Pedialyte, the unrecognized hero

Tweet featuring Pedialyte drink.

Tweet featuring Pedialyte drink.

Pedialyte US advertises their electrolyte replacement on Twitter on Sept. 1. Since 2015, the company has targeted adult consumers to buy their products to relieve their dehydration from sickness and excessive drinking.

You’re hungover. Dry heaving into a porcelain toilet, questioning every drink you had the night before. But this isn’t your first hangover. You’re prepared this time, so you crawl to your fridge and pull out the pink liquid of the gods – Pedialyte.

Pedialyte is the most underrated electrolyte replacement. Overshadowed by our constant love for sugar-filled Gatorade and Powerade, memories from our failed high school sports days, Pedialyte is the hangover hero we’ve always needed.

Most people overlook Pedialyte. They don’t want to be found in the baby section of their local Wal-Mart trying to buy a magical kiddie drink that will hopefully make them feel better. There used to be an associated shame with chugging pink juice that is usually given to toddlers.

In 2015, Pedialyte started targeting an older audience, most of who shamefully use their kids Pedialyte when they’ve had too much to drink the night before. Their Twitter bio even reads, “Not just for kids, adults can use Pedialyte too.”

Pedialyte’s Twitter feed is a constant cycle of pictures of Pedialyte bottles next to various beers, or in the hands of a 30-year-old mother chugging on the floor of her kitchen late at night. Healthwise, more people should be taking advantage of Pedialyte because it can help most common hangover symptoms.

“Both glucose and fructose contained in Pedialyte can help both children and adults reabsorb water along with depleted electrolytes, and thus aid in rehydration. It may also offer benefit to those who have experienced symptoms of a hangover associated with vomiting and dehydration, since it may help aid in replacement of needed fluid and important electrolytes,” said Dr. Robert Glatter, a physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. 

Pedialyte has been marketed towards drinking age adults and it’s about time it gets the recognition it deserves. No one needs to chase their liquor with sugary sodas when we can chase it with electrolytes instead. If you’re one of those blessed people who claim to have never experienced a hangover, we know you’re lying and you’re not impressing anyone. Pedialyte consumption is nothing to be ashamed of and has so many great uses.

Around week six of every semester, the strangest stomach virus gets passed from person to person around most college campuses. Not everyone can stop vomiting in their dorm room long enough to make it to the student health center, and others have no idea where the student health center even is. Go to your local convenience store, pay the inflated seven dollars for the smallest bottle of Pedialyte and start chugging.

If you’ve experienced heartbreak, you know that there is inevitably a point where you cry so much you’re physically dehydrated from how many tears you’ve produced. Now, not only is your heart broken, but you’re also dealing with the horrible symptoms of dehydration that can range anywhere from a headache, to nausea and dizziness. Walk to the fridge, grab a straw and start replenishing your body with electrolytes.

There’s no shame in the Pedialyte game. When a liquid has so many uses, costs on average five dollars and can make you feel better, there’s no reason why you should be afraid of walking straight into the baby food section and stocking up.

Pedialyte is heavily underrated and if you’re not using Pedialyte in your life, you should transfer to UNLV where your three brain cells will be of some use in their student body.

Opinions expressed in The Nevada Sagebrush are solely those of the author and do not necessarily express the views of The Sagebrush or of its staff. Jacey Gonzalez is a student at the University of Nevada and studies journalism. She can be reached at jaceygonzalez@sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter @NevadaSagebrush.   

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