were slightly annoyed with the whole thing. They weren’t annoyed that they received the email. In fact they were bothered that they didn’t receive the email. Senior Charli Odenwelder stated, “I didn’t get the email and I was so offended. I have friends at Indiana University who got it and I actually go here.” Hang in there, Charli. Maybe field hockey just isn’t for you.

Any way you chop it up, Transylvania Field Hockey is now on the map. In fact, it’s all over the map. If everyone who received the email signed up to come to our esteemed university, we would be the first college to have over 300,000 students at one time. There’s a first time for everything, and hey, we are after all the Pioneers.

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Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Are You Transy Field Hockey’s Newest Recruit?

Last week, many of you received an email recruiting you to play a sport you probably have never played in your life. That sport would be field hockey, and don’t worry, you weren’t the only one. If you received an email last week asking you to fill out a recruiting form, you’re in good company. The email went out to roughly 300,000 other people across the world.

While this was undoubtedly the result of a simple email mishap, it did make for quite the relatable moment for all of us who rely so heavily on technology. Everyone has hit reply all or sent a text to the wrong person before. Maybe not one that went out to over a quarter of a million people, but at the very least this made for some funny replies from people all across the globe.

There was a 73-year-old man who received the recruitment email and decided to write a reply. He said he still has remaining eligibility and that we should give him a shot. Before we get too carried away, it’s only fair that he comes in for a tryout so we can see his stick skills and his 40-yard dash time. If he’s got game, I say sign him up.

Another email was from a parent who has a son in high school who is awaiting emails from college coaches. The parent expressed gratitude for a college coach finally reaching out. This probably wasn’t the email the son wanted, or received because it was sent to the parent, but to that kid we say there is plenty of room for you to be a Pioneer. You just probably won’t be a member of the field hockey team.

Audrey Denham, a current junior on the team, wanted to express gratitude to her coaching staff for being so open-minded and inclusive. She said, “Well, I was kind of surprised that I was getting recruited again, which was pretty exciting. It’s an honor to be a part of a team that wants to include all of Transy and all of America.”

While Denham was thankful, there were some students at Transy who were slightly annoyed with the whole thing. They weren’t annoyed that they received the email. In fact they were bothered that they didn’t receive the email. Senior Charli Odenwelder stated, “I didn’t get the email and I was so offended. I have friends at Indiana University who got it and I actually go here.” Hang in there, Charli. Maybe field hockey just isn’t for you.

Any way you chop it up, Transylvania Field Hockey is now on the map. In fact, it’s all over the map. If everyone who received the email signed up to come to our esteemed university, we would be the first college to have over 300,000 students at one time. There’s a first time for everything, and hey, we are after all the Pioneers.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Are You Transy Field Hockey’s Newest Recruit?

Last week, many of you received an email recruiting you to play a sport you probably have never played in your life. That sport would be field hockey, and don’t worry, you weren’t the only one. If you received an email last week asking you to fill out a recruiting form, you’re in good company. The email went out to roughly 300,000 other people across the world.

While this was undoubtedly the result of a simple email mishap, it did make for quite the relatable moment for all of us who rely so heavily on technology. Everyone has hit reply all or sent a text to the wrong person before. Maybe not one that went out to over a quarter of a million people, but at the very least this made for some funny replies from people all across the globe.

There was a 73-year-old man who received the recruitment email and decided to write a reply. He said he still has remaining eligibility and that we should give him a shot. Before we get too carried away, it’s only fair that he comes in for a tryout so we can see his stick skills and his 40-yard dash time. If he’s got game, I say sign him up.

Another email was from a parent who has a son in high school who is awaiting emails from college coaches. The parent expressed gratitude for a college coach finally reaching out. This probably wasn’t the email the son wanted, or received because it was sent to the parent, but to that kid we say there is plenty of room for you to be a Pioneer. You just probably won’t be a member of the field hockey team.

Audrey Denham, a current junior on the team, wanted to express gratitude to her coaching staff for being so open-minded and inclusive. She said, “Well, I was kind of surprised that I was getting recruited again, which was pretty exciting. It’s an honor to be a part of a team that wants to include all of Transy and all of America.”

While Denham was thankful, there were some students at Transy who were slightly annoyed with the whole thing. They weren’t annoyed that they received the email. In fact they were bothered that they didn’t receive the email. Senior Charli Odenwelder stated, “I didn’t get the email and I was so offended. I have friends at Indiana University who got it and I actually go here.” Hang in there, Charli. Maybe field hockey just isn’t for you.

