Midterms a win for Trump as Connecticut buries itself six feet under

 Governor-elect Ned Lamont speaks to supporters in Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018. Lamont won election Wednesday as Connecticut's governor, keeping the office in Democratic hands in part by promising to be a "firewall" against the policies of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill

Governor-elect Ned Lamont speaks to supporters in Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018. Lamont won election Wednesday as Connecticut’s governor, keeping the office in Democratic hands in part by promising to be a “firewall” against the policies of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill

On Tuesday night, Democrats seized control of the House of Representatives for the first time since 2010, ensuring that the back nine of President Trump’s first term will be largely uneventful. A red surge propelled by Kavanaugh backlash secured four additional seats in the Senate, as Republicans retained the majority. The voters of Connecticut elected Dan Malloy 2.0 and the proverbial you-know-what’s about to hit the fan. Amidst what has been arguably the most unpredictable two years in recent memory, let’s unpack what was an immensely predictable evening.

Historically, the president’s party loses an average of thirty seats in Congress during midterm elections, due to a mobilized base foaming at the mouth to swing back the pendulum of political power in their party’s favor. Democrats did just that on Tuesday evening…kind of. In retaking control of the House, as they were projected to, Democrats gained the opportunity to finally accomplish that which they’ve sought all along.

According to CNBC’s Jacob Pramuk, “(Democrats) appear poised to go after the president’s elusive tax returns. They also could pass legislation aimed at protecting special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe.”This all sounds very productive, but Democrats are salivating over a juicier steak.

House Democrats will likely serve the president with articles of impeachment. What high crimes and misdemeanors Democrats will manufacture against Trump are irrelevant, as it’s a numbers game at this point and Democrats have the numbers…kind of. You see, even in their last gasp squirt of blue liquid, certainly not a wave, Democrats find themselves in limbo. The left’s MO is to rid the country of President Trump, but, alas, the president will not be vacating any time soon, as Republicans will likely acquit Trump of wrongdoing in the Senate, preventing a removal from office. And so, Americans will whittle away the days until Nov. 3, 2020, as Democrats filibuster their way to the Promised Land.

Democrats’ abysmal handling of Kavanaugh’s allegation-marred confirmation lit a flame under conservative voters who, in turn, rained down an unholy wrath upon incumbent Democratic senators. The only red-state Democrat to retain their seat in the Senate was Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) who, if you recall, was the lone Democrat who voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh. To Sen. Manchin, I say: Welcome back, sir.

Republicans’ avoidance of the midterm carnage suffered by their predecessors is indicative of a firm Trump movement that will likely churn until 2020. President Obama suffered a loss of more than sixty seats in the 2010 midterms, his first as president, whereas Trump stands to lose, at this exact point in time, around thirty in the House. Not a competition.

In the meantime, President Trump’s economic gains are protected by the Republican majority in the Senate, good news for your fat wallet, these days. The party of Trump will also retain its control of federal judicial appointments, in case The Notorious RBG ever yearns to do some shuffle boarding in Florida.

In Connecticut, Ned Lamont prevailed against no odds at all. The favorite played well to a state that loves its taxes and hates its guns. For our sake, I hope Governor Lamont does a phenomenal job, but as this state will come to find, he is the wrong man for it.

With Bob Stefanowski unable to carry Fairfield County, this state has certainly made a mistake that its few remaining residents will regret, at least the ones not on welfare.

The voters of Connecticut are good and smart people. And so, they’ll get what they asked for. When you can’t purchase a cap gun until age 35, don’t complain to me. When you grow tired of battling the government’s hand in your wallet, look in the mirror. The residents of Connecticut have not yet hit rock bottom and, so, we’ll play the waiting game.

Our companies, however, will wait no further. With General Electric, Alexion, Aetna, Bristol-Myers, Konica Minolta and Edible Arrangements, among others, fleeing Connecticut in search of a respite from the devastating taxes and regulations levied by this state’s overbearing liberal government, residents can expect the remaining few to follow suit as Lamont’s victory slammed the door on their false hope for improvement. With Connecticut’s economy ranked second worst in the entire country by the American Legislative Exchange Council, I wonder if Ned Lamont can finally get us over the hump. I want that number one seed.

Like Robert “Beto” O’Rourke and Andrew Gillum, our goose is cooked in Connecticut. Nonetheless, with Democrats back in the game…kind of, I’m curious to see, amid such conjecture, what they’ll be cooking in Congress.


Kevin Catapano is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at kevin.catapano@uconn.edu

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