Any way you chop it up, Transylvania Field Hockey is now on the map. In fact, it’s all over the map. If everyone who received the email signed up to come to our esteemed university, we would be the first college to have over 300,000 students at one time. There’s a first time for everything, and hey, we are after all the Pioneers.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Are You Transy Field Hockey’s Newest Recruit?

Last week, many of you received an email recruiting you to play a sport you probably have never played in your life. That sport would be field hockey, and don’t worry, you weren’t the only one. If you received an email last week asking you to fill out a recruiting form, you’re in good company. The email went out to roughly 300,000 other people across the world.

While this was undoubtedly the result of a simple email mishap, it did make for quite the relatable moment for all of us who rely so heavily on technology. Everyone has hit reply all or sent a text to the wrong person before. Maybe not one that went out to over a quarter of a million people, but at the very least this made for some funny replies from people all across the globe.

There was a 73-year-old man who received the recruitment email and decided to write a reply. He said he still has remaining eligibility and that we should give him a shot. Before we get too carried away, it’s only fair that he comes in for a tryout so we can see his stick skills and his 40-yard dash time. If he’s got game, I say sign him up.

Another email was from a parent who has a son in high school who is awaiting emails from college coaches. The parent expressed gratitude for a college coach finally reaching out. This probably wasn’t the email the son wanted, or received because it was sent to the parent, but to that kid we say there is plenty of room for you to be a Pioneer. You just probably won’t be a member of the field hockey team.

Audrey Denham, a current junior on the team, wanted to express gratitude to her coaching staff for being so open-minded and inclusive. She said, “Well, I was kind of surprised that I was getting recruited again, which was pretty exciting. It’s an honor to be a part of a team that wants to include all of Transy and all of America.”

While Denham was thankful, there were some students at Transy who were slightly annoyed with the whole thing. They weren’t annoyed that they received the email. In fact they were bothered that they didn’t receive the email. Senior Charli Odenwelder stated, “I didn’t get the email and I was so offended. I have friends at Indiana University who got it and I actually go here.” Hang in there, Charli. Maybe field hockey just isn’t for you.

Any way you chop it up, Transylvania Field Hockey is now on the map. In fact, it’s all over the map. If everyone who received the email signed up to come to our esteemed university, we would be the first college to have over 300,000 students at one time. There’s a first time for everything, and hey, we are after all the Pioneers.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.

Are You Transy Field Hockey’s Newest Recruit?

Last week, many of you received an email recruiting you to play a sport you probably have never played in your life. That sport would be field hockey, and don’t worry, you weren’t the only one. If you received an email last week asking you to fill out a recruiting form, you’re in good company. The email went out to roughly 300,000 other people across the world.

While this was undoubtedly the result of a simple email mishap, it did make for quite the relatable moment for all of us who rely so heavily on technology. Everyone has hit reply all or sent a text to the wrong person before. Maybe not one that went out to over a quarter of a million people, but at the very least this made for some funny replies from people all across the globe.

There was a 73-year-old man who received the recruitment email and decided to write a reply. He said he still has remaining eligibility and that we should give him a shot. Before we get too carried away, it’s only fair that he comes in for a tryout so we can see his stick skills and his 40-yard dash time. If he’s got game, I say sign him up.

Another email was from a parent who has a son in high school who is awaiting emails from college coaches. The parent expressed gratitude for a college coach finally reaching out. This probably wasn’t the email the son wanted, or received because it was sent to the parent, but to that kid we say there is plenty of room for you to be a Pioneer. You just probably won’t be a member of the field hockey team.

Audrey Denham, a current junior on the team, wanted to express gratitude to her coaching staff for being so open-minded and inclusive. She said, “Well, I was kind of surprised that I was getting recruited again, which was pretty exciting. It’s an honor to be a part of a team that wants to include all of Transy and all of America.”

While Denham was thankful, there were some students at Transy who were slightly annoyed with the whole thing. They weren’t annoyed that they received the email. In fact they were bothered that they didn’t receive the email. Senior Charli Odenwelder stated, “I didn’t get the email and I was so offended. I have friends at Indiana University who got it and I actually go here.” Hang in there, Charli. Maybe field hockey just isn’t for you.

Any way you chop it up, Transylvania Field Hockey is now on the map. In fact, it’s all over the map. If everyone who received the email signed up to come to our esteemed university, we would be the first college to have over 300,000 students at one time. There’s a first time for everything, and hey, we are after all the Pioneers.

***

Note from Journals.Today : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.